Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

Quite a few of the pilots in the airline I work for either have classic aircraft or cars or boats as pets and do fettle them. Quite a few also have boats, various and fool around with them, too and in some cases, they are better at maintaining them (the classic aircraft) than airline-bred engineers.
. . . which they can do, unhindered and unbothered (mostly) by any form of oversight.

Your industry is, by it's very nature, ruled and regulated by a plethora of national and international regulatory bodies, particularly for anyone who waves even a 1.5 Allen key at the airframe.

With leisure boats, not so much. Certainly the builders of such craft are ruled and guided by international build regulations: but, once the thing leaves the factory and passes into the hands of it's first owner, it has essentially escaped into the wild. From that point on, certainly within the UK, there's no legislative requirement for any intervention by any third party.

Having said that, craft that live their lives on inland waters are obliged to be assessed so that they comply with the Boat Safety Scheme (BSS): gas supply, power supply (shore and that provided by the boat), escape provision, alarms, crew and pax safety etc. Within the BSS, there are 2 levels of certification: one for Private Hire and one for Private Craft.

. . . but for those craft that are offshore/coastal - not a thing: there is nothing to legislate for the over-monied doughnut from getting his hands on a 30'-50' craft, figuring out how to fire up the engines and away he goes. No legislative requirement for training, insurance, seaworthiness etc.

The only thing that he is obliged to have is a marine SRC-assuming the he has a radio fitted (again, no legislative requirement) and knows how to turn it on.
 
[DRIFT]

Posted just because I have an inexplicable attraction to this series of little ships . . . River Class Minesweepers,

View attachment 381957


View attachment 381956

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search:

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search

[/DRIFT]
Perv. But with a few million pennies, you could make a nice liveaboard on one of those. In a business lounge at Edinburgh airport a short while ago, one of the magazines in the tray dealt with the awful decisions faced by the average multimillionaire on his little boat. In one article some ancient heiress had taken a tugboat and lavished her spare cash on it to become her home-from-home - it was just fabulous, darlink. I think this was it: 1957 Galaz Cant Santiebul Converted Tug Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Meanwhile, I scrape, scrub and wax. It's a hard life.
 
Sodium Hydroxide.

Better known as Caustic Soda. I've learned in the past couple of days one of the elementary lessons of Wisdom; if it hurts you one time, prevent it from doing so the next; your poor memories from last year are no excuse, and 'alkali' is as good as 'acid' for hurt.

I allowed oxalic acid to drip onto my arm and foot while cleaning my teak last year, and it made holes in me. I thought that I had Learned a Lesson, and had become Older and Wiser.

This year, while using the Wessex Teak Cleaner product, and amidst much spraying of water onto my hull and swishing of sponges above head-height, I allowed the diluted liquor to sneak past my gloves and waterproof jacket, and up around my elbow, where it soaked into the sleeve-end of my T-shirt. Unknown to me (it operates in stealth mode; you can't feel any tingle or pain), it then cleaned up my skin and nerve endings, and only when I took off the PPE did I realise that my inner elbow was pink, bright red, grey, dark brown, suppurating and unfeeling. Much irrigation followed, and visits to hospitals, Burns Units and with kind words from kind nurses, who probably thought I was just another idiot - me, who has used acids up to and including HF for many, many years. Yes, afraid so. Feck, fck, fck.
IMGP0003.jpg

The 'safety instructions' on the Wessex bottles don't note that the first 'Cleaner' bottle contains Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH/Caustic Soda) or Potassium Hydroxide (KOH/Caustic Potash), both of which are strongly alkaline and best suited to scouring drains (and better used in reducing murder victims to 'unknown' status than HF - take note, Walter White), merely stating that exposure will cause skin irritation. A slightly deeper search on the internet for the full safety data sheet shows the true nature of the contents. The second stage of the process involves another bottle of 'Renovator', which contains an acid (oxalic - C2H2O4 of previous experience) to neutralise the effects of the first.

Lesson: This stuff will hurt you. Take real, serious precautions with your PPE, you twat, WB.

Positive note: My teak's nice and clean. Haven't got round to 'renovating' yet. Next week, weather permitting. Yeehaa.
 
Sodium Hydroxide.

Better known as Caustic Soda. I've learned in the past couple of days one of the elementary lessons of Wisdom; if it hurts you one time, prevent it from doing so the next; your poor memories from last year are no excuse, and 'alkali' is as good as 'acid' for hurt.

I allowed oxalic acid to drip onto my arm and foot while cleaning my teak last year, and it made holes in me. I thought that I had Learned a Lesson, and had become Older and Wiser.

This year, while using the Wessex Teak Cleaner product, and amidst much spraying of water onto my hull and swishing of sponges above head-height, I allowed the diluted liquor to sneak past my gloves and waterproof jacket, and up around my elbow, where it soaked into the sleeve-end of my T-shirt. Unknown to me (it operates in stealth mode; you can't feel any tingle or pain), it then cleaned up my skin and nerve endings, and only when I took off the PPE did I realise that my inner elbow was pink, bright red, grey, dark brown, suppurating and unfeeling. Much irrigation followed, and visits to hospitals, Burns Units and with kind words from kind nurses, who probably thought I was just another idiot - me, who has used acids up to and including HF for many, many years. Yes, afraid so. Feck, fck, fck.
View attachment 383526
The 'safety instructions' on the Wessex bottles don't note that the first 'Cleaner' bottle contains Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH/Caustic Soda) or Potassium Hydroxide (KOH/Caustic Potash), both of which are strongly alkaline and best suited to scouring drains (and better used in reducing murder victims to 'unknown' status than HF - take note, Walter White), merely stating that exposure will cause skin irritation. A slightly deeper search on the internet for the full safety data sheet shows the true nature of the contents. The second stage of the process involves another bottle of 'Renovator', which contains an acid (oxalic - C2H2O4 of previous experience) to neutralise the effects of the first.

Lesson: This stuff will hurt you. Take real, serious precautions with your PPE, you twat, WB.

Positive note: My teak's nice and clean. Haven't got round to 'renovating' yet. Next week, weather permitting. Yeehaa.
Reiterating my earlier suggestion; hunt the bastard down and crucify him on the mast. Painting teak is treason against wood. And all mankind that perceives beauty in wood. Iron nails, if you please :)
 
Look sore!
 
2019.jpg


Back in. Note the loose triatic stay (it's the wire between the tops of the masts) , which a Channel Islander In Charge (never a good idea) insisted I pull down to allow the crane's slings to work (wrong). Getting it back onto the block at the top of the mizzen was interesting, and involved lashing an extensible ladder to the mizzen at 3' intervals from the wheelhouse roof, avoiding the radar obstacle, wriggling through the wires and only falling once.

This post is dedicated to DuoDerm ExtraThin hydrocolloid and Aquacel Ag Extra dressings.
 
View attachment 391481

Back in. Note the loose triatic stay (it's the wire between the tops of the masts) , which a Channel Islander In Charge (never a good idea) insisted I pull down to allow the crane's slings to work (wrong). Getting it back onto the block at the top of the mizzen was interesting, and involved lashing an extensible ladder to the mizzen at 3' intervals from the wheelhouse roof, avoiding the radar obstacle, wriggling through the wires and only falling once.

This post is dedicated to DuoDerm ExtraThin hydrocolloid and Aquacel Ag Extra dressings.
Looks nice.
 
...feels good...


I got rid of that flapping cable at the back, too; the aerial is one from an ancient piece of direction-finding equipment which has been in the garage for over a year, and possibly worth something on eBay. Looking forward to some nice line-caught cod and a little cava/Pinot Noir in coming months. Not to mention the whisky and superb sleep. Damn; mentioned the whisky.
 
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Anyone recommend a book on maritime law suited to private boat owners ? covering areas such as anchoring / mooring , legal requirements for your boat , customs etc
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
[DRIFT]

Posted just because I have an inexplicable attraction to this series of little ships . . . River Class Minesweepers,

View attachment 381957


View attachment 381956

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search:

photos River Class Minesweepers - Google Search

[/DRIFT]
I thought that was my old RNR tender for a minute, HMS Humber.
Sister ship M2008 - Waveney?
( I didn't know she had susbsequently transferred to the Fisheries sqn.)

If you are ever in HMS President's wardroom they have/had? an oil painting of Humber which was done by my son's godfather, when he was a killick bunting at President.
 
Anyone recommend a book on maritime law suited to private boat owners ? covering areas such as anchoring / mooring , legal requirements for your boat , customs etc
Oddly, I've never heard of such a thing, but I'm sure there is. Most of my literature is more on the practical side, and to do with the 'rules' more than the 'law'. I'll ask and get back.
 
Looking good, @Whiskybreath - back in the environment which suits it best.

. . . though I notice a couple of lazy lines, there . . .

*sniff*
The comment of a genuine sailorman; initially complimentary, then critical, leading to a lengthy, well-practised and curly-lipped sneer. Very like the reception I get when docking at my berth, usually.
 
View attachment 391481

Back in. Note the loose triatic stay (it's the wire between the tops of the masts) , which a Channel Islander In Charge (never a good idea) insisted I pull down to allow the crane's slings to work (wrong). Getting it back onto the block at the top of the mizzen was interesting, and involved lashing an extensible ladder to the mizzen at 3' intervals from the wheelhouse roof, avoiding the radar obstacle, wriggling through the wires and only falling once.

This post is dedicated to DuoDerm ExtraThin hydrocolloid and Aquacel Ag Extra dressings.
Try and get Your hands on an old SAR winchmans harness by GQ, the parachute equipment manufacturer.Very handy for work aloft.
 
Anyone recommend a book on maritime law suited to private boat owners ? covering areas such as anchoring / mooring , legal requirements for your boat , customs etc
Such a single reference work doesn't exist, really: most (if not all) sea ports, marinas, docks, etc will be ruled and guided by their own by-laws.

Fr'instance, the rules for transit into and down Southampton Water will vary considerably to those here at Milford Haven.

. . . if, however, you really want your eyes to glaze over really quickly then treat yourself to a read of COLREGS, the International Maritime Organisation equivalence of Horlicks:

http://www.imo.org/en/Publications/Documents/Supplements and CDs/English/QB904E_012016.pdf
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It’s been nearly two years since I bought my boat and apart from a quick razz around the harbour when I bought it, I’m still yet to get it out.

A combination of factors.

Erring on the side of caution I’m refraining from towing it again until I have done my trailer license. I have no idea how much it weighs and the law’s regarding what you can and can’t tow completely ******* baffles me.

The tyres on the trailer are all fucked and are a weird (expensive) size. I just haven’t been arsed to sort these.

Launching it on Ullswater (my nearest lake) has proven difficult. My only attempt to get on the water failed spectacularly when I couldn’t find anywhere steep enough to launch it. I had water up to the arches on my Landy and the boat still wouldn’t float off the trailer.

I have an auxiliary outboard for it that a mate gave me for free. I’d like to get this running before taking the family out in it, just in case.

Other than that it’s going great.

Plan for this year is to get it serviced and bite the bullet and just pay for a mooring so I can eliminate the towing problem.

D594ECD6-D59A-4457-9457-D7B1D42BC421.jpeg
 

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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
There are, of course, days when the millstone of boat ownership fades into the background and you can finally justify the eye-watering expense of it all: last Sunday was just such a day:

View attachment 343950

A pod of about 8 (including two young ones, who seemed to be bolted to the sides of their mothers) played fast and loose with us for nearly an hour.

I'm not sure who spotted who first: a dorsal fin was seen some distance off and before you knew it, the sleek buggers were playing chicken runs under the keel ('Get away from there, you stupid mammals! I have no wish to be offering Propeller Sliced Dolphin Baby, Served On A Bed Of Rice!') and then playing 'chase' in the wake as we passed by.

And all that at just 3 miles South of Angle Point, Pembrokeshire.
Beautiful down there, sailed out of Dale in another century.

More recently, filming aboard the SS Shieldhall just off St Catherine's Point in the Solent 2 years ago..... just three dolphins but made everyone's day. I've also spotted them off Browndown on occasions.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
What would something like the Southern Star weigh? Couple hundred tons?

The thing that struck me is the comparatively weedy motors, only 240hp apiece. Crossing the oceans must be a rough gig at 9 kt. I saw she was built in Australia, registered in Nassau (though doesn't necessarily mean she's been there), and is now in Glasgow. So she's been about a bit.
A gaggle of the River class minesweepers , as pictured by RCT(V) upthread did a Transatlantic hop in the mid 80s....I missed out, danggit. They cruised across from Liverpool if memory serves, to Halifax, Nova Scotia and back.
(feasability trip, to see if they could work with a RAS , which they succesfully completed, just about ! )
 

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