CAA bans Boeing 737 max 8

rampant

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I wonder which year the 737 MAX will ever resume commercial flying?.

This last week Icelandair have flown their stored MAX'es down to Toulouse for further storage.
At the rate problems are cropping up, I'm weighing up the idea of putting money down on never
 
you could be right - I could be simply prejudiced and seeing cats where there are none - but in my experience If its got pointy ears sleek fur a long tail, impressive whiskers and hunts mice - im probably not looking at an otter
I'd agree with that, close call though ...



I do like the squaddie-inspired registration.
 
Further to the crack problems in the Boeing 737 NG, airlines have found cracks in 38 out of 810 planes inspected so far, with these cracks requiring "repair and replacement".
Boeing Co said Thursday that airlines had inspected 810 of the company's 737 NG jets around the world, and found 38 structural cracks requiring repair and replacement.

The planes will be grounded until the repairs are made, Boeing and airline officials said. Nearly five per cent of inspections have found cracks in a "pickle fork" — a part that attaches the plane's fuselage, or body, to the wing structure and manages forces.
These 810 planes represent less than half of the more than 1,900 which must be inspected for cracks, although the ones which have been inspected first are the ones most likely to currently have cracks.
. In total, 1,911 U.S. 737 NGs are covered by the FAA directive.
The planes will be grounded until the repairs are made. Repairing the cracks may take up to 60 days.
Planes with cracks "may need to be taken out of the fleet for up to 60 days for maintenance," Syth said.
This is a problem for airlines already struggling with the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max, as it will take another 4 percent of capacity out of service between now and mid-December.
Raymond James analyst Savanthi Syth wrote in a research note Thursday that the findings from the 737 NG inspections could "potentially take up to four per cent of capacity off-line" between mid-October and mid-December."
 
Air Canada, a major operator of the Boeing 737 Max, have pushed back the return to service of this plane until at least the 14th of February next year.
Air Canada said on Wednesday it had removed Boeing Co's 737 Max planes from flight schedules until Feb. 14, citing uncertainty around the aircraft's return to service.
Other airlines operating the plane have also announced that they do not see the plane returning to service until some time next year at the earliest.
 
Cracks in aircraft are nothing new and especially when one considers that some of the older 737 NG aircraft are getting on in terms of operating hours. When QANTAS had an engine explode on a virtually brand new A380 out of Singapore they found cracks in the wing structure when fixing the damage. This led to a world-wide fleet inspection and repair order from Airbus.

As to the B737 Max, I note that the flight crews of both the crashed aircraft performed atrociously. With Lion Air that doesn't surprise me, however, with Ethiopian Airlines the crew initially took the correct action but then reversed their decision. I also note that in the US and elsewhere, where the aircraft has wracked up thousands of hours of operation before the grounding that there were no crashes. As many readers on this forum will attest, training will out when the pressure comes on.

p.s. That link to the NY Times article a page or so ago nicely explains the whole problem well.
 
Cracks in aircraft are nothing new and especially when one considers that some of the older 737 NG aircraft are getting on in terms of operating hours. When QANTAS had an engine explode on a virtually brand new A380 out of Singapore they found cracks in the wing structure when fixing the damage. This led to a world-wide fleet inspection and repair order from Airbus.
(...)
As noted above, many of the Boeing 737 NG operators are also (would be) Boeing 737 Max operators, and already are cancelling fights and routes due to shortages of flyable planes. Losing availability of any of their NG planes on top of their existing shortages is going to add to their headaches and financial losses.
 
And it appears that some of the FAA inspectors that were involved in the Boeing 737 Max 8 approval were not qualified for their jobs and that the FAA may have mislead the US congress as to this and other related issues.

16 out of 22 inspectors had not completed their training, and 11 of the 16 did not have the flight instructor which is a requirement for the job.
52CBE24A-6AAD-4ED3-B5EB-11774DAF68A2.jpeg

Well I am amazed...
 

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