Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

Quite a few of the pilots in the airline I work for either have classic aircraft or cars or boats as pets and do fettle them. Quite a few also have boats, various and fool around with them, too and in some cases, they are better at maintaining them (the classic aircraft) than airline-bred engineers.
. . . which they can do, unhindered and unbothered (mostly) by any form of oversight.

Your industry is, by it's very nature, ruled and regulated by a plethora of national and international regulatory bodies, particularly for anyone who waves even a 1.5 Allen key at the airframe.

With leisure boats, not so much. Certainly the builders of such craft are ruled and guided by international build regulations: but, once the thing leaves the factory and passes into the hands of it's first owner, it has essentially escaped into the wild. From that point on, certainly within the UK, there's no legislative requirement for any intervention by any third party.

Having said that, craft that live their lives on inland waters are obliged to be assessed so that they comply with the Boat Safety Scheme (BSS): gas supply, power supply (shore and that provided by the boat), escape provision, alarms, crew and pax safety etc. Within the BSS, there are 2 levels of certification: one for Private Hire and one for Private Craft.

. . . but for those craft that are offshore/coastal - not a thing: there is nothing to legislate for the over-monied doughnut from getting his hands on a 30'-50' craft, figuring out how to fire up the engines and away he goes. No legislative requirement for training, insurance, seaworthiness etc.

The only thing that he is obliged to have is a marine SRC-assuming the he has a radio fitted (again, no legislative requirement) and knows how to turn it on.
 
[DRIFT]

Posted just because I have an inexplicable attraction to this series of little ships . . . River Class Minesweepers,

View attachment 381957


View attachment 381956

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search:

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search

[/DRIFT]
Perv. But with a few million pennies, you could make a nice liveaboard on one of those. In a business lounge at Edinburgh airport a short while ago, one of the magazines in the tray dealt with the awful decisions faced by the average multimillionaire on his little boat. In one article some ancient heiress had taken a tugboat and lavished her spare cash on it to become her home-from-home - it was just fabulous, darlink. I think this was it: 1957 Galaz Cant Santiebul Converted Tug Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Meanwhile, I scrape, scrub and wax. It's a hard life.
 
Sodium Hydroxide.

Better known as Caustic Soda. I've learned in the past couple of days one of the elementary lessons of Wisdom; if it hurts you one time, prevent it from doing so the next; your poor memories from last year are no excuse, and 'alkali' is as good as 'acid' for hurt.

I allowed oxalic acid to drip onto my arm and foot while cleaning my teak last year, and it made holes in me. I thought that I had Learned a Lesson, and had become Older and Wiser.

This year, while using the Wessex Teak Cleaner product, and amidst much spraying of water onto my hull and swishing of sponges above head-height, I allowed the diluted liquor to sneak past my gloves and waterproof jacket, and up around my elbow, where it soaked into the sleeve-end of my T-shirt. Unknown to me (it operates in stealth mode; you can't feel any tingle or pain), it then cleaned up my skin and nerve endings, and only when I took off the PPE did I realise that my inner elbow was pink, bright red, grey, dark brown, suppurating and unfeeling. Much irrigation followed, and visits to hospitals, Burns Units and with kind words from kind nurses, who probably thought I was just another idiot - me, who has used acids up to and including HF for many, many years. Yes, afraid so. Feck, fck, fck.
IMGP0003.jpg

The 'safety instructions' on the Wessex bottles don't note that the first 'Cleaner' bottle contains Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH/Caustic Soda) or Potassium Hydroxide (KOH/Caustic Potash), both of which are strongly alkaline and best suited to scouring drains (and better used in reducing murder victims to 'unknown' status than HF - take note, Walter White), merely stating that exposure will cause skin irritation. A slightly deeper search on the internet for the full safety data sheet shows the true nature of the contents. The second stage of the process involves another bottle of 'Renovator', which contains an acid (oxalic - C2H2O4 of previous experience) to neutralise the effects of the first.

Lesson: This stuff will hurt you. Take real, serious precautions with your PPE, you twat, WB.

Positive note: My teak's nice and clean. Haven't got round to 'renovating' yet. Next week, weather permitting. Yeehaa.
 
Sodium Hydroxide.

Better known as Caustic Soda. I've learned in the past couple of days one of the elementary lessons of Wisdom; if it hurts you one time, prevent it from doing so the next; your poor memories from last year are no excuse, and 'alkali' is as good as 'acid' for hurt.

I allowed oxalic acid to drip onto my arm and foot while cleaning my teak last year, and it made holes in me. I thought that I had Learned a Lesson, and had become Older and Wiser.

This year, while using the Wessex Teak Cleaner product, and amidst much spraying of water onto my hull and swishing of sponges above head-height, I allowed the diluted liquor to sneak past my gloves and waterproof jacket, and up around my elbow, where it soaked into the sleeve-end of my T-shirt. Unknown to me (it operates in stealth mode; you can't feel any tingle or pain), it then cleaned up my skin and nerve endings, and only when I took off the PPE did I realise that my inner elbow was pink, bright red, grey, dark brown, suppurating and unfeeling. Much irrigation followed, and visits to hospitals, Burns Units and with kind words from kind nurses, who probably thought I was just another idiot - me, who has used acids up to and including HF for many, many years. Yes, afraid so. Feck, fck, fck.
View attachment 383526
The 'safety instructions' on the Wessex bottles don't note that the first 'Cleaner' bottle contains Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH/Caustic Soda) or Potassium Hydroxide (KOH/Caustic Potash), both of which are strongly alkaline and best suited to scouring drains (and better used in reducing murder victims to 'unknown' status than HF - take note, Walter White), merely stating that exposure will cause skin irritation. A slightly deeper search on the internet for the full safety data sheet shows the true nature of the contents. The second stage of the process involves another bottle of 'Renovator', which contains an acid (oxalic - C2H2O4 of previous experience) to neutralise the effects of the first.

Lesson: This stuff will hurt you. Take real, serious precautions with your PPE, you twat, WB.

Positive note: My teak's nice and clean. Haven't got round to 'renovating' yet. Next week, weather permitting. Yeehaa.
Reiterating my earlier suggestion; hunt the bastard down and crucify him on the mast. Painting teak is treason against wood. And all mankind that perceives beauty in wood. Iron nails, if you please :)
 
Look sore!
 

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