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Cadets given awards

Auld-Yin

ADC
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#1
These boys did well and show the ACF in a good light. Well done boys.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/edinburgh_and_east/7296271.stm

Three Midlothian teenagers have received a prestigious award for their life-saving actions after a shotgun incident last year.
Army cadets Aaron Moore, 14, Liam Dugan, 16, and Daniel Sturrock, 15, have been awarded the St John Life Saving Medal from the Order of St John.

It is in recognition of their bravery after they gave first aid to Penicuik ice cream man James Allison.

Mr Allison, was shot while serving people in Strathesk Road in December.

The three heroes were on the way to Army cadet training when they were involved in the drama on 4 December 2007.

Self confidence

Despite the gunman, they rushed to Mr Allison, who was bleeding extensively from a shotgun wound in the abdomen.

Liam Dugan, a former Penicuik High School pupil who has been a cadet for three years, said he phoned for an ambulance when he heard cries for help.

He told BBC Scotland news website: "We heard really loud bangs at the end of the street but we didn't know what it was.


James Allison was shot in December

"Then he (Mr Allison) managed to swing the door of his ice-cream van open and call for help.

"My adrenaline was flowing and we just started doing what we have been trained to do in the cadets.

"When I later called my mum and told her there had been a shooting and I was involved in helping she got a real fright."

Daniel Sturrock, said he had never "seen anything like it".

He said: "Aaron found a towel in the van and pressed it against his wound while I reassured him

"He was saying 'I've been shot' and he was moaning and groaning and I told him he was going to be ok.

"We changed his patch and I had a lot of adrenaline, it was all a bit of a blur."

Aaron Moore said: "We did what we had to do. We are trained in first aid and hopefully I will be a medic in the army when I'm older.


Daniel Sturrock, Aaron Moore and Liam Dugan at the award ceremony

"Our families are very proud of us and we are very pleased to receive this award."

Richard Waller, chief executive of the Order of St John in Scotland, said the "immediate and effective response" helped to save Mr Allison's life.

He said: "The boys put their own lives at risk to save someone else's life because, when they intervened, the gunman was in the vicinity.

"This made them the perfect recipients of the St John Life Saving Medals and we hope that this will encourage others to nominate suitable candidates in the future."

Colonel David McFadyen, commandant of the Edinburgh and Lothians Army Cadets Battalion, said: "Everyone in the battalion is delighted that Aaron, Liam and Daniel have received this significant honour from the Order of St John.

"We are extremely proud of the way our young cadets responded in a practical and professional manner putting their training and self confidence to immediate positive effect."

The Order of St John is a charity which helps people in sickness, distress, suffering or danger. In many countries it operates the St John Ambulance service.

The teenagers received their medals, which were presented by Sir James Garden, the head of the Order of St John in Scotland, at a ceremony in Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh on Friday afternoon.

Edinburgh's Lord Provost, George Grubb, the Provost of Midlothian, Adam Montgomery, and the Lord Lieutenant of Midlothian, Patrick Prenter, also attended the ceremony.
 
#2
Well done to the lads.

The ice cream man doesn't seem to have a favourable background though.


Ice cream man tells of nightmares after shotgun attack in van

An ice-cream man who was gunned down as he served children from his van has complained of still being haunted by the attack.

Jim Allison says he is woken by nightmares in which he hears gun shots going off and has to take medication for post-traumatic stress.

No-one has been charged in connection with the shooting in Penicuik, in which he was blasted twice in the stomach at close range. Mr Allison, 58, a father-of-two, was sentenced to 12 years for rape after being convicted in 1970.

He was forced to sell his popular business three months after being shot, in December 2006, because he felt unable to leave his home. Police investigating the shotgun attack have submitted a report to the procurator fiscal naming the person they believe was behind it. But Mr Allison said the police have not told him who they think was responsible.

He said: "I have nightmares. I hear banging noises during the night and I wake up. How could anyone work in a van which they had been shot in? But I've had loads of support from family and friends and people in Penicuik."

The ice cream man spent weeks recovering in hospital where he underwent two operations, including the removal of part of his bladder.

He told friends that only his heavy build prevented the wounds proving fatal, and doctors told him he was "really lucky" to be alive.
http://edinburghnews.scotsman.com/latestnews/Ice-cream-man-tells-of.3771502.jp

...and assistance from three Cadets.

I sometimes wonder why people bother.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#3
Scots Ice Cream deliveries, they could have taught the Keenie Meanies a few things on under cover work!!!!
 
#4
Well done boys, good show.
 
#5
I'm not in the cadets ,never have been. But this is an exceptional act of courage for people so young to have done. Well done you.

How many ice creams did you nick afterwards?
 
#6
Excellent !!!!!
 
#7
Don't get me wrong - the cadets undoubtedly did extremely well and helped to save this man's life. However.... the first thing cadets (or anyone) are taught in first aid is Check for Danger to yourself (first priority) and the casualty (second priority) - Gunman still in the vicinity - they were lucky they did not become casualties themselves. Don't go rushing into situations that could go horribly wrong - it's no good to be a hero if you're dead.
 
#11
littlenickoutthere said:
just another quick point, in the article the cadets are in No.2's, since when do they get those?
Probably either they (or their Det Commander) have bought them.

The only cadets to be issued No.2 Dress through the system are Lord Lieutenant's Cadets due to the primarily ceremonial and 'public eye' nature of that role.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#13
The local cadets for the war memorial party on remembrance are issued theirs, not always the same kids!
 
#14
ugly said:
The local cadets for the war memorial party on remembrance are issued theirs, not always the same kids!
Probably issued by their Det though. Some Dets do obtain stocks for such occasions (I have done this), but it doesn't come through the system.
 
#16
Don't get me wrong - the cadets undoubtedly did extremely well and helped to save this man's life. However.... the first thing cadets (or anyone) are taught in first aid is Check for Danger to yourself (first priority) and the casualty (second priority) - Gunman still in the vicinity - they were lucky they did not become casualties themselves. Don't go rushing into situations that could go horribly wrong - it's no good to be a hero if you're dead.
And you'll never be a hero if you aren't prepared to take a risk. They were there, they made the call, they got it right. Good fella's.

Yesterday evening my wife was attacked in her car by a bunch of about 15 teenage yobs. Two elderly ladies who were passing intervened and caused the teenagers to run off (having stolen my wifes car keys). Perhaps they should have just turned a blind eye rather than risking their safety, but I am very glad they didn't.
 
#17
Some Dets do obtain stocks for such occasions (I have done this), but it doesn't come through the system.
We keep a stock of No1's and No2's, like you not through the system officially but provided over many years by the affiliated regiment.
 
#18
combat_gnome said:
Don't get me wrong - the cadets undoubtedly did extremely well and helped to save this man's life. However.... the first thing cadets (or anyone) are taught in first aid is Check for Danger to yourself (first priority) and the casualty (second priority) - Gunman still in the vicinity - they were lucky they did not become casualties themselves. Don't go rushing into situations that could go horribly wrong - it's no good to be a hero if you're dead.
Interesting point. I assume, by that logic, that we should remove the 29 VC's and 2 bars won by members of the RAMC as they should have been aware of the danger as they were taught in thier first aid lesosns.

These guys acted outstandingly in possibly dangerous conditions. They save some blokes life. You really can't accuse them of bad drills.

P.S. I really hope that, should I get seriously injured, one of these three lads is around to help me and not someone like yourself who is going to request a H&S review before attmepting CPR.
 
#19
jew_unit said:
Interesting point. I assume, by that logic, that we should remove the 29 VC's and 2 bars won by members of the RAMC as they should have been aware of the danger as they were taught in thier first aid lesosns.

These guys acted outstandingly in possibly dangerous conditions. They save some blokes life. You really can't accuse them of bad drills.

P.S. I really hope that, should I get seriously injured, one of these three lads is around to help me and not someone like yourself who is going to request a H&S review before attmepting CPR.

What he said.
 
#20
I know the cadets quite well - they are in one of the detachments in my Bn and I have worked with them on courses, cadres etc.

They are very level headed and modest people and have taken it all in their stride including the inevitable jokes that the ice cream man must have owed them money, been their dealer etc etc

On the day the shooting occurred they were in uniform going into their detachment. The gunman actually ran past them and disappeared.

There was some speculation that the gunman saw the uniforms (they are reasonably smart cadets), thought they might have been from the nearby barracks and made off.

A shotgun wound to the abdomen fired from close range is a nasty sight and the cadets did extremely well in dealing with the incident - the youngest cadet (in age, rank and time in the cadets) Aaron Moore took the initial lead in treatment but the others quickly followed and did their bit.

The police put the major incident plan into place, forming a cordon until the area was secure - whilst this was a correct and prudent response, it meant the cadets had to deal with the incident for longer before trained ambulance personnel arrived.

The No2 dress came through the usual Bn system - for something like this our parent unit will always help in every way possible.

I attach a pic of the day of the presentation.
 

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