Buying/Owning a wood

Wife bought me a "no trespassing" sign for a joke Christmas present.

"Warning - I have a gun and a backhoe".

Both of which are true. Well, a trackhoe, but it'd make short work of a grave :)
 
Mate of mine has a little wood (teehee etc ). mix of pine, ash, cherry (a few) chestnut, holly, hazel. It hadn't really been looked after for a while, lot sof bramble & buried deadfalls
He says:
- clearing paths to get stuff in/wood out is hard work (chain flail/brushcutter, mates with billhooks);
- restrictions on planting, shelters, shooting, archery, bonfires (it's near a road), covenants from when it was part of a larger estate/tied village;
- it either takes time or money or both, even for his own firewood (ex-parks dept tractor, flail, log splitter, shovel/scraper thing, winch, 2 chainsaws);
- it's hard work! even an 18" pine trunk that looks skinny weighs tons. Moving hundredweight chunks of it about from felling site, to slicing/splitting station, to wood store (make yer own out of pallets or metal stillages) is no picnic.
- and it's scary, dealing with a hanging tree or windfall, trying to pull a stump out (then the fun of backfilling it after);
- it is next to a b road, but way out countryside-way, but people still think they can take a few sticks, or logs, or jump over the fence and get stuck in to the evergreens 'because it's christmas and it's only branches and that's only holly';

Having said all that..there are loads of interesting bits, snowdrop patches, odd mosses, vines, wild strawberries & raspberries even;
you get to make forts/shelters and brew-up over your own fire. The dogs love it, robins and ?buzzards watch him work. Pigeons get a facefull of 12bore.
He might be looking at a few grand for a deadfall cherry tree, to the right buyer as is, or after a lot of prep and seasoning.

Anyone know about honey locust of black locust trees? They grow jolly quick and have wicked thorns, potential for coppicing? It's a hardwood, planted quite a lot by London councils at roadside, apparently, because it grows quick.
 
@BossHogg will know the name but their is a national forest next to Keswick (ish) I was there a few years ago and they said they had stopped logging because it was just not competitive.

Others on here know far more than me about timber etc but has the OP looked into aggregating timber for sale as bio-fuel?

The other is briquets. There is a Latvian who is on his way to becoming a millionaire because he supplies Tesco with their BBQ fuel for their Tesco Express chain, but he has had to build scale.

However. good luck.
 
Mate of mine has a little wood (teehee etc ). mix of pine, ash, cherry (a few) chestnut, holly, hazel. It hadn't really been looked after for a while, lot sof bramble & buried deadfalls
He says:
- clearing paths to get stuff in/wood out is hard work (chain flail/brushcutter, mates with billhooks);
- restrictions on planting, shelters, shooting, archery, bonfires (it's near a road), covenants from when it was part of a larger estate/tied village;
- it either takes time or money or both, even for his own firewood (ex-parks dept tractor, flail, log splitter, shovel/scraper thing, winch, 2 chainsaws);
- it's hard work! even an 18" pine trunk that looks skinny weighs tons. Moving hundredweight chunks of it about from felling site, to slicing/splitting station, to wood store (make yer own out of pallets or metal stillages) is no picnic.
- and it's scary, dealing with a hanging tree or windfall, trying to pull a stump out (then the fun of backfilling it after);
- it is next to a b road, but way out countryside-way, but people still think they can take a few sticks, or logs, or jump over the fence and get stuck in to the evergreens 'because it's christmas and it's only branches and that's only holly';

Having said all that..there are loads of interesting bits, snowdrop patches, odd mosses, vines, wild strawberries & raspberries even;
you get to make forts/shelters and brew-up over your own fire. The dogs love it, robins and ?buzzards watch him work. Pigeons get a facefull of 12bore.
He might be looking at a few grand for a deadfall cherry tree, to the right buyer as is, or after a lot of prep and seasoning.

Anyone know about honey locust of black locust trees? They grow jolly quick and have wicked thorns, potential for coppicing? It's a hardwood, planted quite a lot by London councils at roadside, apparently, because it grows quick.
That's what my trackhoe is for. To drop a tree, I dig round the roots and break them, then just push the tree over with the boom. Pick it up with the bucket & thumb round the trunk, and cut the brush off with chainsaws, leaving a trunk in the bucket/thumb jaws. Then dump the trunk in a pile and fill the hole. Takes about an hour to deal with a 30ft cedar tree, including cutting the brush up and burning it. If my trees were much bigger, I'd have to cut the trunk in half to lift it, my machine's only an 8K tiddler.
 
@Ravers has a mate who lives around Newby Bridge - he'll probably remember / know of the small cottage industry that is building up around charcoal and of course, near the Haverthwaite railway heritage centre, is Playdale, who export wood playgrounds to 24 countries around the world. Lots of opportunities.
 
That's what my trackhoe is for. To drop a tree, I dig round the roots and break them, then just push the tree over with the boom. Pick it up with the bucket & thumb round the trunk, and cut the brush off with chainsaws, leaving a trunk in the bucket/thumb jaws. Then dump the trunk in a pile and fill the hole. Takes about an hour to deal with a 30ft cedar tree, including cutting the brush up and burning it. If my trees were much bigger, I'd have to cut the trunk in half to lift it, my machine's only an 8K tiddler.
Nice one! Trying to convince him to get a digger-thingy, even a little 'un, even hire one for a bit. Said I'd gladly camp out, poo in a bag*, eat squirrel, blackberry & ramson stew for a week and just pootle about digging trenches, paths, roots, ampitheatres... Forklifts are fun, backhoes & diggers are better!
* and take it home, not lob it in a tree or wrap it in newspaper & leave on his doorstep aflame. Or pop it in the engine compartment of his landrover, allegedly...
 
One of our customers owns ~200 acres of land near Middlesbrough. He has put fast rotation willow in as it's fairy low lying and damp. It's cropped every 5 years at which time each plant has half a dozen stems of 2-3" thick. It all goes for biomass fuel. He is negotiating to purchase another 400 acres for economies of scale. Not in any way a hobby but a fully fledged business.
 
I worked assorted woodlands for a while, helped one student set up his own charcoal making business, helped out raising pheasants, did coppicing, pond clearances, cleared brash to let some light in, and so on.
If you plan on working it yourself, you need an assistant all the time, if only to drive you to casualty when the Emperor puts in an appearance.
You'll need secure storage for tools, and licences/ courses for power tools like chainsaws.
Or you can invite your local conservation volunteers, who'll both train you and do the grafting for free.


Before you cut anything down, note an oak will take over 20 years to grow, other tree's are similar in time needed.
Do, or have done for you, a proper survey: you may find your wood is home to rare newts or butterflies, for example, or, contrarily, alive with pest species.
I once looked after an unpromising bit of bog, it turned out, on survey, to be a breeding ground for rare birds ( protected species), and home to 30 varieties of sphagnum moss previously unrecorded in the county, which led to assorted visits by university mates of David Bellamy.
In general, it's more work than one can do solo, and the returns won't pay your car fuel, but it's a good hobby experience.
Enjoy!
 
@BossHogg will know the name but their is a national forest next to Keswick (ish) I was there a few years ago and they said they had stopped logging because it was just not competitive.

Others on here know far more than me about timber etc but has the OP looked into aggregating timber for sale as bio-fuel?

The other is briquets. There is a Latvian who is on his way to becoming a millionaire because he supplies Tesco with their BBQ fuel for their Tesco Express chain, but he has had to build scale.

However. good luck.
The only one I can think of is Whinlatter. ;)
 
I'm surprised that no one has asked for shooting rights yet.
@ScaleyAlbereto if you buy the land can I have shooting permission?
 

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