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CAA bans Boeing 737 max 8

I think that (FAA in particular) they've been rather hoist by their own petards and shown to be weak and complicit with the big boys. Now they need to not only be squeaky clean but to be shown to be squeaky clean.
This

And then some


Rather like guards who are the model of efficiency after the banks been robbed the FAA is going to jump on so much as a cockroach fart in the wrong place for a short while.

The other Agencies (EASA) - They nodded it through as the FAA had all part of reciptocal arrangements and a big dose of Trust. Thats taken a hit but should recover a soon as its clear the FAA has learned absorbed and acted on the lesson.
 
This

And then some


Rather like guards who are the model of efficiency after the banks been robbed the FAA is going to jump on so much as a cockroach fart in the wrong place for a short while.

The other Agencies (EASA) - They nodded it through as the FAA had all part of reciptocal arrangements and a big dose of Trust. Thats taken a hit but should recover a soon as its clear the FAA has learned absorbed and acted on the lesson.
...for now....
 
Ryanair expects to be flying the MAX commercially in February,


I shall not be flying wit them.
 
Caption reads:

'It's only 8:20 AM and one of many 737 MAXes at Lackland Air Force Base is being prepared for an imminent return to service by a team of Boeing employees. This particular MAX 9 is designated to be N17529 when it's delivered to UAL.'

 
Hmmm. Every other version of 737 except this please.
 
And there it is, clearance to fly again issued:

 
And there it is, clearance to fly again issued:

Not quite:
The FAA action is only the first step in allowing 59 airlines which own the 387 grounded planes to fly them as part of their schedule. The FAA said in a statement before any of the planes can be flown with passengers again, the necessary changes to the 737 Max identified in the approval process must be installed, the FAA must inspect the individual planes. The pilots must also complete additional training
 
Not quite:
The FAA action is only the first step in allowing 59 airlines which own the 387 grounded planes to fly them as part of their schedule. The FAA said in a statement before any of the planes can be flown with passengers again, the necessary changes to the 737 Max identified in the approval process must be installed, the FAA must inspect the individual planes. The pilots must also complete additional training
I expect the pressure from Boeing will mean that operations won't be long coming. The pilots aren't exactly busy, neither are the engineers, so training will proceed apace.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Reported today that the FAA has given permission for flights to restart in the US.


... Existing aircraft will need to be modified before going back into service, with changes to their design.
... The boss of the FAA, said he was "100% confident" in the safety of the plane.


I will wait a while and see before riding a 737 Max 8.

The real worry is the Boeing corporate culture that allowed the plane to fly with this fault in the first place. I've got experience of working with big organisations and I know how difficult it is to turn the cultural supertanker.
 
I'll be in no rush to get on one of them.
I think it'll be a while before they're flying this side of the pond since EASA and other worldwide regulators are doing their own due diligence, FAA having eroded confidence.
 
I think it'll be a while before they're flying this side of the pond since EASA and other worldwide regulators are doing their own due diligence, FAA having eroded confidence.
I wonder how long before Oleary starts telling the authorities** that he should be allowed to fly his because the FAA say he can.


**EASA
 
Reported today that the FAA has given permission for flights to restart in the US.


... Existing aircraft will need to be modified before going back into service, with changes to their design.
... The boss of the FAA, said he was "100% confident" in the safety of the plane.


I will wait a while and see before riding a 737 Max 8.

The real worry is the Boeing corporate culture that allowed the plane to fly with this fault in the first place. I've got experience of working with big organisations and I know how difficult it is to turn the cultural supertanker.
Cracking headline from the Beeb. The implication from that being they have to crash first before being allowed into the air again.

Oh, and cheers ;)

 

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