Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

Pessimists everywhere. But as with @FourZeroCharlie's issue, a logical approach to the problem, a rational think through the options, advice from credible third-parties, a stiff Lagavulin and a wodge of cash will make it happen.
 
Pessimists everywhere. But as with @FourZeroCharlie's issue, a logical approach to the problem, a rational think through the options, advice from credible third-parties, a stiff Lagavulin and a wodge of cash will make it happen.
To save some of the WorldWideWeb pixels, I'll not quote your post with the images, but it's quite probable that you do have a rather mature version of (or, at least, some of the component parts of) a fluxgate compass as this thing:



could be the magnetometer. My own system is probably just above the Nokia 3310 scale of these equipments: the saloon helm station is fitted with this:



. . . though you have my deepest sympathy as I share your grief and potential loss of sanity whilst you grapple with boat wiring looms.
 
Find yourself an aircraft avionics guy. If they can trace a fault in a 100' aircraft, then a 43 foot boat wont be so hard. They are generally tidier than motor or boat electricians, tend to be very good troubleshooters and, because they won't have to sign for anything 'cos it's a boat, won't charge you full whack and will often accept grog in part payment.
 
Find yourself an aircraft avionics guy. If they can trace a fault in a 100' aircraft, then a 43 foot boat wont be so hard. They are generally tidier than motor or boat electricians, tend to be very good troubleshooters and, because they won't have to sign for anything 'cos it's a boat, won't charge you full whack and will often accept grog in part payment.
I thank you for your opinion and, normally, I would give you Ta Muchly for the advice.

. . . except we are talking 'boat', here. A 21-year old boat. That has passed through the hands of 6 previous 'hands on' boat DIYers.

If I could trace and remove all the redundant cabling that vanishes into the gloom between the outer and inner skins, I'd probably knock half a ton of the weight and add 5kts at Wide Open Throttle.
 
I thank you for your opinion and, normally, I would give you Ta Muchly for the advice.

. . . except we are talking 'boat', here. A 21-year old boat. That has passed through the hands of 6 previous 'hands on' boat DIYers.

If I could trace and remove all the redundant cabling that vanishes into the gloom between the outer and inner skins, I'd probably knock half a ton of the weight and add 5kts at Wide Open Throttle.
Just a random thought - could you not rip it out and start again with something hi-tech like fibre optic? You would then (I presume) just need one cable since I am guessing you use most of the cabling for sensors and controls? Or maybe not - a lot of power cables?
 
Just a random thought - could you not rip it out and start again with something hi-tech like fibre optic? You would then (I presume) just need one cable since I am guessing you use most of the cabling for sensors and controls? Or maybe not - a lot of power cables?
Yes, I could-and probably spend up to 50% more than the boat is worth.

For a start off, the 2 very large Swedish green lumps in the engine bay are older technology (Volvo TAMD 63Ps) and these cannot be modified for fibre/FBW. Thus, the engine controls are cable and have to remain so-unless I go for a complete double engine upgrade.

. . . and that is many, many 000s of your British pounds.
 
Yes, I could-and probably spend up to 50% more than the boat is worth.

For a start off, the 2 very large Swedish green lumps in the engine bay are older technology (Volvo TAMD 63Ps) and these cannot be modified for fibre/FBW. Thus, the engine controls are cable and have to remain so-unless I go for a complete double engine upgrade.

. . . and that is many, many 000s of your British pounds.
I thought there was a "fibre to cabinet" conversion available for them, with fibre from the helm to a "black box" by the engines & leccy & control being sorted in the box.
 
I thought there was a "fibre to cabinet" conversion available for them, with fibre from the helm to a "black box" by the engines & leccy & control being sorted in the box.
As far as I'm aware, only those boats that have NMEA 2000 fit and then not all VP engines are compatible: remember, VP TAMD63Ps ceased to be manufactured about 12(?) years ago . . . AND it is eye-wateringly expensive to do so :cool:
 
...as if it isn't enough fun to do a bit of scraping and dredging in the bilges. Mine was built in 1976, and the number of enthusiasts who have tinkered, and their wizzy ideas (usually involving drilling holes in random places) is appalling. I found a couple of full cable runs ending in sockets for electronic equipment today, one of which has an aerial on my mizzen, which I'd previously deliberately disregarded as being unlikely to be important and too difficult to bother with. I like the 'Dymo' idea above c/o @jellyvodka .
 
I thank you for your opinion and, normally, I would give you Ta Muchly for the advice.

. . . except we are talking 'boat', here. A 21-year old boat. That has passed through the hands of 6 previous 'hands on' boat DIYers.

If I could trace and remove all the redundant cabling that vanishes into the gloom between the outer and inner skins, I'd probably knock half a ton of the weight and add 5kts at Wide Open Throttle.
How old do you think airliners are?! How many owners do you think they have had?! Really, try and find an Avionics guy to trace and sort out your wiring. The least they can do is isolate the useless stuff from the usable stuff, improve the labelling and tidy the whole plot up....and if they are any good, at all, they'll draw up a basic wiring diagram. I use an Avo friend to deal with snags I encounter on classic aircraft such as old Jodels and Cubs. The breed tend to be good at retrofits of radios/troubleshooting/identification,etc so it's worth making the effort to find one.
 
...oh, and the bright spark who installed my radar set used brass crosshead screws to secure the fastener on the aerial cable to the solid aluminium block on the back of the VDU. I'll have to saw the bloody thing off now. Jeez.
 
How old do you think airliners are?! How many owners do you think they have had?! Really, try and find an Avionics guy to trace and sort out your wiring. The least they can do is isolate the useless stuff from the usable stuff, improve the labelling and tidy the whole plot up....and if they are any good, at all, they'll draw up a basic wiring diagram. I use an Avo friend to deal with snags I encounter on classic aircraft such as old Jodels and Cubs. The breed tend to be good at retrofits of radios/troubleshooting/identification,etc so it's worth making the effort to find one.
Sound advice-though I'm unsure if the airline operating said airliner allow the Captain/First Officer to rootle around the fuselage, under the cargo bay, etc because he wants to wire in some new speakers . . . :cool:
 
Just a random thought - could you not rip it out and start again with something hi-tech like fibre optic? You would then (I presume) just need one cable since I am guessing you use most of the cabling for sensors and controls? Or maybe not - a lot of power cables?
I'm not sneering at your post, just chuckling. Post #865 refers.
 
I'm not sneering at your post, just chuckling. Post #865 refers.
Thinking about it later I would guess you need some sort of server/black box to send the signals through so you would just be adding to the complexity. Still, I am persuaded there is an answer...
 
How old do you think airliners are?! How many owners do you think they have had?! Really, try and find an Avionics guy to trace and sort out your wiring. The least they can do is isolate the useless stuff from the usable stuff, improve the labelling and tidy the whole plot up....and if they are any good, at all, they'll draw up a basic wiring diagram. I use an Avo friend to deal with snags I encounter on classic aircraft such as old Jodels and Cubs. The breed tend to be good at retrofits of radios/troubleshooting/identification,etc so it's worth making the effort to find one.
The wiring diagram or rather a schematic is the first port of call (SWIDT...), i.e what is working/not working, what wiring should be in place then work back. Or perhaps not, given the picture earlier...
 
Sound advice-though I'm unsure if the airline operating said airliner allow the Captain/First Officer to rootle around the fuselage, under the cargo bay, etc because he wants to wire in some new speakers . . . :cool:
Quite a few of the pilots in the airline I work for either have classic aircraft or cars or boats as pets and do fettle them. Quite a few also have boats, various and fool around with them, too and in some cases, they are better at maintaining them (the classic aircraft) than airline-bred engineers.
 

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