CAA bans Boeing 737 max 8

That's interesting because Southwest are fecked if that's public opinion, because they've decided to go all in on the 737 fleet despite the well documented problems and aversions


Just checked, it seems they changed their minds and looking at Airbus now

737 Max grounding tests Southwest's relationship with Boeing

Southwest Airlines Considers An Airbus A220 Order Amid Boeing 737 MAX Fiasco

And that Airbus A220 was previously the Bombardier C Series which Boeing tried to get a 300% tariff put on.

Som nam na as they say in Thailand...
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If it’s Boeing, i’m not going....
To the tune of "I don't like Mondays"

"Tell me why
I don't like Boeing
Tell me why
I don't like Boeing
'cos when I fly
The plane goes down"
 
Two stories from the CBC.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/the-national-737-max-boeing-1.5107529?cmp=rss
www.cbc.ca/news/business/boeing-earnings-1.5108698?cmp=rss

In the first one, aviation analysts say that passengers are afraid to fly in the Boeing 737 Max and want to avoid it.


The majority of Americans want to avoid flying on the plane, even if it has been declared safe again.


Boeing's reputation took a further hit when it was revealed that the Boeing 787 was subject to poor assembly quality.


To deal with this problem, Boeing will have to conduct an extensive PR campaign to try to regain the public's confidence.


The 737 Max was Boeing's biggest selling plane, However, orders have completely dried up.


Boeing will have to cut prices to get airline customers back.


The other problem in this is that the reputation of the US FAA has also taken a hit. The FAA delegated nearly all of the safety approval work for the 737 Max to Boeing.


This was done for commercial reasons, to allow Boeing to get the plane to market sooner. The FAA manager in charge of aviation safety was formerly a lobbyist for Boeing who pushed for this to happen.


He was quite explicit that the reason for this was to help Boeing compete against "foreign manufacturers" (presumably Airbus).


He is now the one who will sign off on the Boeing 737 Max being safe again.


The second story is mainly about Boeing investment news. Sales and profits are down, but the stock has not taken a big hit because investors think this is a one-off affair and airlines don't have many alternatives for big planes.
This stinks. That bastard has indirectly killed a few hundred people. I hope he never gets a peaceful nights sleep again.

Absolutely disgusted with the airframer and the FAA.
 
Two stories from the CBC.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/the-national-737-max-boeing-1.5107529?cmp=rss
www.cbc.ca/news/business/boeing-earnings-1.5108698?cmp=rss

In the first one, aviation analysts say that passengers are afraid to fly in the Boeing 737 Max and want to avoid it.
From first:
"Passengers are afraid of this airplane," aviation industry analyst Henry Harteveldt says.

"I haven't seen anything like this in decades, in terms of consumer fear and desire to avoid flying on the 737 Max."
Is the 737 Max Boeing's de Havilland Comet?
 
From first:


Is the 737 Max Boeing's de Havilland Comet?
We haven't seen anything which indicates that the problems with the Boeing 737 Max aren't fixable from a technical perspective. The big question will be to what degree the public will trust that they've actually done it right this time.
 
Air Canada appear to be basing their planning on the assumption that the Boeing 737 Max will remain grounded at least until the end of July.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/air-canada-boeing-737-max-1.5112015?cmp=rss
Air Canada has adjusted its route schedule and cancelled flights through to the end of July as a result of the grounding of its fleet of two dozen Boeing 737 Max jets.
This is causing big problems for Air Canada, who operate two dozen of the planes and were supposed to get another dozen this summer.
That was a major headache for Air Canada, which had 24 of the jets in its fleet and was expecting another dozen this summer. Roughly 75 of the airline's 1,600 flights a day were supposed to be on Max jets, so the impact has reverberated widely.
 
Surely there's a button for that as well. Can't expect the little dears to think as well now, can you?
If you haven't been trained in (or informed about) something, you really can't think and evaluate a specific feature while the ground is fast approaching, unless by a miracle. Most people wouldn't be able to. That's why we have training and certification programs.
 
If you haven't been informed about something, you really can't think and evaluate a specific feature while the ground is fast approaching
Yep. Boeing & FAA deciding "MCAS? don't tell the pilots, it's too complicated for them" - arrogant cnuts.

iirc Pilots had ~40 seconds to figure out why plane not obeying their commands, but fighting back by over-ruling.

Reminds me of MPs, MSM, "Establishment", Remoaners etc regarding Brexit & Referendum.

Strange they don't saying the same about 2014 "PR Vote" Ref and 2016 Scot Indy Ref
 
Yep. Boeing & FAA deciding "MCAS? don't tell the pilots, it's too complicated for them" - arrogant cnuts.

iirc Pilots had ~40 seconds to figure out why plane not obeying their commands, but fighting back by over-ruling.

Reminds me of MPs, MSM, "Establishment", Remoaners etc regarding Brexit & Referendum.

Strange they don't saying the same about 2014 "PR Vote" Ref and 2016 Scot Indy Ref

The 732 Brexit threads are over there...
 
Yep. Boeing & FAA deciding "MCAS? don't tell the pilots, it's too complicated for them" - arrogant cnuts.

iirc Pilots had ~40 seconds to figure out why plane not obeying their commands, but fighting back by over-ruling.

Reminds me of MPs, MSM, "Establishment", Remoaners etc regarding Brexit & Referendum.

Strange they don't saying the same about 2014 "PR Vote" Ref and 2016 Scot Indy Ref
Did you have an Aneurysm?
 
US pilots are demanding better training on the Boeing 737 Max than what Boeing is proposing before putting it back into service.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/boeing-pilots-demand-training-american-airlines-737-max-1.5114538?cmp=rss
American Airlines pilots have warned that Boeing Co.'s draft training proposals for the troubled 737 MAX do not go far enough to address their concerns, according to written comments submitted to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and seen by Reuters.
An FAA proposal is recommending only additional computer based training, but no simulator time.
A draft report by an FAA-appointed board of pilots, engineers and other experts concluded that pilots only need additional computer-based training to understand MCAS, rather than simulator time.
The Boeing proposal and the FAA proposal are two different documents, but from the context appear to be similar.

Training on the Boeing 737 Max apparently consists of an hour long course on an iPad. An American pilots union is asking for the addition of videos showing how the MCAS work, and demonstrations of of other associated problems.
APA is arguing that mere computer explanation "will not provide a level of confidence for pilots to feel not only comfortable flying the aircraft but also relaying that confidence to the travelling public."
It said the MAX computer training, which originally involved a one-hour iPad course, should include videos of simulator sessions showing how MCAS works along with demonstrations of other cockpit emergencies such as runaway stabilizer, a loss of control that occurred on both doomed flights.
They also want regular re-training on simulators that include dealing with problems like what occurred with the MCAS.
APA also called for recurring training on simulators that includes scenarios like those experienced by the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines pilots, in addition to computer training.
"When pilots visually experience the failure modes and then apply them, the lesson is cemented in their minds," APA wrote.
Canada, Europe, and South Korea are all considering requiring simulator training.
Canada, Europe and South Korea are all weighing the need for simulator training, going above the recommendations in the draft FAA report, sources have said.
However, requiring simulator training could cause delays in returning the Boeing 737 Max return to service and it will cost airlines money.
Required simulator training could delay the MAX's return to service because it takes time to schedule hundreds or thousands of pilots on simulators. Hourly rates for simulators range between $500-$1,000 US, excluding travel expenses.
The head of American Airlines has said that as soon as the FAA approves the Boeing 737 Max to fly again, his airline will start flying it even if other countries don't.
American Airlines Chief Executive Doug Parker said on Friday that even if other countries delay the ungrounding of the MAX, once the FAA approves it, American will start flying its 24 aircraft.
 
Families of Canadians killed in the Ethiopian Airlines crash have filed lawsuits against Boeing in the US. www.cbc.ca/news/business/boeing-ceo-shareholders-737-max-crashes-1.5115102?cmp=rss
The families of Canadians killed in the Ethiopian Airlines crash last month have launched a lawsuit against plane-maker Boeing.
Rather significantly, they have also filed suit against the US FAA, claiming they allowed the plane to be rushed to market.
The families have also filed a claim against the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, alleging the regulator enabled the plane's rush to market.
Other victims have apparently already also launched lawsuits.
These are the latest among numerous lawsuits filed on behalf of dozens of crash victims.
Shareholders have also filed suit against Boeing.
Shareholders have filed a lawsuit accusing the company of defrauding them by concealing safety deficiencies in the plane.
 
Boeing 737 whoopsies continue. Fortunately, no fatalities in this incident.

'Boeing 737 jet has skidded and crashed off a runway in a major incident at an airport in Florida. In a miracle rescue, it has been reported all 136 passengers and seven crew on board the aircraft survived the crash. The incident, which occured at about 9.40pm on Friday, saw the Boeing aircraft skid in to the St Johns River in Jacksonville in the north east of the state.

'It is believed the 737 had been chartered by the Department of Defence in the US and was landing after a flight from the naval bases at Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.'


‘Terrifying’: Boeing 737 skids in to river
 

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