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Cadet Instructors

#1
Does anyone find that SOME (well most) cadet instructors are just biffas that think they were in the sas and who just join the ACF just to moan at youths.....I do: every wednesday....So why don't i just quit!!!!!! its gay, but its like an addiction!
 
#2
Fffuuuucccckkkkss sake! Let's not start another "All cadet instructors are walts". You get some chopers in every organisation, some regs are muppets, some TA are fools too. And yeah, there are a few uber walts waddling they way around my cadet battalion, but we've done this discussion to death! How come nobody ever does a topic asking about "Who was the most influential person to you in cadets"


Jjjjjeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
 
#3
OKy Koky, ill tell you what, lets put a constuctive spin on this, has anybody fornd that being in cadets was actually a benifit to basic training, alot of people i know have said that the instructing staff don't like you for it. Or do they??
 
#4
Woody32 said:
OKy Koky, ill tell you what, lets put a constuctive spin on this, has anybody fornd that being in cadets was actually a benifit to basic training, alot of people i know have said that the instructing staff don't like you for it. Or do they??
It can help, but there will be a time in training when suddenly being an ex cadet will not help 8O , and never never never say to your section commander in training "We did it this way in the cadets" or it will be early doors, lights out if you know what i mean :twisted: .

On a serious note being a cadet means you are already in green and that will give you heads up for a while.......
 
#5
Woody32 said:
OKy Koky, ill tell you what, lets put a constuctive spin on this, has anybody fornd that being in cadets was actually a benifit to basic training, alot of people i know have said that the instructing staff don't like you for it. Or do they??
Every cadet who joins will find it a benefit. they have an idea about what's happening, why and maybe why.

Only a problem if you say 'I did it this way in the cadets' that's when your problem starts...


Where you a cadet?
Did you join up?
What are you doing now?
Looking at your picture I hope you recover ;-)
 

slab

Old-Salt
#6
I agree with the Tsar. The cadet instructor with both feet in fantasy land bit is starting to wear a bit thin now, or is it they all subscribe to arrse, as well as their detractors.

I have spent a year now as an ACF instructor (on top of 12 years regular army a while back) and so far have not come across any instructors - even ex-cadets - in my county (east midlands area) who would qualify for an out and out walt award. Yes, some of them spend more than they should on exotic webbing and smocks, but nobody pretends they're in the Hereford Gun Club. All adults know ACF is a youth organisation - just better structured and equipped than most.

Woody - I'm sorry you feel the way you do - perhaps you were abused as a cadet yourself - but don't go slagging off the whole organisation which by and large does a reasonable job for most kids that walk through the barrack gates.
 
#7
Woody for future reference:

Engage brain then open mouth (in this case use keyboard)

If you have that much of an issue with the ACF or its instructors then fcuk off the organisation does a very good job often with bad kit and some difficult children it does not need people slagging it off for no apparent reason. It appears that you have some deep seated issues that you need to address or maybe you are just a cnut ??
 
#8
Woody if you are moaning at the kids every weds I suggest that you pack it in as that is not what they need. I agree with the above replies this has been done to death. Perhaps you could expand and tell us what reasons you have for your crass remarks.
 
#9
to be fair, after i was MD'd, I went to the local ACF to offer my services. I got this t*at of an ACF LT saying that i would have to learn how to do all the things before i taught them and would start as a sgt before seeing if was fit for promotion in about 20 years or so.

I kindly explained that i spent a lot of my youth in the ACF then 6 years in the army including the factory, thus surly if the Army thought i was good enough to be an officer, then maybe they could too! He then started spouting attributes of an officer to me and what i could aspire to. I resisted the temptation to get hi head and ram it through the filing cabinet and just asked him if he was representative of the rest of the staff int he detachment and his reply of (whispered) " no, im one of the better trained ones, just got my pips etc". He then encouraged me to go and think if i could put the committment in to learn about the military. i could have sworn he had my cv in front of him and i told him my history, on a number of occasions!

I shouldnt have got so wound up, but.....
OS
 
#10
Shame you met that tw*t oneshot. I know rules differ for each person going in, I think you still have to do the qualifying courses, but I know that with a commission you'd just have to convert your commission to a TA commission instead.

Grrr, chopper Officers make me mad in the ACF!
 
#11
Two of my chaps recently tried to join the TA, but were very unimpressed to say the least,hopefully this was just a one off, and is not the standard throughout the TA, but the points raised were:
1, a 20 minute lesson on NSP`s, but not explaining what NSP`s stood for.
2, bad turnout from JNR NCO`s no rank slides worn, buttons undone.
3, drill being taught incorrectly.
My chaps said the standard required for TP`s from our CTT, when they done there ITC, was higher than was shown to them by the TA Jnr NCO`s whom were instructing them. They did however say the Snr NCO`s were very good. Perhaps the Jnr`s had not been taugth MOI yet. They are still with me at my Det, and have used this as a lesson learnt and produce very good lessons from it.
 
#12
Yes, I did know that he was just a chopper but other things happened around the same time and his attitude encouraged me to put that at the bottom of the pile. Have moved location now (this was about 4 years ago) so thinking about trying again.

I guess that im scared of becoming that chopper!!!!!! I might think i'm a real soldier again or something and start telling stories of being in "nam" and the like!!
 
#13
Back to the topic about does being in the ACF help in the regs


I found it useful for all the basic stuff like drill and badges of rank, just needed to sharpen up thats all, also on camps in the ACF we did morning inspections and bedblocks, obviously not to the degree of Basic Reg training, but it was less of a culture shock when I got to depot.

During one drill session I was marked out as one to watch as my drill was spot on and was asked if I was ever in the cadets, I replied

"Yes Sarnt"

To which he responded

"I f**king hate cadets", but gave me a wink when he snapped past
 
#14
We have an LE Captain who isleaving the Army entering our company in the ACF, so I'll ask him how its working for him and get back to you Oneshot. Best thign to do is approach the ares Cadet Executive Officer, you can find their number on the army cadet web page (www.armycadets.com). Things can get messed up higher up the food chain....I was asked to take an ACF commission after being an instructor for three eyars, as I had passed my RCB a few years previously. However, because someone somewhere took two years to decide whether or not an RCB pass counts for an ACF commisson, instead of a TCB pass which you need, it took two years to get commsisoned! Pointless? Yes, though these mistakes were made by snr reg colonels.

Clanker: When I went to Uni I joined the UOTC in Birmingham. I left within a month after realising that the Officers and JUOs I was with were complete and utter re-tards, and I had to bale a 2/LT out of a map and compass lesson.
 
#15
Gives you a basic idea .how to wear a uniform ,drill ,how to handle weapons . etc .Thats about it cadets is fun and useful but
its a youth orgnisation at the end of the day .
 
#16
woody said:
Gives you a basic idea .how to wear a uniform ,drill ,how to handle weapons . etc .Thats about it cadets is fun and useful but
its a youth orgnisation at the end of the day .
Obvious state bleeding
 
#18
oh_bug.ger said:
If you have that much of an issue with the ACF or its instructors then fcuk off the organisation does a very good job often with bad kit and some difficult children it does not need people slagging it off for no apparent reason.
Tell me about it, I have taken over a Unit,the numbers have already dropped to more than half the original size, im down to 8 turning up, the 2 senior NCOs got poached by another unit ! and to that i have 3 with learning difficulties in addition to one having behavioral problems and no NCOs, so as you can see i have my hands full ! i couldn't do the paperwork and teach at the same time with minimal equipment, this is in a schoool in middle of a fairly grotty area, not a TA centre, I ammaking the best of a bad circumstances , I would like to see any of you try and do what i do !

a Saint i am not but i am blooody coming close to it !
 
#19
Oneshot, I can only apologize for the t wat Orifice that you spoke to when applying to become an adult instructor. As far as I can make out, the reason that there is hostility towards ex squaddies, in particular ex Rupert's joining the ACF, is down to the fact that the other 'established' instructors are scared that you might (definitely) know more than them and ultimately knock them from the self built pedestal that they view themselves on. They are scared that you might come along and point out their shortfalls, and highlight their lack of knowledge. Additionally, many of the Instructors have done nothing other than a Four Star, and perhaps watched "Dog Soldiers" or "Who Dares Wins" to complete their knowledge of all things Military.

As for the entering as a Sgt thing, that is normally true. The worst case scenario, is that you enter as a PI (potential Instructor) or an Under Officer. These is a limbo position that you end up in during the transitional stage between FNG and Instructor whilst Police/Security checks are carried out etc.

In some cases, it is necessary for individuals to shadow established Instructors (assuming that you are shadowing the decent ones), as it is very different in the ACF compared to the Army. The tactics are at least 20 years out of date, the equipment is older (apart from that purchased by the Cadets themselves!!!), and you will be constantly be banging your head against bureaucracy. As well as having the pleasure of teaching the Cadets all the "fun" things that you did as a serving soldier, you spend a great deal of your time dealing with petty squabbling, and sometimes serious welfare issues (there is a Padre for such things, but he doesn't live in the Camp Chapel, and you cant just relieve yourself of the problem by sending said welfare case to see him, as maybe you might in the forces).

The most frustrating thing that I come across is the 'Attitude' of the Cadets/Young adults. The "Whatever!"/"I'm bored" culture is now at the forefront of everything that you do. Nuff said, a good Instructor will control such attitudes, but there is always a rotten apple in every barrel, and the rot spreads very quickly.

Next, is the internal politics of the organization itself. Whatever Mess or background that you have come from, you will struggle to get to the bottom of the pathetic and ridiculous backstabbing dinosaur attitudes of some individuals, and the "I'll Fcuk it up because I can" mentality. The "Stores is for Storing" ethos doesn't end with the Stores personnel.

All said and done, I have been a Cadet Instructor since 88 (Army before that, and Cadet before that), and there must be something in it that keeps me there. I would recommend it to anyone with a thick skin, a sense of fun and willingness to try and make a difference to the lives of some of the (potential) Chav Scum of tomorrow. Don't give up, its worth it in the end, Honest!!!!!!




Inky
 
#20
As for the entering as a Sgt thing, that is normally true. The worst case scenario, is that you enter as a PI (potential Instructor) or an Under Officer. These is a limbo position that you end up in during the transitional stage between FNG and Instructor whilst Police/Security checks are carried out etc.

My experience is slightly different to Inkerman's. The main thing is an adult, even an recently discharged (or indeed serving) soldier can't take up a position as an AI until their CRB comes through. Until that time they are a Civilian Assistant (CA). Then they become a Potential Instructor until they attend an instructors course run by the local cadet training team (that's the point at which I am at) after which comes promotion to SI.

There are UOs in the county, however new commissioning applicants will have to go through the new RCB-type process.

Prior military experience is valued - several senior positions within my sub-unit are held by ex regular forces, however IMOH the main aspect these individuals bring to the unit is good man and resource management skills. Those adults who have come up the cadet route are particularly good at knowing what makes the kids tick. There do not appear to be any walts or individuals with chips on shoulders. Or perhaps I haven't been in long enough.

Previous military qualifications do apply generally. However, there is a fairly rapid "sell by" date for these, particularly range qualifications. For more details, see the relevant publicaton!
 

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