Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

'Young' lad - I'll take that.
Long keel - check
Many tons of iron in it - check
38hp Beta engine - check
Wheel in cockpit - check
Internal steering/nav station for Scottish waters - check.

Lots in common with Fishers.

View attachment 487985

'Abuse, insult and invective is unacceptable on this board and is not supported in any way by the Management. Patronising guff is the responsibility of the makers of Chardonnay Fine Wines Ltd.'

Fair do's but a certain level of abuse from raggys to stink pots is traditional, if only to celebrate mark a committed move to the dark side.
Ah, now, I have to say that I like the cut of that jib (Have I seen the boat in NI?). I also admit that I thought seriously about taking down the mainmast on my F25, and installing a more powerful engine (the mainmast was in any case a late addition, and was too tall. The motor only 42 hp (2003T) and not fast enough to get me to the Isle of Man without a long leave of absence from taking-out-bin duties). I realised early on that I was a danger to shipping when using windpower, and considered that a full-on Diesel approach would suit my age, gout, diabetes, IBS, cardiac and ill-tempered character.

Son (1st Mate) is good at the intricate aspects of Handling, while I am seasoned and expert at Leading, Managing and Supervising. He's also the junior partner in the enterprise, and shall do what I tell him to do; I'm good in a 'mutiny' situation.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
Ah, now, I have to say that I like the cut of that jib (Have I seen the boat in NI?). I also admit that I thought seriously about taking down the mainmast on my F25, and installing a more powerful engine (the mainmast was in any case a late addition, and was too tall. The motor only 42 hp (2003T) and not fast enough to get me to the Isle of Man without a long leave of absence from taking-out-bin duties). I realised early on that I was a danger to shipping when using windpower, and considered that a full-on Diesel approach would suit my age, gout, diabetes, IBS, cardiac and ill-tempered character.

Son (1st Mate) is good at the intricate aspects of Handling, while I am seasoned and expert at Leading, Managing and Supervising. He's also the junior partner in the enterprise, and shall do what I tell him to do; I'm good in a 'mutiny' situation.
It's probable that she cruised to Ireland quite frequently, at least eight years and two owners back. She will be going again!

I looked at Fishers very seriously, with much the same thoughts about the years to come, but two things, no three things, held me back. The two things being my legs, my maker having generously supplied the standard issue bi-pedal design but come up short to the point of parsimony on the length! This, combined with my sociable nature, I mainly single hand, means freeboard is a significant factor in berthing, along with easy access to a helm. I was mainly looking at Fisher 30s, a great sea boat but with its deep cockpit and high coamings, and knees the first to go, for s/h berthing, not so much. Mandrake's set up, with broad coamings and wide side decks works well* for the short of leg and, hopefully, future proofing.

RIMG0879.JPG


*It doesn't stop me hitting things, but delays the onset of apprehension in those already berthed.
 
It's probable that she cruised to Ireland quite frequently, at least eight years and two owners back. She will be going again!

I looked at Fishers very seriously, with much the same thoughts about the years to come, but two things, no three things, held me back. The two things being my legs, my maker having generously supplied the standard issue bi-pedal design but come up short to the point of parsimony on the length! This, combined with my sociable nature, I mainly single hand, means freeboard is a significant factor in berthing, along with easy access to a helm. I was mainly looking at Fisher 30s, a great sea boat but with its deep cockpit and high coamings, and knees the first to go, for s/h berthing, not so much. Mandrake's set up, with broad coamings and wide side decks works well* for the short of leg and, hopefully, future proofing.

View attachment 488045

*It doesn't stop me hitting things, but delays the onset of apprehension in those already berthed.
It doesn't look like you've got much room for manoeuvre there; do you have warp out?
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
It doesn't look like you've got much room for manoeuvre there; do you have warp out?
Fortunately that was an early berth and the big cruiser was supposed to have moved back to its own berth.
I do sometimes have to warp her out of berths in a couple of places around here, great at sea, but handling her in a marina is very similar to parking this in an underground car park.
AEC_Militant_Mk1,_Abergavenny.jpg

Gets much the same reaction from witnesses too. So I try to go in in the dark.
 

surfincivi

Clanker
One example

Not exactly " most"

In fact most marine engines, especially those operating in seawater, use a heat exchanger.

You will just have to take my word for that.
Raw water filtered and pumped through the block before joining the exhaust on my old Prout, no sign of heat exchanger apart from the hot water system.
 

Truxx

LE
Raw water filtered and pumped through the block before joining the exhaust on my old Prout, no sign of heat exchanger apart from the hot water system.
How old was that?

I think Noas ark might have had a similar set up. Most ( and I say most and not all) systems sold these days are heat exchangers.
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
How old was that?

I think Noas ark might have had a similar set up. Most ( and I say most and not all) systems sold these days are heat exchangers.
Raw water filtered and pumped through the block before joining the exhaust on my old Prout, no sign of heat exchanger apart from the hot water system.
Good to hear, so was my 31ft Westerly! At least you only have one pump to service!
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
Engine water pumps are rarely serviced, not even greased these days. A significant number though are simply swapped out periodically (after many thousands of hours)
It's possible/likely that there are still quite a few sea water direct cooled Bukh engines out there due to their design and longevity. The pump spindle seals can slowly fail and if the consequent sea water dribble from the hole in the pump body is not spotted before it clogs with salt, then salt water leaks in and keeps the engine oil 'topped up(!) It may not be apparent until checking the oil and the level has risen up the dipstick. The engine dipstick, not the dipstick who didn't spot it for several hours.

It would be unkind to ask me how I come to know this.
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
Engine water pumps are rarely serviced, not even greased these days. A significant number though are simply swapped out periodically (after many thousands of hours)
Not to check the condition of water pump at the start of a sailing season is taking a lot on trust, it's so simple, just take the cover off and have a check on the condition of the impeller (even fit a new impeller)
 

Truxx

LE
Not to check the condition of water pump at the start of a sailing season is taking a lot on trust, it's so simple, just take the cover off and have a check on the condition of the impeller (even fit a new impeller)
You can do that on your average jabsco ra w water pump, the one running water from the oggin through the heat exchanger, but to do so on the main engine, generally speaking a marinised plant or automotive engine, is a completely different kettle of fish.

Just as you dont check your car water pump.
 

Truxx

LE
Yes but i used it last summer when I delivered it to its new owner, they are still in use in large quantities.
This debate, such as it is, started when a claim was made that "most" marine engines used raw water cooling.

I simply countered by saying that "most" did, in fact, use some sort of heat exchanger arrangement.
 

rampant

LE
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