Can being a TA CMT lead to being a Paramedic in civvi street?

#1
Hello,

Can being a Combat Med Tech get you access into the ambulance service?
 
#3
No, it won't - which is why rickshaw mini-minor is an ODP these days, as that qualification is transferable.
 
#5
being a CMT counts for nothing in civi street, there is a course (about £2000) to become an ambulance technician(a qualification that soon won't be recognised by the NHS) from CMT.
 
#9
Seems a strange situation that you can spend your entire career recognising and treating illness and injury in at times, remote and difficult situations, but when you leave the army the knowledge and skills you have accumulated aren't recognised or valued. There must be somewhere you can take them.
 
#10
Seems a strange situation that you can spend your entire career recognising and treating illness and injury in at times, remote and difficult situations, but when you leave the army the knowledge and skills you have accumulated aren't recognised or valued. There must be somewhere you can take them.
If you're class 1 or other service equivalent, Offshore medic
 
#11
You'll be needing to pop off to uni for three years...
Or 2 years,after competing with about 800 others to gain your place at one of the limited Universities that cover the course.

And don't forget to put money aside for petrol and running your car to get to placements,which is about 50% of the degree.

The one good thing once you qualify is that it is recognised as a qualification worldwide.
 
#12
Or 2 years,after competing with about 800 others to gain your place at one of the limited Universities that cover the course.

And don't forget to put money aside for petrol and running your car to get to placements,which is about 50% of the degree.

The one good thing once you qualify is that it is recognised as a qualification worldwide.
Recognised? Yep, maybe, but only just. Your licence to practice only extends to the UK, so if you intend to work elsewhere, you'll have to sit the local exams and meet their criteria, which often means going through their training courses.

Unless that is, you're working exclusively for an employer in say the O&G industry - so a rig or mine somewhere, then things are a tad different.

But if you're a UK paramedic, don't expect to walk into an ambulance job in 'the colonies' without requalifying......
 
#15
How perfectly they stag on the DEFAC on H17 too the pretty little dears.

Perhaps we could get them to do some other important tasks, like getting the brews on, if of course they're not too busy wiping bottoms...
And the injustice of it all is?????

They're commisionable
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
#16
How perfectly they stag on the DEFAC on H17 too the pretty little dears.

Perhaps we could get them to do some other important tasks, like getting the brews on, if of course they're not too busy wiping bottoms...
Pretty littler dears? Put brews on? Wipe bottoms?

Man, you've obviously never SEEN a real nurse.

None of the above true.

Overweight harridan who will do **** all for anyone is much closer to the mark.

I went out with one who expected me to reach over her to hand her the phone when it was ringing.

Gen dit.
 
#18
Hi,

This is my experience of getting into the ambulance service.

I was a TA driver for 4 years, during which time I gained my cat C license. When I decided that I wanted to be a paramedic I searched the NHS jobs website daily for student paramedic jobs across the whole country and was willing to relocate anywhere to do it. I couldn't afford to go to university and live so I was looking for ambulance services that employed you full time while you studied part time (with the open university over a 4 year period).

After one rejection for even a Patient Transport Service job I submitted an application for a student paramedic job on the south coast for which I was invited to interview and other selection.

During the interview I spoke about my past and spoke briefly about the TA. They were interested to hear more so I gave an honest account of what we did and played up the battlefield casualty drills bit. I was up against regular army medics, ex-marines and all sorts of other people who I thought stood a better chance than me but I got one of 12 positions out of 1000+ initial applicants and about 700 who were chosen for selection.

What I'm getting at is that it's not important that you become a CMT - that alone won't excite your interviewers as there are A LOT of ex-regular CMT's and other forces folk applying to ambulance services. You need to be able to elaborate on how the training you have received has made you the right candidate for the job (whether that is medical training or not). I really sold the BCD stuff to them; not the technicality of the interventions we provided but how we were put into high pressure situations with a casualty and had to calmly provide the correct treatment. Then I used my civvie job as evidence of how I could deal with people of different ages, races, backgrounds etc.

The TA was useful because it gave me my cat C license (C1 is required to drive ambulances). The interviewers were interested in how the training changed me and how I used it to grow, rather than what the training itself actually was.

That's a really long drawn out way of saying don't commit to being a CMT if you only want to use it as a stepping stone into the ambulance service. Pick a trade you would enjoy and think about what your potential employer wants to see on the application form from potential candidates.
 

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