Can the world afford a cure for malaria?

#1
I saw something in the news yesterday about scientists trialling something they have so far found to be 100% effective in curing / preventing malaria. Recent issues in the news regarding the Bongolians, and their constant need for foreign aid, being unable to form their own infrastructures and generally...survive got me thinking...If we did manage to wipe malaria off the planet - could it effectively be the starting of the biggest humanitarian disaster in the modern age?
 
#5
I think you miss my point. What i'm suggesting is that should we find an all out cure, it will allow some people a short moment of altruistic nirvana - only for them to then witness the Bongolians cooking themselves from the inside at a higher rate of knots than ever before and accelerating exponentially.

Does it affect UK in any but marginal terms? Then it is largely irrelevant.
Given current governments and their policies, and what is deemed to be correct thought then yes - massively.
 
#7
I think that a reliable cure for malaria would be a great thing, but only if it's accompanied by a cure for Catholicism.


If the Africans could sort out birth control (not to mention slow the spread of HIV) then I think everyone will benefit.
 
#8
I saw something in the news yesterday about scientists trialling something they have so far found to be 100% effective in curing / preventing malaria. Recent issues in the news regarding the Bongolians, and their constant need for foreign aid, being unable to form their own infrastructures and generally...survive got me thinking...If we did manage to wipe malaria off the planet - could it effectively be the starting of the biggest humanitarian disaster in the modern age?
Been done.

"The power of population is so superior to the power of the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race.

The vices of mankind are active and able ministers of depopulation. They are the precursors in the great army of destruction, and often finish the dreadful work themselves.

But should they fail in this war of extermination, sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague advance in terrific array, and sweep off their thousands and tens of thousands.

Should success be still incomplete, gigantic inevitable famine stalks in the rear, and with one mighty blow levels the population with the food of the world."

—Malthus T.R. 1798. An essay on the principle of population.

(He was, and still is, right despite what the leftist babblers might wibble on about the "inhumanity" of Malthusian theory)
 
#9
Yes the world can afford a cure for malaria! They can afford to put someone up in space.
One thinks he is not on about the monetary value of trying to find a cure, but the fact that if a cure is found, it will mean more people in the world. The world is filling up pretty quickly at the moment with an estimated 7.5 billion plus people in the world. It won't be long before there will be more people then the world can sustain, which in turn will bring in a whole new world of problems.
 
#11
Overpopulation is the enemy, not malaria... Of course we can afford a cure for malaria but can we afford all the extra mouths to feed?
...and therein lies the rub...

If we completely cure Malaria nature will simply come up with something else to kill us to maintain the balance...

Rodney2q
 
#12
One thinks he is not on about the monetary value of trying to find a cure, but the fact that if a cure is found, it will mean more people in the world. The world is filling up pretty quickly at the moment with an estimated 7.5 billion plus people in the world. It won't be long before there will be more people then the world can sustain, which in turn will bring in a whole new world of problems.
We will be dead by then, thankfully!
 
#13
I saw this story on the Beeb this am.Seems the controlled tests which were "100% successful" were carried out on 40 people.And to store the stuff it needed to be kept deep frozen.
 
#14
I saw this story on the Beeb this am.Seems the controlled tests which were "100% successful" were carried out on 40 people.And to store the stuff it needed to be kept deep frozen.
This is true at the moment, but the use and storage will doubtless become easier as time goes by.

The article mentioned that about 1.2 million die each year from malaria, the increase of population will be higher as many of the new survivors will produce more mouths to feed.

For those who reckon that it will not impinge greatly on Europe and the UK may care to consider where a large proportion of people from malarial countries end up as refugees and medical tourists.
 

CountryGal

MIA
Book Reviewer
#15
Doesnt influenza come around every 100 years or so as a new strain and wipe out a fair few of us?
 

CountryGal

MIA
Book Reviewer
#17
It changes every year and so flu vaccines are different every year. We're reliant on the boffins who look at prevalence get things right.
I was thinking more of an outbreak like the last flu pandemic in 1918 that killed over 20% of people affected - or something like that.
 

CountryGal

MIA
Book Reviewer
#19
Mass vaccination prevents at risk groups dying. We're likely much healthier these days and more able to fight off infection.
Do Africans mass vaccinate though? And they aren't as healthy as more western countries, nor have access to basic medicine and health care.
 

CountryGal

MIA
Book Reviewer
#20

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