Can I apply for a replacement set of my great uncle's medals?

#41
Well repros now would make a nice set as the recently issued set will be recently minted and look as genuine!l
That's what I was thinking. I'm going to let my credit card take the hit and buy good quality replicas. Then make a trip to Kew to get copies of his citations.
 

overopensights

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#44
Well Done, your perseverance certainly paid off.
I have just replaced some Naval Medals and an OBE (Not Mine) , I used 'Worcester Medal Service.' they're not expensive, and they're very helpful. They are by Royal Appointment' therefore they get it right. They will also engrave the No Rk and Name. They will quote you over the telephone. With a set like that I would consider Court Mounting?
 
#45
Well Done, your perseverance certainly paid off.
I have just replaced some Naval Medals and an OBE (Not Mine) , I used 'Worcester Medal Service.' they're not expensive, and they're very helpful. They are by Royal Appointment' therefore they get it right. They will also engrave the No Rk and Name. They will quote you over the telephone. With a set like that I would consider Court Mounting?
Not sure why the disagree from @Accidental_discharge, possibly because the Navy medals are traditionally swing mounted? I've been looking at Worcester Medals and will give them a bell tomorrow. Its going to be a fairly sharp pain in the wallet - that DSO is 200 quid on its own!
 

overopensights

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#46
Not sure why the disagree from @Accidental_discharge, possibly because the Navy medals are traditionally swing mounted? I've been looking at Worcester Medals and will give them a bell tomorrow. Its going to be a fairly sharp pain in the wallet - that DSO is 200 quid on its own!
My opinion comes from the fact that we have a 'once a week' Vets Breakfast Club, eighteen of us. We had a dinner night last year and the members medals were 'disgusting' I did the whole of them, some wanted remounting, some were the wrong order and others missing. I did them all via 'Worcestershire Medals' They really did me proud. Good luck with it, I think you will be pleasantry surprised regarding cost. An absolute perfect copy of a DSO from them is £57.00 plus an extra tenner for inscription.
 

ExREME..TECH

On ROPS
On ROPs
#47
My opinion comes from the fact that we have a 'once a week' Vets Breakfast Club, eighteen of us. We had a dinner night last year and the members medals were 'disgusting' I did the whole of them, some wanted remounting, some were the wrong order and others missing. I did them all via 'Worcestershire Medals' They really did me proud. Good luck with it, I think you will be pleasantry surprised regarding cost.
where are you?
 
#48
My opinion comes from the fact that we have a 'once a week' Vets Breakfast Club, eighteen of us. We had a dinner night last year and the members medals were 'disgusting' I did the whole of them, some wanted remounting, some were the wrong order and others missing. I did them all via 'Worcestershire Medals' They really did me proud. Good luck with it, I think you will be pleasantry surprised regarding cost. An absolute perfect copy of a DSO from them is £57.00 plus an extra tenner for inscription.
Are you sure? That seems to be the price for a miniature. Full size is £208.56!

Worcestershire Medal Service Limited
 

overopensights

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#49

overopensights

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#50
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#51
Not sure why the disagree from @Accidental_discharge, possibly because the Navy medals are traditionally swing mounted? I've been looking at Worcester Medals and will give them a bell tomorrow. Its going to be a fairly sharp pain in the wallet - that DSO is 200 quid on its own!
@brewmeister, it is possible that when I used my right thumb scrolling on my phone, I lingered too long on the like button, then inadvertently touched the disagree.
I have seen many Naval racks court mounted, either way looks fine.
Removed.
 
#52
Does the medal office keep stock of older medals, or are they minted on demand. I can imagine the WW2 campaign medals are reasonably common, but there must be an occasional requirement to issue some pretty obscure medals.

Really pleased to see @brewmeister's perseverance pay off.
*Anorak Alert*

WWII stars and medals are new strikes from existing dies, though they do differ slightly from contemporary post-WWII issues (the suspension ring on current stars is larger, for instance).

WWI stars and medals are no longer issued, though the dies exist. Having said that, there have been one or two examples of WWI medals being issued in recent years.

*/Anorak Alert*
 

Helm

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#53
@brewmeister, it is possible that when I used my right thumb scrolling on my phone, I lingered too long on the like button, then inadvertently touched the disagree.
I have seen many Naval racks court mounted, either way looks fine.
Removed.
Give me your password and I'll fix that for you ;) Great Job Brew keeps us updated on the final collection
 

overopensights

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#54
It is a thought to ponder when you consider that WW1 medals when issued in 1921 were all 'hand stamped' with No Rk Name and Regiment, and distributed to about 8 million men and women. Multiply that qty by three for those that got the full set.
 
#56
It is a thought to ponder when you consider that WW1 medals when issued in 1921 were all 'hand stamped' with No Rk Name and Regiment, and distributed to about 8 million men and women. Multiply that qty by three for those that got the full set.
Errm-not true, chap: WWI medals were impressed by machine. An operator would set the letters to denote the rank abbreviation, initials and last name (and, in the case of rank and file, the Service number) and would then operate the machine to press the letters and numbers into the metal.
 

overopensights

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#57
Errm-not true, chap: WWI medals were impressed by machine. An operator would set the letters to denote the rank abbreviation, initials and last name (and, in the case of rank and file, the Service number) and would then operate the machine to press the letters and numbers into the metal.
Errm-not true, chap: WWI medals were impressed by machine. An operator would set the letters to denote the rank abbreviation, initials and last name (and, in the case of rank and file, the Service number) and would then operate the machine to press the letters and numbers into the metal.
Still a lot of work! Is there a source for that info? I saw someting written at one time a long time ago, I also saw the detail for the 'Widow's Penny' which showed the named soldier, I think that was certainly hand done.
 
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#58
Still a lot of work! Is there a source for that info? I saw it written at one time, I also saw the detail for the 'Widow's Penny' which showed the named soldier, I think that was certainly hand done.
Again, not true: the Memorial Plaque was cast in bronze, though craftsmen did finish off and tidy up the individual plaques. Each plaque was cast individually as the man/woman's name had to be built up.

An exemplar is held at the V and A :

Next of Kin Memorial Plaque | Preston, Edward Carter | V&A Search the Collections

As to a source for the manner of naming the medals, it will be hidden away somewhere at TNA-in the past, I have also tripped over a specific link that gives the instruction as to how they were named but damned if I can remember where. The best I can do is IWM, which holds exemplars of WWI medals:

British First World War Service Medals
 

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