Can i join as an officer with no GCSEs & degree from US uni?

#1
I was born in England and grew up there, but left to live in the US at 13, right before i would have taken my GCSEs. I went to a US university, did well and got a degree, and am now 25. I talked to a navy recruiter to see if it was possible to join up, since i have lived in the US so long (i now have US and British citizenship), and apparently it is fine since the US is and acceptable country or something like that.

My question is whether or not it would be possible for me to join as an officer without my GCSEs. I took the SATs in the states (did fiarly well) which would be the closest equivalent they have, but not quite the same.

thanks
 
#3
Speak to the recruiters. There is a team that deal with this sort of thing, we had a lass who had French Quals, Bacc plus 4 IIRC, same as a degree so they siad. There is an online recruiting forum, where you can send them questions like this and they will provide the answers in greater detail than the AFCO. I don't have the link to hand, sorry.
 

Forastero

LE
Moderator
#7
No, really? Do you think? Bugger off back to your playpen and let the grown ups play.
 
#8
Online chat with careers advisors:

http://www.armyonline.mod.uk/


The office is open from 12 noon -10pm (UK Local Time) every weekday. It is closed on Saturdays and open on Sundays from 12 noon - 8pm. The office is closed during public holidays.

Need an answer? Search the Army Knowledge Base/FAQ section here: FAQ

If you would like to speak to an Army Careers Adviser please return during these hours, alternatively you can send the team an email and we will reply within 24 hours. Please click here to send us an email.

Perhaps this link needs stickying if it isn't already?

(Ideal if you don't want your question answered by a 14 yr old cadet or Mike Golden :wink: )



Edited for not being able to read.
 

Forastero

LE
Moderator
#9
Moved by me as he might get a slightly more sensible answer than those offered by Kevin and Perry FFS.
 
#10
Forastero said:
Moved by me as he might get a slightly more sensible answer than those offered by Kevin and Perry FFS.
The irony of this post is that every response other than those by Forastero contain useful advice that anybody in D4VE's position would be wise to follow.

Forastero said:
No, really? Do you think? Bugger off back to your playpen and let the grown ups play.
Which grown ups? You? Read your posts again and then reassess who falls into the grown up category and who does not.
 
#11
IMO Get your quals assessed by NARIC. The careers office might of course know the answer to your query but there are some bone idle people in the careers office who will likely tell you "It says here GCSE so you must have have GCSE. See. Here. Computer says you must have GCSE".

If this is about your career, you owe it to yourself to maximise your chances.
 
#12
Forastero said:
BIPOLAR77 said:
Have you asked a careers office?
Do you EVER say anything else? If you can't offer anything useful, don't bother posting. :roll:
Point taken.

I merely wanted to establish if he has contacted a ACIO, and if indeed he has, what did they say?

He may have been informed that he is not eligible, and is finding another way 'in', no doubt quoting a post from an arrser to battle with.

Best to have ALL the information before making an informed decision
 
#13
EdwardCoke said:
IMO Get your quals assessed by NARIC. The careers office might of course know the answer to your query but there are some bone idle people in the careers office who will likely tell you "It says here GCSE so you must have have GCSE. See. Here. Computer says you must have GCSE".

If this is about your career, you owe it to yourself to maximise your chances.
I liked that, pretty accurate for some I ran into, NCO and Commissioned.
 
#14
The_Goon said:
EdwardCoke said:
IMO Get your quals assessed by NARIC. The careers office might of course know the answer to your query but there are some bone idle people in the careers office who will likely tell you "It says here GCSE so you must have have GCSE. See. Here. Computer says you must have GCSE".

If this is about your career, you owe it to yourself to maximise your chances.
I liked that, pretty accurate for some I ran into, NCO and Commissioned.
I think they use a system where grades equal points so you might be able to swing it that way? As far as i can remember off hand you need x number of ALIS points and x number of UCAS points regardless of whether or not you have a degree. Also, no offense intended, but at 25 you might want to get a move on, from all the ACA interviews, fam visits and trips to Westbury I've had they seemed to think I was slightly too old and I'm 22! I think the cut off point for sandhurst is 27.5 anyway.
 
#15
#16
paddi-8764 said:
Also, no offense intended, but at 25 you might want to get a move on, from all the ACA interviews, fam visits and trips to Westbury I've had they seemed to think I was slightly too old and I'm 22! I think the cut off point for sandhurst is 27.5 anyway.
Absolute bollocks. Sure, it doesn't help you to be older, but I've known a good number of people who still enter at 25+, and I recently heard that number is increasing (although I bet the economic crisis is going to drive more recent grads into RMAS). There are plenty of other ways to make up for a few extra years under your belt - being in great physical condition would surely be a must.

There might be a lower chance of finding sponsorship in the combat arms, but it's still down to you. There are people in the infantry who joined at 26 without a degree. The question is whether you have the right personality and whether you want it enough. If you want it enough, you'll try, and if you have the right personality, you'll find a place that fits you.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#17
I think it's very likely that your US degree would be given due weight and I doubt that the absence of GCSEs will be any hindrance but, as has been suggested, you would be well advised to consult with a careers officer to make sure. We certainly have a fair few officers who've come from outside the British educational system and I doubt they're too burdened with GCSEs either.
 
#18
D4VE said:
I was born in England and grew up there, but left to live in the US at 13, right before i would have taken my GCSEs. I went to a US university, did well and got a degree, and am now 25. I talked to a navy recruiter to see if it was possible to join up, since i have lived in the US so long (i now have US and British citizenship), and apparently it is fine since the US is and acceptable country or something like that.

My question is whether or not it would be possible for me to join as an officer without my GCSEs. I took the SATs in the states (did fiarly well) which would be the closest equivalent they have, but not quite the same.

thanks
You must have a High School Diploma or equivalent, right? Most British unis treat a decent HSD as equivalent to a decent spread of GCSEs; can't see why the Army would be any different, so there may not be a problem at all!

May depend on which US uni your degree is from, but providing it's an accredited institution there shouldn't be a problem: I've noticed more than a few grads of American universities in recent Sandhurst passing out lists.

Presumably you had to do Gen Ed/ Core Curriculum courses, including "math"/ quantitive reasoning; English/ "University Writing"; some science, arts/ humanities, social studies etc? Play to the obvious strength of the US university system: breadth of courses required in freshman/ sophomore years, and emphasise this in any application. If you look like a promising candidate, can't imagine these won't be accepted as more than adequate substitute for a few GCSEs!

Best wishes,

W_M.
 
#20
Always be prepared to seek a second opinion. Having been part of the 'body drain' to the States myself when 13 (my father was part of the 'brain drain'), I graduated from a top-100 US high school at the age of 18 with an exceptional cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in Humanities (English & English Lit), Higher Maths (or Math), Physics, Chemistry, Biology, French, Latin and several other advanced stream subjects. On my return to the UK, my particular Service's educational panel assessed these qualifications as the equivalent of GCE 'O' Levels rather than 'A' Levels. This decision not only determined my type of commission and options for specialisation but consequently affected my entire career. At the time I was grateful to be accepted but if I had known then what I know now, I might have put up a fight.

As things turned out, I have few regrets because I ended up doing what I wanted and in positions of Command, albeit in a niche specialisation. Incidentally, I eventually gained my post-graduate degree at personal expense while still serving at the age of 48.
 

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