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Can there really be such a thing as a fundamental particle?

#21
light is vibrations from another dimension. It behaves like particles and like waves depending on how you look at it. Trouble is the theorists cant proove physics with experiment at the outer boundaries because the energies are too much.. so its all maths and guesswork.
I want to have some of what you are smoking!

@ the OP - the problem with exploring the makeup of quarks and below is that in order to view things at a sub atomic scale, you need to physically interact with it. Looking at an apple is easy - we know it's there because the photons reflecting off it are absorbed by our eyes. At the smallest scales, photons don't interact with many particles, and just to compound things, we know that free quarks don't exist!

This is where theoretical particle physics comes in, and unfortunately, turning theory into fact gets harder the more layers of the onion you peel away.
 
#23
The atom turned out not to be...if there was no such thing then wouldn't that be the answer to time itself? Just a thought....but can you imagine every particle being divisible and yeah the ones we havent split yet...nothing would have an end would it?? therefore no beginning
have you been drinking the bong water.?
 
#24
light is vibrations from another dimension. It behaves like particles and like waves depending on how you look at it. Trouble is the theorists cant proove physics with experiment at the outer boundaries because the energies are too much.. so its all maths and guesswork.
First post after long-time lurking. Hello Arrse.

If I remember my university physics correctly: under Special Relativity, Maxwell's equations unify in four dimensions so that bit sounds right, but i'd draw the line at "guesswork" - educated inductive arguments more like.
 
#25
Little fleas have lesser fleas
Upon their backs to bite them.
And lesser fleas have lesser fleas,
And so ad infinitum.

At least that's what my smart-arsed physical chemistry lecturer always told us.

I still reckon the best part of atomic theory is Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle: you can know where a particle is, or where it's going, but not both.
 
#27
Photons by definition travel at the speed of light, so they experience infinite time dilation and therefore cannot decay. They do go on forever unless they hit something, but they are being progressively stretched in wavelength by the expansion of the universe.
 
T

Taffd

Guest
#28
Photons by definition travel at the speed of light, so they experience infinite time dilation and therefore cannot decay. They do go on forever unless they hit something, but they are being progressively stretched in wavelength by the expansion of the universe.
That's why they act like waves.
 
#29
#35
I've just watched 'The Seven Ages of Starlight' on BBC4. Do you realise we are all the product of Nuclear Waste? We are just the scraps from exploding Supernova.
I gather that Jarrod can be found around Uranus.
 
#37
Talking about the concept of time here...so where does light end since it travels for trillions of miles?
are you suggesting that because some scientist creates some laws based on what he knew at the time, that science wont progress any further?
Fundamentally wrong there, what you are actually doing with a light switch is turning dark on and off. So when you have seen all you want to see, you turn the switch to the off position, which is, in fact, the on position for the introduction of darkness !!!!!!!

Hat, coat, taxi !!
 

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