Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

Truxx

LE
. . . hence the reason why I usually get anything complicated from the nearest Volvo motor factor.

Stick 'marine' in front of anything and treble the price. :rolleyes:
Ok for the internals, some ancilliaries etc but things like bell housings are, sadly, quite different and appear to be made out of papier mache.

Whatever you do, do not scrimp on sacrificial anodes (especially the ones hidden away in their out drives)
 
Ok for the internals, some ancilliaries etc but things like bell housings are, sadly, quite different and appear to be made out of papier mache.

Whatever you do, do not scrimp on sacrificial anodes (especially the ones hidden away in their out drives)

. . . and the engine anodes.

Sadly, berthing in an active fishing port, the water is almost a living battery, with anodes lasting not much more than a year.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
You could do all that-unfortunately, there is a Notice to Mariners in force nationwide which bluntly states that, if you do move your boat and get into trouble which requires others to come to you (RNLI, Coasties, etc), then you are regarded as having put them in harms way from the Wuhan Misery.

And will be dealt with accordingly. :)
There was gossip about that a yacht sailing in the Clyde region had been collared by the Belfast CG and the poileas* in April/May. Not so often you meet the source of the rumour, but it transpires it was in fact true.

'S' is a an offshore rig worker, 2 weeks on - two weeks off. He lives aboard an immaculate early 80s type Moody 36 and is using the two weeks off time to sail around the UK in stages. Leaving the boat in any suitable and convenient marina during the work interludes, she was berthed in an upper Clyde marina when the lock down was imposed.

Still in his working pattern, eventually he decided to continue with some light local exploration with the marina as base. He'd been out for about a week, using the numerous quiet and remote anchorages around here when he bethought to visit Millport, the tiny town on the island of Great Cumbrae. (Worth a look on Google maps if you don't know it). Not knowing the area he anchored in the charted anchorage, just off the old ferry pier
in the centre of the town (village). A couple of hours later he noticed flashing blue lights approaching the pier
and received a VHF call from Belfast CG**.

Coast Guard insisted he returned to his home port and threatened all sorts of Armageddon should he fail so to do, warning him that he would be under surveillance. Several hours later, on entering the marina, he was greeted by a quadrangle of poileas. 'S' who seems a peaceable sort of chap, asked the assembled guardians of the piece what law he had broken, given that he was a livaboard with no fixed home port and had not stepped off his boat at any time?

They advised that indeed, he had not broken any laws, but that they had been receiving numerous phone calls from alarmed residents of Millport, apparently clutching their pearls and wailing that 'he might come ashore!'
In the febrile tensions of the moment they had felt compelled to act, even though the legal basis was obscure
to the point of non existent.



*Poileas are an added value version of the traditional police, unfortunately, Police Scotland are unable to say what the cost/value increase through rebadging is, claiming they don't actually know. But it wasn't political.

** for the avoidance of confusion amongst those who sail more southern waters, Clyde Coast Guard MRCC is now a block of flats and Belfast CG monitors the area. Splendid folks they are too, but chosen on the grounds of heritage and belief that they would know what a poileas is, allegedly. But it wasn't political.

For further clarification, poileas are pretty much the keepers of the First Minister's piece, whilst, happily, the police remain guardian's of the Queen's peace. Which is entirely political.
 
There was gossip about that a yacht sailing in the Clyde region had been collared by the Belfast CG and the poileas* in April/May. Not so often you meet the source of the rumour, but it transpires it was in fact true.

'S' is a an offshore rig worker, 2 weeks on - two weeks off. He lives aboard an immaculate early 80s type Moody 36 and is using the two weeks off time to sail around the UK in stages. Leaving the boat in any suitable and convenient marina during the work interludes, she was berthed in an upper Clyde marina when the lock down was imposed.

Still in his working pattern, eventually he decided to continue with some light local exploration with the marina as base. He'd been out for about a week, using the numerous quiet and remote anchorages around here when he bethought to visit Millport, the tiny town on the island of Great Cumbrae. (Worth a look on Google maps if you don't know it). Not knowing the area he anchored in the charted anchorage, just off the old ferry pier
in the centre of the town (village). A couple of hours later he noticed flashing blue lights approaching the pier
and received a VHF call from Belfast CG**.

Coast Guard insisted he returned to his home port and threatened all sorts of Armageddon should he fail so to do, warning him that he would be under surveillance. Several hours later, on entering the marina, he was greeted by a quadrangle of poileas. 'S' who seems a peaceable sort of chap, asked the assembled guardians of the piece what law he had broken, given that he was a livaboard with no fixed home port and had not stepped off his boat at any time?

They advised that indeed, he had not broken any laws, but that they had been receiving numerous phone calls from alarmed residents of Millport, apparently clutching their pearls and wailing that 'he might come ashore!'
In the febrile tensions of the moment they had felt compelled to act, even though the legal basis was obscure
to the point of non existent.



*Poileas are an added value version of the traditional police, unfortunately, Police Scotland are unable to say what the cost/value increase through rebadging is, claiming they don't actually know. But it wasn't political.

** for the avoidance of confusion amongst those who sail more southern waters, Clyde Coast Guard MRCC is now a block of flats and Belfast CG monitors the area. Splendid folks they are too, but chosen on the grounds of heritage and belief that they would know what a poileas is, allegedly. But it wasn't political.

For further clarification, poileas are pretty much the keepers of the First Minister's piece, whilst, happily, the police remain guardian's of the Queen's peace. Which is entirely political.
Have a 'Like' and a non-confrontational 'Funny' for first (and probably) last use of 'bethought' on this forum.

Excelsior to you!
 
I am quite pleased with myself. In the space of a week I have turned down bargain basement offers on both a Fairey Huntsman and a British Powerboat Company WW2 vintage Seaplane Tender......

The Huntsman was quite local too, and offered to me at a fraction of the price it would fetch post Covid. The Seaplane tender was in Canvey Island so not quite so accessible.
If it's the 1969 Fairey Huntsman at the top of the 'search' list, it's seriously, grossly overpriced, and really only for sale to someone who cares nothing for the cost. There's a 1963 one there for €195,000 (sale agreed), too. For that amount, I could buy...
 

KnockKnock

Old-Salt
Hmm.



. . . which is why you don't let them get to the stage whereby large amounts of cash change hands.

The bulk of the larger marine diesels are marinised truck engines - indeed, my own Volvo TAMD73's are from that stable. Both now have slightly over 2000 hours on them and are 21 years old. In the grand scheme of things, they're not even run in.

Regular maintenance and not over-servicing them will probably see them last me out.



Nope.

It's fuel.

Berthing costs vary wildly in UK, depending on where you keep the beast.

Fuel costs, however, have you by the balls wherever you are.
The pistons and bores might not even be run in, but hopefully the cooling water has had a filter,?Even so, the previous skipper might have been grounded on a sand bank at some time and in attempting to move off, large amounts of sand/mud can be drawn in and settle in the cooling chambers. I once stripped down a Volvo MD which had two removable bores sleeves, the cooling areas were blocked solid. As to mooring cost v fuel costs, I wasn't certain if the OP was contemplating a sail boat with inboard motor or a motor boat?
 
The pistons and bores might not even be run in, but hopefully the cooling water has had a filter,?Even so, the previous skipper might have been grounded on a sand bank at some time and in attempting to move off, large amounts of sand/mud can be drawn in and settle in the cooling chambers. I once stripped down a Volvo MD which had two removable bores sleeves, the cooling areas were blocked solid. As to mooring cost v fuel costs, I wasn't certain if the OP was contemplating a sail boat with inboard motor or a motor boat?
That you don't understand how the raw water system functions for a marine diesel tells me all that I need to know.
 

clanky

War Hero
There a plenty of 40 plus year old Volvo MD6s still giving sterling service. On my GK29 the cooling water pump had been installed to run backwards by a previous owner. It was only by pure chance that my oppo noticed the problem while I was showing him how to change an impellor prior to his Dayskip course. This was 2 years into my ownership of the boat. So pretty bombproof in my book.
 

Truxx

LE
. . . and the engine anodes.

Sadly, berthing in an active fishing port, the water is almost a living battery, with anodes lasting not much more than a year.
Don't worry. If the anodes disintegrate then the outdrive and bellhousing assemblies will step in and take up the slack.

(been there done that ……...
 

Truxx

LE
If it's the 1969 Fairey Huntsman at the top of the 'search' list, it's seriously, grossly overpriced, and really only for sale to someone who cares nothing for the cost. There's a 1963 one there for €195,000 (sale agreed), too. For that amount, I could buy...
The one I was offered was £7500 for a very quick sale.
 

Truxx

LE
Apparently, you can sell them for just short of £200k; missed a trick there?
Theres a small part of me that thinks that. But I have more than enough projects to keep me going 10 at the last count) and beside, if I had it I would probably want to keep it and then the cash would just drain away.

The Seaplane Tender could have been mine for less than a grand.

My problem is that in my line of work I can buy stuff really well ( see my 10 projects for details) but my luck is such that I am sh1t at selling them as the arrse generally drops out of the market at the very moment the ad goes live.
 

Truxx

LE
Huh! ...Haven't you noticed when a boat is moving with engine on, the cooling water is pumped out over the side.
Both heat exchanger and raw water systems pump out via the exhaust. Keeps the exhaust cool you see, as well as saving on holes in the hull.
 

Truxx

LE
The exhaust is above the waterline so you can see the water coming out when a boat engine is running. The Volvo two cylinder engine I mentioned does not have a heat exchanger.
One example

Not exactly " most"

In fact most marine engines, especially those operating in seawater, use a heat exchanger.

You will just have to take my word for that.
 

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