Calling prison officers.

I've often said that our healthcare will end up killing someone.
I've seen the orderly officer frantically phoning round to get a first aid trained member of staff to attend another member of staff having a suspected heart attack.
Healthcare refused to treat him because he wasn't an offender. Don't nurses sign up to the Hippocratic oath?
I've taken a prisoner out on an emergency escort with a "badly lacerated finger". After four hours in A & E, the nurse removed the dressing to reveal what most people would have put under the tap & then shoved a plaster on for a couple of days. I felt obliged to apologise for wasting their time & tax payers money.
I've seen knife wounds that needed stitching treated with a plaster. I've seen a prisoner having a fit (not spice related, but the worst I've ever seen) & all the two nurses could do was stand there crying, etc, etc, etc.
Due to the "nationality" of most of the nurses, it's hard enough to understand what they're saying face to face never mind on the radio.

Unsurprisingly, healthcare here is provided by a private company. Cheaper apparently.

Needless to say, SOP now for staff injuries or ailments is to ignore healthcare & deal with it ourselves. Should the situation warrant it, blue light ambulance.
Spot on. Large Victorian?
 
As someone mentioned, private prisons do have an attached controller, who work for the MOJ/ or Home Office. I seem to recall that private prisons get fines for such things as late roll checks, but I may be mistaken.

I have worked, albeit for a short time,in both, public sector and private prisons.

It's easier to get promoted in the private estate and the wages are pretty much on par to HMPS, sometimes even better. Also, apart from HMP Birmingham, private prisons are generally modern with better facilities.

Only real difference is private officers don't carry batons or wear epaulettes. Or get a civil servant pension.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
I've often said that our healthcare will end up killing someone.
I've seen the orderly officer frantically phoning round to get a first aid trained member of staff to attend another member of staff having a suspected heart attack.
Healthcare refused to treat him because he wasn't an offender. Don't nurses sign up to the Hippocratic oath?
I've taken a prisoner out on an emergency escort with a "badly lacerated finger". After four hours in A & E, the nurse removed the dressing to reveal what most people would have put under the tap & then shoved a plaster on for a couple of days. I felt obliged to apologise for wasting their time & tax payers money.
I've seen knife wounds that needed stitching treated with a plaster. I've seen a prisoner having a fit (not spice related, but the worst I've ever seen) & all the two nurses could do was stand there crying, etc, etc, etc.
Due to the "nationality" of most of the nurses, it's hard enough to understand what they're saying face to face never mind on the radio.

Unsurprisingly, healthcare here is provided by a private company. Cheaper apparently.

Needless to say, SOP now for staff injuries or ailments is to ignore healthcare & deal with it ourselves. Should the situation warrant it, blue light ambulance.
If you think any nursing staff aren't fit then report them to the Nursing and midwifery council, it's not unkown (OK it's a huge problem) for certain sectors of our community to share a registration.
I don't think a member of staff is a patient, however nurses must act and treat people in any emergency situation within their scope of practice and competence.
 
Not to long ago a nurse in a YOI rather close to heathrow was found to be completely fake, only when a new company took over the contract was she found out after several years working there that she had no qualifications. Oh and there was incident couple months ago when a Y.P was badly burnt with hot water straight from a kettle, healthcare was called a nurse eventually turned up announced it was her lunch time then wondered off.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Not to long ago a nurse in a YOI rather close to heathrow was found to be completely fake, only when a new company took over the contract was she found out after several years working there that she had no qualifications. Oh and there was incident couple months ago when a Y.P was badly burnt with hot water straight from a kettle, healthcare was called a nurse eventually turned up announced it was her lunch time then wondered off.
Should have been reported to the NMC by the end of the day.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Not to long ago a nurse in a YOI rather close to heathrow was found to be completely fake, only when a new company took over the contract was she found out after several years working there that she had no qualifications. Oh and there was incident couple months ago when a Y.P was badly burnt with hot water straight from a kettle, healthcare was called a nurse eventually turned up announced it was her lunch time then wondered off.
Loads of them, often one will have a registration and loads more use it, apply for jobs out of the way, never in an acute hospital, prison, nursing home, night duty, racist to complain of course.
 
Is there any specific nationality prone to this type of situation?
FlipFlop for example?
 
If you think any nursing staff aren't fit then report them to the Nursing and midwifery council, it's not unkown (OK it's a huge problem) for certain sectors of our community to share a registration.
I don't think a member of staff is a patient, however nurses must act and treat people in any emergency situation within their scope of practice and competence.
Your second paragraph probably sums it up nicely.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Don't expect too much, don't expect too much digging due to perceived racism, already far too many fitness to practice hearings are from Non-English, shocking.
Oh indeed, it's bad enough geting a UK born nurse investigated, and the employers are complaining about IELTS, ffs if people can't speak understand or communicate in English then they are dangerous.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Oh indeed, it's bad enough geting a UK born nurse investigated, and the employers are complaining about IELTS, ffs if people can't speak understand or communicate in English then they are dangerous.
Oh it takes a long time but hearings balance on whether it rained that year, get them to a hearing they're screwed
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Oh it takes a long time but hearings balance on whether it rained that year, get them to a hearing they're screwed
Nees to be more hearings than there is, we need to weedout the incompetants in the profession. They bring us all into disrepute. I suspect many very high nurse managers in the NHS would not bear any investigation into some of the things they are responsible for in their trusts.
 
On the plus side, it seems the customers of the prison have learnt about gender equality - although the prison officer herself still needs admittance to the re-education facilities:-

"They're not bothered if you're female or male; they have no respect regardless if you're female," she told BBC Radio 5 live
So, theres a positive story in there which the BBC should really be highlighting!
 

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