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Cam nets in British Armoured units in Normandy/NW Europe 1944

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
Chaps, does anybody know whether British armoured units in Normandy and Western Europe use cam nets on their vehicles?
I’m currently in the middle of building a model diorama of a Cromwell and am putting together some stowage for it and one bit of it would be a cam net.
The only thing is that I’ve not been able to find a photo of a British tank carrying or underneath one.
If anyone can point me in the right direction I would be grateful.
Thanks in advance.
 
Plenty of imagery out there of Sherman Fireflys in particular liberally drapped in cam nets to break up their distinctive outline. Seems to have become quite common across all British tanks quite quickly.
 
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On the move they appear to drape the cam net around the turret area
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
Thanks chaps. I’ve seen some photos of armour on the move but none where they are lay up with the cam net being used much in the same way we cammed up our vehicles. I was wondering if they ever did that or, because of air superiority in France etc, they didn’t feel the need.

Edit: just seen @FourZeroCharlie picture.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Thanks chaps. I’ve seen some photos of armour on the move but none where they are lay up with the cam net being used much in the same way we cammed up our vehicles. I was wondering if they ever did that or, because of air superiority in France etc, they didn’t feel the need.

Edit: just seen @FourZeroCharlie picture.

German artillery spotters, and air superiority wasn't total, more local if the RAF happened to be overhead..
German fighter bombers and Light bombers were a constant threat.
 
German artillery spotters, and air superiority wasn't total, more local if the RAF happened to be overhead..
German fighter bombers and Light bombers were a constant threat.

When the RAF was overhead, the Germans ducked. When the Germans were overhead, the Allies ducked. When the USAAF were overhead .... everybody ducked.


eta - this 'quote' is attributed to a German commander when asked about the effect of Allied air power in Normandy
 
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When the RAF was overhead, the Germans ducked. When the Germans were overhead, the Allies ducked. When the USAAF were overhead .... everybody ducked.

We jest, but blue on blues were enough of an issue for Large bright coloured identification panels to be issued to everyone in 1944. Didn’t seem to bother the American pilots overly mind, their tendency to treat everything forward of their airfield as ‘Indian country’ was well noted..
I’ve seen references that US ground troops often took no chances, and any American plane not clearly signalling friendly intent was opened up on.

so @Stumpy4154 , you need to look up those panels for a properly accurate on the move look.
 
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Ref blue on Blue, my great uncles tank crew were lucky in that they were rocketed by a Typhoon with the rockets landing all around the tank. Knocking it about a fair bit, (Bounced us like dried peas in can lad were his words)
He wasn't a fan of the RAF or the USAAF.
His unit got strafed in North Africa too by the RAF.
 
We jest, but blue on blues were enough of an issue for Large bright coloured identification panels to be issued to everyone in 1944. Didn’t seem to bother the American pilots overly mind, their tendency to treat everything forward of their airfield as ‘Indian country’ was well noted..
I’ve seen references that US ground troops often took no chances, and any American plane not clearly signalling friendly intent was opened up on.

so @Stumpy4154 , you need to look up those panels for a properly accurate on the move look.

I seem to recall there was a standard smoke signal to ID friendly units to attacking aircraft. Memory says it was Yellow smoke. So it seems to have happened often enough.
There's an account in Boscawen's Armoured Guardsman.
 
I seem to recall there was a standard smoke signal to ID friendly units to attacking aircraft. Memory says it was Yellow smoke. So it seems to have happened often enough.
There's an account in Boscawen's Armoured Guardsman.
Yes, normally yellow smoke. However, the use of yellow merely increased the tragedy when a Bomber Command mission in support of the Normandy breakout efforts went horribly wrong. Some of the Pathfinders laid their Target Markers correctly on the German front line. However, some Target Markers landed amongst (IIRC) Canadian artillery. They promptly popped smoke. Now, if the aircraft had been from 2nd Tactical Air Force or 9th USAF, chances are that would have helped. Unfortunately, yellow markers were usually used in Bomber Command for the Master Bomber to mark the best laid Target Markers. So most of the Main Force bombers dropped on the wrong set of Target Markers. We are talking a lot of bombs...
 
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