CAA bans Boeing 737 max 8

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
They are cutting flights from all over the UK and Ireland, I don't think it's purely down to the Boeings, they've also cut out hubs in the Canaries and parts of Spain too.
Yep.
It's really all due to Brexit....

1coat.gif
 
Yep.
It's really all due to Brexit....

View attachment 416637
I hope one thing which comes out of Brexit though is some sort of reduction in the APD on long haul flights...it's ridiculous now. It's cheaper to fly to a place like Rio by taking a cheap flight to one of the European hubs and flying in Business from there than flying direct from London in Economy.
 
They are cutting flights from all over the UK and Ireland, I don't think it's purely down to the Boeings, they've also cut out hubs in the Canaries and parts of Spain too.
Hmm several airlines cut back around this time citing ecomomy etc - I smell a Convenient excuse - Brexit will be the next reason ( Probably wanted to use it this time but as its still not happened...)
 
Hmm several airlines cut back around this time citing ecomomy etc - I smell a Convenient excuse - Brexit will be the next reason ( Probably wanted to use it this time but as its still not happened...)
Canadian airlines have had to reduce frequency, drop flights, and stop serving some destinations because of the overall shortage of seats caused by the Boeing 737 Max problems.
 
Hmm several airlines cut back around this time citing ecomomy etc - I smell a Convenient excuse - Brexit will be the next reason ( Probably wanted to use it this time but as its still not happened...)
Are you serious? A lot of airlines are trying to consolidate by buying a single type for efficiency and this grounding does put a dent in their operations.
 
Are you serious? A lot of airlines are trying to consolidate by buying a single type for efficiency and this grounding does put a dent in their operations.
True

But up against that you've got O'Leary

Ryan scare have a large fleet of 737s already - some will be life ex - some may be leased and leases are ended - but all the crews will still be current - so the bulk of operations could continue on the existing type.

Shall we say that having been subject to Ryan air practices at a professional level - im somewhat cynical as to the scale of the 73 max problems impact upon them - when considered that several other operators have recently chopped similar unprofitable routes.

you could be right - I could be simply prejudiced and seeing cats where there are none - but in my experience If its got pointy ears sleek fur a long tail, impressive whiskers and hunts mice - im probably not looking at an otter
 
Boeing has started to settle lawsuits for the Lion Air crash related to their MCAS system. Settlements are starting at $1.2 million apiece, and going up from there depending upon how many dependents are involved.
Boeing Co. has settled the first claims stemming from the crash of a Lion Air 737 Max in Indonesia, a U.S. plaintiffs' lawyer said, and three other sources said that families of those killed will receive at least $1.2 million US apiece.
 
And it appears that some of the FAA inspectors that were involved in the Boeing 737 Max 8 approval were not qualified for their jobs and that the FAA may have mislead the US congress as to this and other related issues.
Federal investigators say some safety inspectors who helped set pilot-training standards for the Boeing 737 Max were unqualified and the Federal Aviation Administration seemed to mislead Congress about their competency.
16 out of 22 inspectors had not completed their training, and 11 of the 16 did not have the flight instructor which is a requirement for the job.
The FAA determined that 16 of 22 inspectors in Seattle and Long Beach, California, had not finished their formal training, and of the 16, 11 did not hold a flight-instructor license, a requirement for the job. But, the FAA told a Senate committee this spring, they worked on other planes and none of the unqualified inspectors helped write training standards for the Max.

The special counsel said that was not true, based on information from the whistleblower and other evidence. Special Counsel Henry Kerner said it is likely that some Max inspectors were neither qualified to certify other pilots to fly nor to recommend how pilots should be trained for procedures and manoeuvres on the plane.
 
As if Boeing didn't have enough problems with their 737 Max, the older 737 NG is having problems with cracks.
More bad news for Boeing's 737 line of aircraft: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said late Friday it will require operators of some 737 NG jetliners to conduct inspections for structural cracks and make repairs as needed following the discovery of cracks on a small number of planes.

The FAA said Boeing notified it of the issue "after it discovered the cracks while conducting modifications on a heavily used aircraft." Subsequent inspections "uncovered similar cracks in a small number of additional planes." Boeing said on Friday it has been in contact with 737 NG operators about a cracking issue, but added that "no in-service issues have been reported."

Neither the FAA nor Boeing immediately said how many planes were impacted by the required inspections.
It's hard to say how serious this is at present, as we don't know yet how many planes this affects. Even it if isn't a lot though, it may cause headaches for airlines as they are relying heavily on these planes to fill in the gap for their grounded 737 Max planes.

The problem apparently is in a part which attaches the wings to the fuselage. I gather this is a part of the plane that is generally consider to be somewhat important.
KOMO News reported on Friday the issue involved cracked "pickle forks" in some 737 NG jets. The pickle fork attaches the plane's fuselage, or body, to the wing structure and manages forces. A failure of the part in flight could pose a serious risk. KOMO said workers found a severely cracked pickle fork on a Boeing 737NG earlier this month.
 
The problem apparently is in a part which attaches the wings to the fuselage. I gather this is a part of the plane that is generally consider to be somewhat important.
Yep. Like the nut that kept the rotorhead secured onto the Sioux. Known by the techs as the “Jesus nut”
 
More problems with the Boeing 737 NG (the predecessor to the Max) as the US FAA has ordered airlines to inspect 165 Boeing 737 NG planes for structural cracks within 7 days.
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday that aircraft operators must inspect 165 Boeing 737 NG airliners for structural cracks within seven days after the issue was found on a small number of planes.
Apparently these 165 are the most urgent cases, with nearly 2,000 in the US to be inspected eventually.
The order covers a total of 1,911 U.S. registered planes. The inspections can be done visually and should require about an hour per airplane, the FAA said.
I would assume that other countries will follow with similar requirements.
 
Problems with the Boeing 737 NG wing cracks continue to spread, as airline in Canada say they will be inspecting for cracks as well.
WestJet Airlines, Sunwing Vacations Inc. and Transat A.T. said Thursday they were examining their fleets of Boeing 737 Next Generation aircraft for cracks after a U.S. regulator ordered the inspections.
The problem doesn't appear to be critical at this stage, but it is adding more headaches to airlines who many of are already struggling with the Boeing 737 Max grounding.

No doubt airlines in other countries will be doing the same.
 
I wonder which year the 737 MAX will ever resume commercial flying?.

This last week Icelandair have flown their stored MAX'es down to Toulouse for further storage.
 

Latest Threads

Top