Can I go to University after finishing my training?

Was that when you were at Gutersloh, mid-late 2000's? I seem to remember one of the mess doing that (or having just returned). Initials AB?

In 2019, paid as a Captain to ponce about with a load of young, impressionable females.

The jammy ****.
 
I am happily corrected and i shall let my Nephew know as well.

My Nephews position is that he joined the reserves whilst at Uni studying Physics and Maths, he has wanted to join the regular forces as an Officer ever since he started Cadets. He finished Cadets as a cadet SSGT, and joined the reserves as a soldier when he hit 18 and before starting Uni.

He was then advised that the path he chose has made his officer selection more difficult. If he had gone UOTC or as mentioned previously done a Gap Year commission, he would have a much easier path.
He may have been told that but it sounds more like the advisor has a chip on his shoulder about it. It's certainly not something I've ever encountrerd before.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
I am happily corrected and i shall let my Nephew know as well.

My Nephews position is that he joined the reserves whilst at Uni studying Physics and Maths, he has wanted to join the regular forces as an Officer ever since he started Cadets. He finished Cadets as a cadet SSGT, and joined the reserves as a soldier when he hit 18 and before starting Uni.

He was then advised that the path he chose has made his officer selection more difficult. If he had gone UOTC or as mentioned previously done a Gap Year commission, he would have a much easier path.
Pretty sure, from the opinion of two selection Captains at AOSB, that this isn't true. And basically the only place that matters in applying to Sandhurst is AOSB.

Given the often bad advice that comes from AFCOs and self-interested advice from Capita recruitment, it's much more likely that your nephew was badly advised, or misunderstood.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
One of my officers did Troop commander for 2 years then fucked off to uni in Birmingham at the Army expense, although I have no idea why he went or why the army let him

Being a young, fit bloke on a decent wedge, he was having a terrible time beating off the women with a shitty stick.
If he was a non-grad and it was a technical degree, then there has been a program that does that for a while. I mostly met REME and RE who were on it, but there are plenty of technical jobs in the RLC so would make sense.
 

DSJ

LE
Hi guys, just asking this because army website is shite so I’ve got no idea.

So I’m 19, and the clear plan for me is to become an infantry officer in the regulars, but as soon as my role as a platoon commander turns to more admin, I want to start pursuing a career in Law.

I’m hoping to be studying at Exeter or Durham but the only trouble is, I’ve got nine months of doing a job I hate, frankly I’d much rather be doing something much more worth my time in the military. Can I start training as a soldier at Catterick this academic year, then start my studies at university, on the understanding that I’ll join the reserves or something whilst there, and after university I’ll go to Sandhurst.
Cheers!


1) Slating the website of an organisation you are currently looking to join is not a good look.

2) Admin is a considerable - and essential - part of the job. Even as a Platoon Commander you will not be spending 2 years living in a trench fighting 'ze germans'. Reports, courses, welfare, discipline, training reports, range letters, last-minute 'requests' from your CoC... it'll happen, as sure as night follows day.

3) Everything in this post leaves a distinct 'it's all about me' attitude. This is unlikely to go over well in any one of the three services where, dare I say it, selflessness is considered to be an asset.

4) The Army is unlikely to see your request to b*gger off to law school after Catterick as realistic or in line with the needs of the service (see point 3). Also - why? You would only have just finished training and would not be in any sense of the word an experienced soldier.

5) Go to uni, do your law degree, research what you want to do in the army and reassess in a year. You may find your goals have changed. If law is not for you, the army will still be there. If the army is not for you, then vice versa.
 
I am happily corrected and i shall let my Nephew know as well.

My Nephews position is that he joined the reserves whilst at Uni studying Physics and Maths, he has wanted to join the regular forces as an Officer ever since he started Cadets. He finished Cadets as a cadet SSGT, and joined the reserves as a soldier when he hit 18 and before starting Uni.

He was then advised that the path he chose has made his officer selection more difficult. If he had gone UOTC or as mentioned previously done a Gap Year commission, he would have a much easier path.
UOTC might have been easier as these are units who's (almost) sole purposes is to help young men and women to navigate their way through the (complex) commissioning process and to train them accordingly. But still very do-able through Reserves.
 
If he was a non-grad and it was a technical degree, then there has been a program that does that for a while. I mostly met REME and RE who were on it, but there are plenty of technical jobs in the RLC so would make sense.

Im just facestalking him, in May 2020 he submitted his final paperwork for the year

Assignment title: Takeaway Assessment Submission.
Submission title: EC1CMS Exam.

**** knows what that means
 
3) Everything in this post leaves a distinct 'it's all about me' attitude. This is unlikely to go over well in any one of the three services where, dare I say it, selflessness is considered to be an asset.
I see him fighting to be the next CDS with that attitude.
 
He may have been told that but it sounds more like the advisor has a chip on his shoulder about it. It's certainly not something I've ever encountrerd before.


I encountered it. I failed at RCB. On return to my TA Battalion I was called to my CO for interview. His opinion, based on my report, copied to him, was that there were no good grounds for my failure. After a short conversation with me he phoned Westbury to confirm any additional reasons. I was in the room as he spoke. He was becoming agitated and angry but, being the gentleman he was, he was terse but polite. After he concluded the call he told me that it was ridiculous that if, 'in their opinion, you will make a good Parachute Regiment NCO' (I was a L/Cpl at the time) and had the required educational qualifications, that they would not accept me. His anger was based on the phrase used that I, 'did not have the edge required for commissioned service'. I subsequently discovered that he had had a similar conversation regarding a L/Cpl from another Company, where the phrase had been, that the individual had, 'too much of the Parachute Regiment NCO in him'.

In both these cases I believe it was service as an OR which counted against us. Perhaps the way we performed had been influenced in a way thought negative by the board but, perhaps it was simply a prejudice.

On my return I also visited my Schools Liaison Officer. He also informed that perhaps it would have been better had I not joined the TA and certainly not The Parachute Regiment.

The other NCO went on to be a SNCO and gain a Masters, MSc. in Strategic Studies, before I lost contact, and I was a WO2 and obtained two Masters degrees and a Doctorate in education. I think, in both cases, the COs view was likely to have been more valid than RCBs. But, of course, I was not privy to the considerations of the board.

It was a long time ago, but if that sort of flawed thinking is still going on, I am disappointed in the current culture of the selection process.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
I encountered it. I failed at RCB. On return to my TA Battalion I was called to my CO for interview. His opinion, based on my report, copied to him, was that there were no good grounds for my failure. After a short conversation with me he phoned Westbury to confirm any additional reasons. I was in the room as he spoke. He was becoming agitated and angry but, being the gentleman he was, he was terse but polite. After he concluded the call he told me that it was ridiculous that if, 'in their opinion, you will make a good Parachute Regiment NCO' (I was a L/Cpl at the time) and had the required educational qualifications, that they would not accept me. His anger was based on the phrase used that I, 'did not have the edge required for commissioned service'. I subsequently discovered that he had had a similar conversation regarding a L/Cpl from another Company, where the phrase had been, that the individual had, 'too much of the Parachute Regiment NCO in him'.

In both these cases I believe it was service as an OR which counted against us. Perhaps the way we performed had been influenced in a way thought negative by the board but, perhaps it was simply a prejudice.

On my return I also visited my Schools Liaison Officer. He also informed that perhaps it would have been better had I not joined the TA and certainly not The Parachute Regiment.

The other NCO went on to be a SNCO and gain a Masters, MSc. in Strategic Studies, before I lost contact, and I was a WO2 and obtained two Masters degrees and a Doctorate in education. I think, in both cases, the COs view was likely to have been more valid than RCBs. But, of course, I was not privy to the considerations of the board.

It was a long time ago, but if that sort of flawed thinking is still going on, I am disappointed in the current culture of the selection process.
How long ago was it? No evidence these days that culture is still there. First, they have a pretty rigorous points based system that doesn't actually allow much leeway for opinion from the DS. So those doing the lower down interviews (Capt and Maj / occasionally Lt Col) would have to carry that prejudice to throw the points for those interviews. That is very unlikely these days with officers entirely of the campaigning generation, who I'd suggest are more likely to have a pro-soldier bias than otherwise.

The older and stuffier types on the final board only really weigh in for edge cases, or when the quotas need adjusting, but in recent years those have been to let more in, not exclude them.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
During my tenure as a TA / AR Coy Comd, I supported junior ranks from my Coy to RMAS who subsequently commissioned into Parachute Regiment (as expected), AAC, RE and RA.

None of them were disadvantaged by their time in the Reserve, and some won Swords, Medals, Binos etc.

If you go from the AR and fail at AOSB, it is because you did not deliver what AOSB were looking for.
 
During my tenure as a TA / AR Coy Comd, I supported junior ranks from my Coy to RMAS who subsequently commissioned into Parachute Regiment (as expected), AAC, RE and RA.

None of them were disadvantaged by their time in the Reserve, and some won Swords, Medals, Binos etc.

If you go from the AR and fail at AOSB, it is because you did not deliver what AOSB were looking for.
I’m sure you’ve answered this before, but for those post AAPPS(R), would they have to do AAPPS as Regular Officers?
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Currently the average figure of OCdts from the ranks at Sandbags is 7% of the annual intake, so about 50 a year (not incl LE Officers). More power to their elbow, but I’d still recommend getting a degree first if you can. They are both different ways of achieving a Commission but the hurdles involved from the ranks are more difficult. Hence my respect for them.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
I’m sure you’ve answered this before, but for those post AAPPS(R), would they have to do AAPPS as Regular Officers?
Yes. However at least one did regular AAPS as an AR officer, with P Coy briefed to score him as if he was a regular officer. He passed on his second attempt, so went to RMAS as a safe bet for an airborne unit at interview.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
I'm going from the advice given to my nephew from his local AFCO. They implied that as he was an enlisted soldier in the reserves, his application would be managed as if he was going to Sandhurst from the ranks, instead of a direct applicant.

Ohh POD Course - Fun
 
Yes. However at least one did regular AAPS as an AR officer, with P Coy briefed to score him as if he was a regular officer. He passed on his second attempt, so went to RMAS as a safe bet for an airborne unit at interview.
Is that only for the Paras? I know at least one R Signals bloke who didn't have to re-do it.
 
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