Call to ban army recruiters from schools in scotland?

#1
Ban army recruiters in schools: MSPMay 17 2006







An SNP MSP has urged council chiefs to stop army recruitment teams from visiting schools after an increase of almost 1,000% in such exercises in the past three years.

Christine Grahame said figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show the number of regimental recruitment team visits schools rose from 14 in 2003-04 to 153 by March in the 2005/2006 financial year.

The rise reflects the "growing desperation" of Army chiefs, who are unable to maintain recruitment numbers through conventional methods and now target schools in deprived areas, the South of Scotland MSP said.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#2
Has she got a point? I think so, despite what we feel about it. 14 visits to 153? There's no getting away from it, that does reflect how desperate we are for new blood. As a matter of interest, I wonder if the Navy and the RAF increased thier school visits? The upside though, is those who join from the 'deprived' areas certainly get the benefit from doing so. i haven't met a single soul from a council estate that has regretted joining. Most say they'd do it again if given the chance.

What's the state of play south of the border?
 
#3
Are the recruitment difficulties worse in Scotland than in the rest of the UK? If so, does this reflect a growing disassociation between young Scots and the 'United Kingdom', or what?
 
#4
Hang on; how many schools (i.e. secondary, colleges etc) are there in Scotland? If each school only had one visit per year, I'm sure the number would be higher than 153. The question should be; why were only 14 schools visited in Scotland the previous year? Obviously it was a dastardly attempt to keep the Jocks out of employment!!
 
#6
Half the battle is educating the teaching staff as to what we have to offer and by allowing us to use just ten minutes in an assembly we can then identify individuals who would like to hear an in depth careers presentation at a later date. Spoke to the other services and the fact that they aren't as undermanned in areas as the army are, they do not perform as many school visits in this particular area!
 
#7
I remember the 1 A and SH RIT, assisting local secondary schools with their problem kids, They would take them for a day and put them through mini assault courses and such. Then they would sit in a classroom and do school work assisted by the RIT and teachers. An excelent scheme, which helped the kids.
 
#8
Quick google search shows 443 secondary schools in Scotland; so we ONLY visited a third of them!

I suspect that number of 14 is either incorrect or the initial question was worded specifically to guarantee a 'bad' looking number.
 
#9
Why does it matter? Does she disapprove of the military? Why would she not want the recruiting, for many it provides education a steady job and broadens horizons.
 
#10
who are unable to maintain recruitment numbers through conventional methods
And there was me thinking School visits had been a conventional method since WW1. Well well well , the things you learn eh?
 
#11
Being in the recruiting world, alot of our time in schools is spent offering assistance in delivering the national curiculum, ie Citizenship!! I think this person is just bumping her gums about something she clearly knows nothing about, or (being SNP) isn't the BRITISH Army's biggest fan!!!
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#12
AndyPipkin said:
Are the recruitment difficulties worse in Scotland than in the rest of the UK? If so, does this reflect a growing disassociation between young Scots and the 'United Kingdom', or what?
The Army used to be a very popular employer in Scotland. Regardless, the current attitude of Jock youth is not 'anti British' it's more that todays dissaffected youth in Scotland just aren't interested anymore. It's just not their thing. The local colleges are offering qualifications which kids consider more useable than those offered by the mob. Attitudes are not as they were either and they just aren't as robust as those of a similar age were even 10 years ago. Why join the Army and get f*cked about (general perception) when 'I can stay at my mum's, go to college if I feel like it and claim the dole if it all goes tits up'. There's also a lot of bad press floating around and the piece in question here, doesn't do anything to change attitudes. Parents reading that who were on the brink, will sway against their offspring joining up on the back of observations like this.

It's a shame but you reap as you sow. The Army just doesn't cut it in Scotland today. A career until you are 40? It's hardly an attrcative offer is it? Kids want more for less. The Government haven't helped the situation, in fact I believe that they have added to the problem. It's not just Iraq, it's how soldiers are treated in general. Deepcut (they may not know the full facts but that's how it is) has had an adverse affect and the press haven't and won't do us any favours.

I have to agree with her observation though despite the mathmaticians amongst you working out what the school to visit ratio is, you have to agree that there's been a hell of an increase.
 
#13
I seriously doubt the figure of 14. Unless of course the various RRTs were actually deployed on Ops that year (2003, nothing happened then surely?).

I find it interesting there is no mention of the previous year, nor the year in between. Was, as I suspect, 2003 an odd year or a statistical c0ck up?
 
#14
Its not like the shilling in the pint glass or press ganging

What exactly is her issue
 
#15
#16
#17
My mother is an assistant head in a secondary school on the outskirts of glasgow. She said that the parents and teachers assosiation had banned all the services from marketing themselves in the school because the pta thought they all ready had enough advertisements on T.v, internet e.t.c
 
#18
Pinched from rumration my bold

http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/57800.html

"Britain's military is struggling to meet its commitments because of "serious manning shortfalls" in 80 key areas, according to the Armed Forces Pay Review Body.
The Army, the most over-stretched of the three services, predicts a shortfall of 12,400 volunteers this year, despite a £9m advertising campaign aimed at reversing the trend.
The AFPRB says the overall manning level of 98.3% "masks serious shortages across a range of trades and areas" representing 27% of the RAF, 15% of the Royal Navy and 12% of the Army. The numbers opting to leave early are also increasing steadily, the report said.
The Army is short of engineers, electricians, logistics specialists, signallers, medical personnel and intelligence analysts, while the navy was facing a 35-50% deficit of middle-management petty officers in the next 10 years.
The report said: "Increasingly, personnel feel they are being taken for granted and undervalued by the nation."
The Ministry of Defence yesterday said overall manning levels were adequate, but acknowledged "pinch-points" existed in specialist areas.
Meanwhile, campaigners against the war in Iraq yesterday said they would picket schools where the army was trying to recruit pupils.
Rose Gentle, from Pollok in Glasgow, whose 19-year-old son Gordon was killed in Iraq, said she and others were ready to protest to stop the army approaching under-18s.
MSPs Christine Grahame, of the SNP, Colin Fox of the SSP, and Chris Ballance of the Greens – yesterday prepared a letter for every high school in Scotland. They said schools allowing the Army to recruit on site would be asked to allow anti-war campaigners to visit in the interests of balance.
An Army spokeswoman said: "We are not doing anything wrong, and we are absolutely not recruiting children."
Britain's military is struggling to meet its commitments because of "serious manning shortfalls" in 80 key areas, according to the Armed Forces Pay Review Body.
The Army, the most over-stretched of the three services, predicts a shortfall of 12,400 volunteers this year, despite a £9m advertising campaign aimed at reversing the trend.
The AFPRB says the overall manning level of 98.3% "masks serious shortages across a range of trades and areas" representing 27% of the RAF, 15% of the Royal Navy and 12% of the Army. The numbers opting to leave early are also increasing steadily, the report said.
The Army is short of engineers, electricians, logistics specialists, signallers, medical personnel and intelligence analysts, while the navy was facing a 35-50% deficit of middle-management petty officers in the next 10 years.
The report said: "Increasingly, personnel feel they are being taken for granted and undervalued by the nation."
The Ministry of Defence yesterday said overall manning levels were adequate, but acknowledged "pinch-points" existed in specialist areas.
Meanwhile, campaigners against the war in Iraq yesterday said they would picket schools where the army was trying to recruit pupils.
Rose Gentle, from Pollok in Glasgow, whose 19-year-old son Gordon was killed in Iraq, said she and others were ready to protest to stop the army approaching under-18s.
MSPs Christine Grahame, of the SNP, Colin Fox of the SSP, and Chris Ballance of the Greens – yesterday prepared a letter for every high school in Scotland. They said schools allowing the Army to recruit on site would be asked to allow anti-war campaigners to visit in the interests of balance.
An Army spokeswoman said: "We are not doing anything wrong, and we are absolutely not recruiting children."
Britain's military is struggling to meet its commitments because of "serious manning shortfalls" in 80 key areas, according to the Armed Forces Pay Review Body.
The Army, the most over-stretched of the three services, predicts a shortfall of 12,400 volunteers this year, despite a £9m advertising campaign aimed at reversing the trend.
The AFPRB says the overall manning level of 98.3% "masks serious shortages across a range of trades and areas" representing 27% of the RAF, 15% of the Royal Navy and 12% of the Army. The numbers opting to leave early are also increasing steadily, the report said.
The Army is short of engineers, electricians, logistics specialists, signallers, medical personnel and intelligence analysts, while the navy was facing a 35-50% deficit of middle-management petty officers in the next 10 years.
The report said: "Increasingly, personnel feel they are being taken for granted and undervalued by the nation."
The Ministry of Defence yesterday said overall manning levels were adequate, but acknowledged "pinch-points" existed in specialist areas.
Meanwhile, campaigners against the war in Iraq yesterday said they would picket schools where the army was trying to recruit pupils.
Rose Gentle, from Pollok in Glasgow, whose 19-year-old son Gordon was killed in Iraq, said she and others were ready to protest to stop the army approaching under-18s.
MSPs Christine Grahame, of the SNP, Colin Fox of the SSP, and Chris Ballance of the Greens – yesterday prepared a letter for every high school in Scotland. They said schools allowing the Army to recruit on site would be asked to allow anti-war campaigners to visit in the interests of balance.
An Army spokeswoman said: "We are not doing anything wrong, and we are absolutely not recruiting children."


:x PC gone wrong, this woman appears to be all over the place spouting sh+te
 
#19
If the local bobby visits a school should he be accompanied by the local street robber for "Balance"

At least we now know where she's coming from...........................................
 
#20
Tin foil on

Or of course it could be that lots of jocks vote Labour, if they join the Army they might see the world though different eyes and vote sensibly, and so Labour might lose votes....

Tin foil Off
 

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