Cadets killed or injured in terrorist attacks

#41
I am also aware of another incident when an 18 year old ACF cadet was shot and killed whilst on a mobile patrol with an infantry Battalion in Belfast- I am currently going through my records to see if I can find that one, as well as a raid for arms on a school in Belfast (pre the Troubles).
I believe he was OTC on attachment for a visit from GB and was invited to go on the patrol- not sure but Staffords rings a bell. I think he was the only member of the OTC killed during the troubles.
 
#42
Who was the mentalist on here who used to claim cadets would be facing down Soviet tanks if the cold war kicked off?
If they'd got as far as south London I seriously believe we would have been up for it back then, gung-ho and unrealistic as one is at age 14. Not sure our Lee Enfield No. 4s and Brens would have done much good, but still ...
 
#46
This bit. The lad was actually in the patrol? Surely not?
I'm still searching my records, but from memory he was with his adult instructor and about to apply for a commission when he was tken out. I think the incident happened on or near the Springfield Road in Belfast.
 
#47
I believe he was OTC on attachment for a visit from GB and was invited to go on the patrol- not sure but Staffords rings a bell. I think he was the only member of the OTC killed during the troubles.
Grateful UFG, it will make my search easier-I don't suppose you remember the year, or even decade?
 
#48
Now that is interesting...so I got in touch with my old school...they have a "historian" who is a mine of info.

I was off on my dates by a fair bit!

Felsted is about 30 miles from my old school but great rivals. It seems that we are possibly talking about the same incident. Apparently our CCF lost 35 rifles and 4 Brens. Another school was also raided, she thinks possibly Brentwood Independent, but no weapons taken, and then they/he hit Felsted. That could explain why there was such a haul in the van.

Thanks for posting that as its maybe tied up some loose ends.

It would also explain why our armoury appeared more modern than a between the wars building as it would have been built late 50's I guess.
I believe that it was as a result of these raids, that Cadet Force units were forbidden from holding automatic weapons or other items like grenades and mortar bombs.

The Kudos I received after finding a Boyes Anti-Tank Rifle in an underground armoury at a school in the city of London helped me get early promotion.
 
#49
Grateful UFG, it will make my search easier-I don't suppose you remember the year, or even decade?
There's a mention in one of Ken Wharton's books about the incident. The cadet was on a jolly (summer camp) with a resident battalion when their vehicle was ambushed. Cant remember the exact year but around '73 or '74.
 
#50
Who was the mentalist on here who used to claim cadets would be facing down Soviet tanks if the cold war kicked off?
That would be me - it was a nasty case of 'fake news' however.
 
#51
I left the ATC NI Wing around 93 / 94 and even that late it was still prohibited to wear any element of uniform or OD in public. I remember our Squadron OC chewing-out a couple of lads from another sqn for wearing their blue isue raincoats over civvies. "Do youse want to get shot?” in his usual gentle manner...

One exception was the annual Remembrance parade but even then we had to proceed to the forming-up area in civvies and then change behind a bus. Presumably that was believed to be a sanitised area as the peelers had done a couple of passes with dogs and pokey-sticks.

Odd times.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#52
There's a mention in one of Ken Wharton's books about the incident. The cadet was on a jolly (summer camp) with a resident battalion when their vehicle was ambushed. Cant remember the exact year but around '73 or '74.
Ken Wharton is on Facebook. Maybe his indexing will find the event quickly if you ask nicely.
 
#53
Grateful to all for the assistance.

I have one other, although not directly related to a Cadet, it does fall within the parameters:

On 24 October 1974, when the Provos were bombing and shooting various targets on the mainland, PIRA carried out a bombing of a cottage within the grounds of Harrow College. They had telephoned a warning to the Press Association at 2324 hours in the evening, and shortly before midnight, a device containing 5lb (2.5kgs) of commercial explosive, detonated against a wall of the cottage. There were no injuries.

The target was the Officer Commanding the College CCF contingent, a Regular Army officer on the posted strength of the College.
 
#56
From my notes for 1975, apologies for any inaccuracies.

26 January 1975

NEWTOWNABBEY, COUNTY ANTRIM

Summary: Edward Wilson, a 16-year-old Protestant civilian and Cadet Corporal with 1919 Squadron, Air Training Corps. He was killed by a 10lb IRA booby-trap bomb when it exploded as he opened an inner door of the Air Training Corps hut on the Cavehill Road. The explosion slightly injured 5 other boys on the grounds of the Cavehill Primary School. The ATC building was in a shambles, with one wall completely gone and wreckage scattered over a wide area. In a corner a body, later identified as Edward Wilson, was trapped underneath a pile of rubbish. His clothes were ripped to shreds. The bombers broke into the hut through the rear and attached the bomb to the adjutant's office. The Provisional IRA claimed responsibility for the bombing.
Apologies, just came across this response after Googling Eddie Wilson again. It looks like your summary is based on his extract in the 'Lost Lives' books (or maybe that is based on your notes?). However, it's not completely accurate. The 5 of us that were injured were all inside the hut. Three had gone straight through to the main room in the middle of the hut, one was standing behind Eddie carrying a pile of newspapers he was taking into the office. He had fragments of the papers blown into his eyes but miraculously avoided serious injury, I say miraculously as he would only have been a few feet from the device but Eddie took the full force of the blast and probably saved our lives. I was the last one in and had just turned round to close the front door, about 5 or 6 feet away when it went off. I also somehow managed to avoid serious injury although my right hand was mangled and I suffered a back injury that stopped me getting into the RAF. The 5 of us were all very lucky.
 
#57
Apologies, just came across this response after Googling Eddie Wilson again. It looks like your summary is based on his extract in the 'Lost Lives' books (or maybe that is based on your notes?). However, it's not completely accurate. The 5 of us that were injured were all inside the hut. Three had gone straight through to the main room in the middle of the hut, one was standing behind Eddie carrying a pile of newspapers he was taking into the office. He had fragments of the papers blown into his eyes but miraculously avoided serious injury, I say miraculously as he would only have been a few feet from the device but Eddie took the full force of the blast and probably saved our lives. I was the last one in and had just turned round to close the front door, about 5 or 6 feet away when it went off. I also somehow managed to avoid serious injury although my right hand was mangled and I suffered a back injury that stopped me getting into the RAF. The 5 of us were all very lucky.
Grateful for your correction and personal account Benz1.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
semper The Intelligence Cell 54
T Army Reserve 92
msr ARRSE: Site Issues 0

Similar threads

Top