Buying/Owning a wood

#1
Anyone out there with any experience good or bad of buying woodland, managing it & making a bit of money of it by flogging firewood?

I am a couple of years of retirement at 53 & need something p/t or hobbyist to keep myself interested. There are a couple of 6 acre woods very near me for sale, full of oak, pine, larch & sycamore. I like the idea of being outdoors with a bit of hard graft away from people... I also like the idea of enjoying the space & conservation of both wildlife & re planting.

I’ve done a bit of research, as I understand it you can chop 70 trees down every 3 months, which would seem more than enough to make it financially worthwhile as I don’t need to make mega bucks..

However I can imagine there are many pitfalls & the old adage of if it seems to good to be true etc.....

Any arrsers have any experience of this god or bad, nice dream or definite reality?

Edited for mong spelling..
 
#3
I am a couple of years of retirement at 53 & need something p/t or hobbyist to keep myself interested. There are @ couple of 6 acre wood# very near me for sale, full of oak, pine, larch & sycamore.
How much and where !

How many mature trees are there in the 5 acres

Would you not have to replant to replace the trees taken out

What is access like

Archie
 
#5
How much and where !

How many mature trees are there in the 5 acres

Would you not have to replant to replace the trees taken out

What is access like

Archie
North east Derbyshire just outside the peak park.

45k

I am happy to replant, but that is one area I an unsure about in terms of making it all viable.

Access is no issue. Secured track of an A road with own parking/storing area.

I have means to store & season.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#12
You would have to season it first -

Archie
Seasonings a doddle, 1 year per inch thickness, properly planked and stickered under cover. Leave it to do it's thing

Except for the sycamore make sure it's kept in a rain proof shelter, or stored vertically as rainwater will stain it grey and it's useless for nowt but kindling
 
#13
Might be worth investigating charcoal making . I think people have been and more and more will be willing to pay more for a bag of charcoal once they try it . Sustainably sourced rather than crap imported from dubious sources .

We have someone doing it in Oxford who does very well supplying public and high end restaurants who want something that lasts and puts out decent heat .

I bought some myself last year and it was about 20% more expensive than rubbish stuff but a world apart - it burns twice as hot and lasts probably 3 times longer .
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#16
Sounds interesting. Anymore info?
You'll get good prices for seasoned wood from local woodworkers, cabinetmaker, woodturners and the like. More than you would get for firewood. Branches and burls are best for the turners, burl especially sought after and you get premium prices for those. You can dice branches up for wood turning blanks, which you can then season and sell with a decent mark up.

Trunks can be planked, left to season and sold.

First planking you need a friend with a Woodmiser, a portable sawmill. So you can plank in situ, though you can transport it to the mill if you have to.
 
#17
Something I have looked at for a long time. TBH my noodling has come to the conclusion that small scale woodlands, privately owned aren't going to May you money. They are more of a hobby, lifestyle choice.

I looked into the possibility of buying land and turning it into a woodland burial glade, that had legs financially and seemed ethically good business once you have navigated the planning/permission aspect of it

A slightly faster moving and seasonally hands on woodland farming system would be coppicing with staggered stands which I get really excited about

I know people who rent their woods to commercial bushcraft experience/training companies.

All the VERY BIG money Dyson et al are plowing their cash into land as it doesn't attract inheritance tax apparently

But in the end for me it's all about having your very own bit of countryside that you can bimble about

Steer clear of the robbers at woodlandsforsale and woods forsale
 
#18
woodlands.co.uk --- avoid anything sold by them.

We have looked at this as there have been several woodlands for sale near here. Basically, this shower have cropped all the mature wood and left the stuff that needs at least another 25 years to maturity. Their prices are also somewhat steep and access is often difficult or over someone else's land.

Look before you buy. Check the size, type and condition of trees. If it's mostly silver birch then avoid unless you only want it for firewood. Silver birch is an early coloniser and indicates that the wood is immature. Also be careful with woods that are mainly sycamore as these are also often immature and sycamore can be the equivalent of a big weed.

Look for oak, beech, chestnut, hornbeam, yew, maple, whitebeam and box. If it's wet then willow can be pollarded every 10 years or so.

Also good are things like Scots pine, Corsican pine etc. You might also find oddments like walnut and sweet chestnut if you are lucky.

If you want to build a hut then planning permission can be very tricky.
 
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#19
Something I have looked at for a long time. TBH my noodling has come to the conclusion that small scale woodlands, privately owned aren't going to May you money. They are more of a hobby, lifestyle choice.

I looked into the possibility of buying land and turning it into a woodland burial glade, that had legs financially and seemed ethically good business once you have navigated the planning/permission aspect of it

A slightly faster moving and seasonally hands on woodland farming system would be coppicing with staggered stands which I get really excited about

I know people who rent their woods to commercial bushcraft experience/training companies.

All the VERY BIG money dyson et al are plotting their cash into land as it doesn't attract inheritance tax apparently

But in the end for me it's all about having your very own bit of countryside that you can bimble about

Steer clear of the robbers at woodlandsforsale and woods forsale
We have just had a woodland burial place set up in the area I’m looking.

The idea of the lifestyle hobby angle is floating my boat. I don’t need to make a massive amount of money at it fortunately so am in a good position, just don’t want it to be a millstone.

I’ve just found a link to a government grant site for replanting that looks like it’s worth researching. Thanks to @vvaannmmaann. The ones I’m looking at are with woodlands.co.uk
 
#20
woodlands.co.uk --- avoid anything sold by them.

We have looked at this as there have been several woodlands for sale near here. Basically, this shower have cropped all the mature wood and left the stuff that needs at least another 25 years to maturity. Their prices are also somewhat steep and access is often difficult or over someone else's land.

Look before you buy. Check the size, type and condition of trees. If it's mostly silver birch then avoid unless you only want it for firewood. Silver birch is an early coloniser and indicates that the wood is immature. Also be careful with woods that are mainly sycamore as these are also often immature and sycamore can be the equivalent of a big weed.

Look for oak, beech, chestnut, hornbeam, yew, maple, whitebeam and box. If it's wet then willow can be pollarded every 10 years or so.

Also good are things like Scots pine, Cyprus pine etc. You might also find oddments like walnut and sweet chestnut if you are lucky.

If you want to build a hut then planning permission can be very tricky.
Oops. Woodland.co.uk is who is flogging the woods I’m looking at. The woods I’m looking at are mainly pine, oak & larch. The pine is post war, planted back in the day for telegraph poles so very mature
 

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