Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

It's a thole.

It's where the thole pin fits.
I was just waiting for someone to spot that. Well done that oarsman.
IMG_0445[7478].jpg

Seems to have been cut in half along the green line above; it's a bit rougher there than elsewhere. No screwholes on it, though, must have just been glued to the gunwale. Why the previous owner decided to glue it to the doorframe and paint over it is a mystery (unless a previous-previous owner wanted to keep it there as the Ship's Tripping Stud, which would be a seamanlike solution, and the previous owner thought: "that's a good idea. I shall paint it shit-brown and all shall admire my handiwork".
 
I always liked these. Slides over the mud flats and even wet grass. Saw lots of them on the Georgian coast round Savannah. Ideal for fishing, beer drinking and feeding the mozzies

.
screw boat.jpg
 
I was just waiting for someone to spot that. Well done that oarsman.
View attachment 378667
Seems to have been cut in half along the green line above; it's a bit rougher there than elsewhere. No screwholes on it, though, must have just been glued to the gunwale. Why the previous owner decided to glue it to the doorframe and paint over it is a mystery (unless a previous-previous owner wanted to keep it there as the Ship's Tripping Stud, which would be a seamanlike solution, and the previous owner thought: "that's a good idea. I shall paint it shit-brown and all shall admire my handiwork".
When your are under sail next season you'll find yourself with a line you need to tie off exactly where that bracket is.
 
When your are under sail next season you'll find yourself with a line you need to tie off exactly where that bracket is.
You would think so, but for the fact that the 'ole part was about .5cm from the bulkhead, facing it, and being glued on to the doorframe with some sort of silicone product (as well as brown paint), had no strength to hold anything much. It seemed to serve no purpose whatever other than to box in some wiring running up the frame (which was redundant and now in the bin).

Anyway, sod sail. I got diesel.
 
Apologies to everyone else, but while rummaging around in my boaty directory for instructions on the use of Starbrite this popped up for @Roadster280 's benefit. Mmmmm, feel the burn...
IMGP1424.jpg
 
a money pit in the water, survey costs, fuel, insurance, rya training, life crafts/jackets and depreciation.
apart from that fun and enjoyable but expect to pay big bills when something goes wrong if old.
 
Apologies to everyone else, but while rummaging around in my boaty directory for instructions on the use of Starbrite this popped up for @Roadster280 's benefit. Mmmmm, feel the burn...
View attachment 378967
I wonder what the RN would have done a century ago, if some hapless AB had painted the teak decking?

When did they phase out keelhauling?
 
a money pit in the water, survey costs, fuel, insurance, rya training, life crafts/jackets and depreciation.
apart from that fun and enjoyable but expect to pay big bills when something goes wrong if old.
There is truth in the old adage 'Think of your worst enemy, the one person in the world that you loathe and despise over all others. Got him? Good-now, go and buy him a boat'.
 
I wonder what the RN would have done a century ago, if some hapless AB had painted the teak decking?

When did they phase out keelhauling?
Oddly, perhaps, sometimes I try to put myself in the place of that AB while scraping/sanding/polishing, for motivation. Buggered if I'd want to do it on a 74-gun ship of the line.
 
I was just waiting for someone to spot that. Well done that oarsman.
View attachment 378667
Seems to have been cut in half along the green line above; it's a bit rougher there than elsewhere. No screwholes on it, though, must have just been glued to the gunwale. Why the previous owner decided to glue it to the doorframe and paint over it is a mystery (unless a previous-previous owner wanted to keep it there as the Ship's Tripping Stud, which would be a seamanlike solution, and the previous owner thought: "that's a good idea. I shall paint it shit-brown and all shall admire my handiwork".
Might have been mounted to have a bolt put through it, in order to hold the door open at sea?
 
Might have been mounted to have a bolt put through it, in order to hold the door open closed at sea?
I believe you may be right, although from the photo it seems he used it as a clip to hold that cable behind it (going to a B&G Homer5 aerial, now discarded). It certainly wouldn't have been able to take the stress of a heavy door trying to slide open. I've found an old photo from the first phase of restoration:
IMGP1474.jpg


I was, of course, wondering who would be first to see that (again).
Not something us proper seamen would think of doing, but I suppose a previous owner had flatus on his brain at the time.
 
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I thought it was a "tuit" , you know one of those "round tuit's"!
I have a few 'thuds' around the boat, but again, they're explainable in proper oceangoing maritime jargon to those not in the know, although I do have to be careful that some sod isn't up on marine technology and contradicts my explanation. They don't get invited on board again.
 
~Tales Of A Bitching Leisure Boat Owner~

~Part The Twenty Third~

Oft times, myself and @Whiskybreath have bemoaned our lot with regard to the cost of 'stuff' as soon as you put 'Marine' in front of the item. This is a short tale of one such bit of 'stuff'.

Here is the beast:

Rudder indicator 1.jpg


The sender unit for a rudder position indicator. A fairly inoffensive little thing, it sits happily up the stern end of the boat and gets on with . . . well . . . doing not much, tbh. The upright arm is connected to a horizontal arm by means of a small ball and socket arrangement and the horizontal arm is, in turn, connected by a similar ball and socket arrangement to an arm from one of the rudders-thus, the whole thing mirrors the movement of the rudders and sends that information by an electrical pulse to a digital/analogue read out up to the helm positions.

Here's the thing disassembled:

Rudder indicator 2.jpg


It's low tech stuff (my boat is 21 years old and I suspect that this is the original unit): simply, it is an alloy case with a potentiometer and a mechanical arm.

Only it's stopped indicating the rudder position.

Which, as I said, is no real drama: indeed, there is a secondary digital unit at both helm stations which is fine and dandy.

However, this is a niggly thing and needs to be fettled.

Thus it has been dismounted and placed before Hairy Dave, the tame electrician, so that he may work many wriggly amp wonders on it's form.

As a Plan B, he and I had a browse at some trade sites to price up a replacement if life cannot be breathed back into this little box of magic.

£335.

ex-VAT.

W the very F?

Woman was not amused when I pointed out that she can function reasonably well with only one kidney . . .
 

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