Buying a boat , fantasy or reality?............

Speaking of 'liveaboards', there's a chap in my marina who spends most of his week on his speedboat with his wife, day and night. We always wave at each other when I go past, but I've not said more than 'yo-ho-ho' on the pontoon, as he's usually a bit wendy and weavy to be honest. His boat is about 5m in length and has a small cuddy forward, with a big canvas canopy aft. Why the hell he does it I've no idea (other than the grunts and moans which occasionally emanate therefrom), but I do know that his engine's been knacked for months. Living the dream, I suppose.

Dicky eyes and feet have kept me from sleeping on board recently, but not from searching the coast for fish and occasionally just heading out, far from land, to drift, read and listen to good music. A pal gave me a bucket of crabs from his pots yesterday and minor injuries aside, have been delicious. He also advises me on basic seamanship, and ignores my experimental docking manoeuvres.
 

Even if the prices are now eleven years old, these still seem to have been a "Good Buy" for someone!

Where's my lottery ticket? ;) .

Originally published 14 APRIL 2007 . . .

" . . . the three ships - HMS Dulverton, Brecon and Cottesmore, which cost £35million each when they were built in the Eighties - are now likely to be sold to a foreign navy or commercial buyers for as little as £200,000 each".

View attachment 334953

For sale to a foreign navy, the British warships that could have saved hostages | Daily Mail Online
I posted on the The UK/European migrant problem thread, the reason I had/have been looking at a certain type of boat.

It would probably be appropriate to copy that post here . . . ;) .

I did enquire of our Govt about a "Letter of Marque". Got no reply :( .

Was quite happy then and now, to let the buggers spend all their money, wait, and then sink the inflatables - and even the NGO rescue "taxi" ships - off the Libyan coast.

I wasn't quite that explicit in my letter to the Govt . . . merely refering to "measures to deter the continuing flow of migrants". ;) .
 
The process of stepping a new mast:

New mast.jpg


None of yer polycarbonate nonsense, here: good, old-fashioned wood.

The boat is a converted gaff rigged drifter, which is now used as a live-aboard. The owner has not been able to accurately date it's build, but I dare say the beast will be around long after most of us have gone.

Which is nice.
 
The process of stepping a new mast:

View attachment 342744

None of yer polycarbonate nonsense, here: good, old-fashioned wood.

The boat is a converted gaff rigged drifter, which is now used as a live-aboard. The owner has not been able to accurately date it's build, but I dare say the beast will be around long after most of us have gone.

Which is nice.
Beautiful job. There are far too few gaff rigs about these days. I trust matey had an appropriate coin at the foot of said mast when it was stepped.
 
Beautiful job. There are far too few gaff rigs about these days. I trust matey had an appropriate coin at the foot of said mast when it was stepped.
He's looking to take it sailing, hence the refurbed mast-IF he manages to get it out this season, it will be a thing of beauty.

Mind, the damned thing is nearly 30t-which is a lot of boat going sideways at slow speed when a puff of wind takes it!
 
Back in the 90's on a couple or three canal boat holidays, I encountered issues with low water levels. One was probably due to other users farting about and missetting the locks. We had to wait until the pond had filled before we could move. If I recall correctly all was well from the Shroppy up to Chirk. Upwards of Chirk on the approach to Llangollen, it's not so much a canal as a navigable feeder on a very slight incline. We barely made it up part of that section. We also knew that the Oxford canal had water level issues so didn't go on that one. Every so often some boat or road vehicle will damage or block a section and that can last for weeks. Longer boats of 67' to 72' have more room but are harder to maneuver, (three point turns :lol:), catch the wind which is a PITA and are more prone to getting caught on lock sills :skull:. I did consider one day getting a 56' boat but thought about costs, moorings, mongs and water levels. Which leads us to one of the driest summers and the closure of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal due to drought.

Hot weather closes 55 miles of canal

1532220914926.png
 
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There are, of course, days when the millstone of boat ownership fades into the background and you can finally justify the eye-watering expense of it all: last Sunday was just such a day:

Dolphins off Angle Point-Sun 22 Jul 18.JPG


A pod of about 8 (including two young ones, who seemed to be bolted to the sides of their mothers) played fast and loose with us for nearly an hour.

I'm not sure who spotted who first: a dorsal fin was seen some distance off and before you knew it, the sleek buggers were playing chicken runs under the keel ('Get away from there, you stupid mammals! I have no wish to be offering Propeller Sliced Dolphin Baby, Served On A Bed Of Rice!') and then playing 'chase' in the wake as we passed by.

And all that at just 3 miles South of Angle Point, Pembrokeshire.
 
They truly are fascinating creatures.

With the engines in neutral, they seemed content to pootle around the hull for a bit and then, as if it was a group decision, decided, 'Meh. Booorrrring!' and off they went.

Only when I'd started to move at a bit of speed did they suddenly reappear and continue the previous game of 'Chase'.

Dolphins-again.JPG
 

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