Can another generation sustain rememberance?

#1
Amazing scenes as usual at the cenotaph and around the country.

Given that 100 years has now passed since the end of WW1 and there are no surviving veterans, as well as the fact that WW2 veterans are almost certainly in the 80-90 years age group would it now be the time to wind down the mass parades?

A simpler format perhaps, Kings troop with a xx gun salute at the 11th hour, the monarch and heads of the armed forces at the cenotaph, short wreath laying ceremony .

Certainly in my local area speaking to some young ones they really do not know at which point the "wake" should end. How long since Agincourt, Trafalgar, Waterloo.

edit to correct my math's.
 
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#2
Amazing scenes as usual at the cenotaph and around the country.

Given that 100 years has now passed since the end of WW1 and there are no surviving veterans, as well as the fact that WW2 veterans are almost certainly in the 70-90 years age group would it now be the time to wind down the mass parades?

A simpler format perhaps, Kings troop with a xx gun salute at the 11th hour, the monarch and heads of the armed forces at the cenotaph, short wreath laying ceremony .

Certainly in my local area speaking to some young ones they really do not know at which point the "wake" should end. How long since Agincourt, Trafalgar, Waterloo.
It's not just about WW1 though.
 
#3
WW2 just around the corner and a lot closer to home.
 
#4
WW2 vets in 70 to 90 age range? Anyone who's 70 (like me) would have been born 3 years after that particular war ended.
More like the 90 to 100 age (some could have sneaked in and lied about their age but they'd still be 88 .

Plus we remember those from other conflicts a bit more recent.
 
#5
........ WW2 veterans are almost certainly in the 70-90 years age group ......
Actually an eighteen year-old* in 1945 would be ninety-one in 2018, therefore the remaining veterans are in the 90+ age bracket. Edit - beaten by @exbleep

But, given the fact that since WW2, there has been ongoing conflict and sacrifice by HM Armed Forces around the world and an increased media coverage thereof, linked with an increased public intolerance of casualty figures; I would hazard a guess that this ceremony is likely to be carried out for the foreseeable future.

*Yes I know that there will always be some younger lads that saw active service.
 
#6
There are still a few survivors of WW2 about.
There are surviving veterans from conflicts in Korea, Palestine, Malaya, Kenya, Aden, Cyprus, Northern Ireland, Falklands, Oman, Bosnia/Kosovo, Gulf Wars 1&2, Afghanistan, and a few more I've probably missed.
There may have been naval and SF losses we don't know about, but their mates will.
There are the many that died in peacetime from RTAs, accidents or whatever.

While the Great War affected most families in Britain and the Empire, the later ones still left widows and kids, relatives and friends, who perhaps take some small comfort from national and local remembrance parades?
 
#7
WW2 vets in 70 to 90 age range? Anyone who's 70 (like me) would have been born 3 years after that particular war ended.
More like the 90 to 100 age (some could have sneaked in and lied about their age but they'd still be 88 .

Plus we remember those from other conflicts a bit more recent.
my math's are crap! Also being 69 I should have clicked.
 
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#8
Points taken, how ever the question was can/will another generation continue to sustain the level of respect being shown now, in comparing the huge casualty figures from the world wars all of the others pale on a global scale.

Like many families mine lost menfolk in both conflicts, but when I am gone no one will make any effort to remember them as individuals.
 
#10
In another 20 or 30 years, World War One will be forgotten, just like the Napoloenic Wars and Nelsonian Navy are today. Long forgotten.
 
#11
As @Zag42 alluded to, despite the 11/11/11 reference it's not only about WWI.

I personally "remembered" those friends of mine who fell in Iraq and Afghanistan. No doubt others thought on those who left us in Korea, Borneo, Malaya, the Falklands and those daft little training accidents that take people away from us.
 

Waz

Old-Salt
#13
No it won't be sustained I fear. Not because of how long ago it was, but because the current generation want us to be ashamed of our history. The same history that gave them the right to be such fannies.
 
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#14
The greatest danger to remembering is the left wing revisionists wish to re write history in their own likeness.
 
#15
No it won't be sustained I fear. Not because of how long it was, but because the current generation want us to be ashamed of our history. The same history that gave them the right to be such fannies.
The story of its ruin is simple and obvious; and, instead of inquiring why the Roman empire was destroyed, we should rather be surprised that it had subsisted so long. The victorious legions, who, in distant wars, acquired the vices of strangers and mercenaries, first oppressed the freedom of the republic, and afterwards violated the majesty of the purple. The emperors, anxious for their personal safety and the public peace, were reduced to the base expedient of corrupting the discipline which rendered them alike formidable to their sovereign and to the enemy; the vigour of the military government was relaxed, and finally dissolved, by the partial institutions of Constantine; and the Roman world was overwhelmed by a deluge of Barbarians.
 
#16
Things are already changing. Most local parades are organised by civvies. Its the civvies that decide how they are run. Hence in the parade I was at yesterday the order of presidence is RBL, scouts, navy, army and RAF (in the arguement between scout leader and WO1 the scout leader won as he just wouldnt back down). The RBL is mainly the bikers with the patch vest things (not complaining just saying how its changed). The two minutes silence was actually about 20 seconds between the slightly strange very long civvie played last post and the random piper playing through it. But the turn out was fantastic.

Its still going to happen but its going to change into something new that will not be controlled by the military for the most part.

Plus there will be another big conflict in the future.

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
 
#18
Amazing scenes as usual at the cenotaph and around the country.

Given that 100 years has now passed since the end of WW1 and there are no surviving veterans, as well as the fact that WW2 veterans are almost certainly in the 80-90 years age group would it now be the time to wind down the mass parades?

A simpler format perhaps, Kings troop with a xx gun salute at the 11th hour, the monarch and heads of the armed forces at the cenotaph, short wreath laying ceremony .

Certainly in my local area speaking to some young ones they really do not know at which point the "wake" should end. How long since Agincourt, Trafalgar, Waterloo.

edit to correct my math's.
Oddly enough a few of us were discussing this on Sunday, I reckon interest will wane as those who did their conscription start dying off. In the 80s when I was a kid, almost every single adult knew a soldier/veteran who was in their family. Nowadays the WW2 vets are all in their 90s and dying off and even those who did conscription are generally older than 76 add to the fact that Army recruiting is only about 12k a year means those with a living connection with the armed forces gets smaller every year.
Most people wont care in a couple of decades.
 
#19
Certainly in my local area speaking to some young ones they really do not know at which point the "wake" should end. How long since Agincourt, Trafalgar, Waterloo.
As significant as Agincourt, Trafalgar and Waterloo were, they were battles. WW1 was a global war over 4 years. It was the first industrial war and the memorials in nearly every city, town and village in the UK and Ireland are testament to the loss of life. It was also the first war to have significant film footage, in addition to the audio we have, thus ensuring a lasting memory for future generations.
If last weekend was anything to go by, the youngsters are engaging in the history and the tradition of remembrance. As long as that is the case, we will continue to remember them.
 
#20
How far is Waterloo Station from Trafalgar Square?

On the topic, I suspect the 11 November event will still exist, but become more low-key, once HRH QE2 passes on.
I think a lot of things will change one EIIR leaves this veil of tears. The Monarchy is an irrelevance to a lot of the younger generation, added to the number people in the UK now who are 2nd & 3rd generation immigrants, just seems to me that Brenda will be the last high profile member of the firm
 

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