Calling prison officers.

#1
Someone I work with is looking to go into the prison service under a scheme called 'unlocked' when she finishes her degree, and was wondering what it's really like.

I will be showing her this thread, so some sensible advice in between requests for pics of her tits would be welcome.

I will be advising her on persec, as she might be working with some of you degenerates at some point.
 
#3
She needs to be aware that at this time, The Prison Service is in absolute crisis.
The current retention rate after one year is around sixteen per cent.
Staff assaults are through the roof as are self harm incidents & deaths in custody.
She should also be aware that what once were called prisoners & then offenders, are now referred to as "the men in our care".
This is due to the liberal attitude that is endemic in all areas of the service.
 
#4
Tell her to get a job in either Lidl, Aldi graduate entry circaa 45k.
 
#5
Tell her to choose another profession, unless "unlocked" is a euphamism for junior governors that don't actually work with prisoners but get to (mis)manage those that do, then it's easy money from what I saw.
 
#8
I work with an ex prison officer, he's about 5'7". He had to rescue a 6'4" officer from a situation, which involved the scrot... prisoner ending up on the floor hurting. 6'4" bloke also works at our place, but in a different area. On one of the other shifts there is also an ex prison officer. Others have given a good reasons why prison officer leave. I know of three to back this up.

RP.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#11
Prisons are full of drugs, Zombie monsters on spice, creating havoc. Not enough staff to control anything daily attacks on staff.
Smoking ban means more riots and tobacco costs same as heroin soon.
Terms and conditions are shit, do something else.
 
#12
Sorry if my earlier post sounded a bit depressing as regards HMPPS as a career. More of the same I'm afraid......
The amount of paperwork is immense & the new "key worker" scheme which involves officers more than before in rehabilitation, will only increase the workload of wing officers. The problem is, to my mind anyway, more important security based aspects of the job are being short cut or just glossed over.
Longer serving staff have good pay & a good pension to look forward to & that's why most stay, me included.
Newer staff's pay is nowhere near as good, nor is the pension. They are being given responsibilities that are dangerously beyond their capabilities.
At a few select jails where recruiting staff is especially difficult, the starting pay is quite generous. The retention rate, however, is no better.
Added to the staffing problem, is that once a jail is considered fully staffed, some staff will be sent to other jails which are even worse off. This will then cause the fully staffed jail to be under staffed. The whole system is a vicious circle.
I know of one large prison in the midlands where eighty per cent of the staff have under two years service.
Under "unlocked", she can expect no better starting pay & conditions than a non-graduate.
The situation has changed beyond recognition from what it was five years ago. What happens now would have been unthinkable then.
HMPPS is a ticking time bomb which is largely ignored by the politicians.
It'll go off sooner rather than later & it won't be pretty.

Edited to add: My username reflects my job.
 
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#13
Tell her to get a job in either Lidl, Aldi graduate entry circaa 45k.
I saw some jobs coming up at an Aldi warehouse in my local town, pay for a section supervisor between 35,000-40,000 but a 48 hour week. Now it is 6,000 more than I get at the moment but 12 hours a week more.

Working at ALDI: 683 Reviews | Indeed.co.uk

Seems to be good money but they work you into the ground.
 
#14
I saw some jobs coming up at an Aldi warehouse in my local town, pay for a section supervisor between 35,000-40,000 but a 48 hour week. Now it is 6,000 more than I get at the moment but 12 hours a week more.

Working at ALDI: 683 Reviews | Indeed.co.uk

Seems to be good money but they work you into the ground.
Apparently they do, but have good benefits. Private health care, audi a4.

My sister works for them, Area Manager been there for 6 years, on close to 60k. Doing office type work. Going to the USA for two years, then back for a ops position. 110k. Not bad for a classical arts degree.

She is a precious snow flake though.
 
#15
I saw some jobs coming up at an Aldi warehouse in my local town, pay for a section supervisor between 35,000-40,000 but a 48 hour week. Now it is 6,000 more than I get at the moment but 12 hours a week more.

Working at ALDI: 683 Reviews | Indeed.co.uk

Seems to be good money but they work you into the ground.
job came up the other day £45,000 for driving a fuel tanker. I've also heard of £750 a week for driving a non-ADR C+E truck (about £36,000).
 
#16
I read the blurb on some of Aldis graduate jobs , start on 45k with Audi A4 and you will be on 75k in 4 years .

I expect its hard work but that never killed anyone . Better than getting battered or having to do with nasty stuff !
 
#17
As a ex SNCO who joined the HM Prison Service in 1986, (pre Fresh Start) on the old conditions of service, and having seen the Government, Senior Management, Junior Management and anybody else involved in the Criminal Justice System crap on the uniformed staff I would suggest she looks for employment else where.

At my old establishment which was receiving additional local living allowances to retain staff a vast number resigned, or were dismissed and now work for various railway companies and Network Rail.
 
#20
Prisons are full of drugs, Zombie monsters on spice, creating havoc. Not enough staff to control anything daily attacks on staff.
Smoking ban means more riots and tobacco costs same as heroin soon.
Terms and conditions are shit, do something else.
Hence I'd see it as a last resort rather than a choice career.
 

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