Bush admits secret CIA terror detentions

#1
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush acknowledged on Wednesday the CIA had interrogated dozens of terrorism suspects at secret overseas locations and said 14 of those held had been sent to the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay.

Bush made the surprise admission as he prodded the U.S. Congress to approve rules for military commissions to try such detainees and with national security a key issue for Republicans who face the possibility of losses in the November congressional elections.

"The need for this legislation is urgent," Bush said. "We need to ensure that those questioning terrorists can continue to do everything within the limit of the law to get information that can save American lives."


Bush was forced to come up with a new method to try foreign terrorist suspects after the U.S. Supreme Court in June rejected the military tribunal system his administration set up to try Guantanamo prisoners, most captured in Afghanistan.

The Pentagon said the 14 detainees arrived at Guantanamo, where they could face prosecution, on Monday from undisclosed locations. Among them were the suspected mastermind of the September 11 attacks, Khalid Sheik Mohammed and two other al Qaeda leaders, Ramzi Binalshibh and Abu Zubaydah.

Bush strongly defended the secret detention and questioning of terrorism suspects and said the CIA treated them humanely and did not torture. His announcement was greeted with some skepticism by human rights activists. The detention program, disclosed last year by The Washington Post, provoked an international outcry.
http://today.reuters.com/news/artic...src=090606_1816_TOPSTORY_cia_program_revealed

Secret? In other shocking news , Fire is hot, and water is wet.
 
#3
SkiCarver said:
George w bush, guardian of truth, justice and the american way.

SC
now while I get the inherent, healthy dose of sarcasm in that sentence many (especially those from "o'er the pond") may not... perhaps we could have 'sarcasm' smiley...

:lol:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/expatscot/FASCISM_NOT_US.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/expatscot/be_afraid.jpg

EDIT:- cannot claim responsibility for the above 'altered images' - found them on the web some time ago.
 
#4
PJ, you are correct, my apologies to any septics on the forum who took offence. :lol:

no offence was intended.

SC.

Edited to change the emoticon.
 
#5
Seriously, I simply wanted to emphasize that this is another example of the dichotomy between what the US practices, (rendition, guantanamo bay) and what it preaches. (freedom, justice, equality) I did not intend to contribute to another 'america bashing' thread.



SC.
 
#6
SkiCarver said:
Seriously, I simply wanted to emphasize that this is another example of the dichotomy between what the US practices, (rendition, guantanamo bay) and what it preaches. (freedom, justice, equality) I did not intend to contribute to another 'america bashing' thread.



SC.
understood :wink:
 
#7
SkiCarver said:
Seriously, I simply wanted to emphasize that this is another example of the dichotomy between what the US practices, (rendition, guantanamo bay) and what it preaches. (freedom, justice, equality) I did not intend to contribute to another 'america bashing' thread.



SC.
well will remove the images that seem to cause the risk of US bashing - wasnt exactly wanting to get peoples undies wadded up.

although I do think they illustrated the point - although a certain amount of 'tongue in cheek' was need (exactly how much depends on your view point.
 
#8
Personally I dont see the problem. If these terrorists committed more acts then people would be up in arms asking why nothing was being done. When something is done that infringes upon their "rights" the same people are up in arms about that. If these prisons save lives then surely they are a good thing.
 
#9
Now that the Shrub has admitted it I wonder what those who said it wasn't/couldn't be true have to say to themselves?

We discussed the possiblity on this thread

EU and US Secret Prisons
a while ago.

Is Tomahawk still around?
 
#10
I'm left wondering why has he decided to 'admit' it openly now?

What's going on? :?

I suspect there is more to this than just an 'admission'.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#11
If he'd kept his mouth shut he, they could have been topped and no one would know about it. Well, not until a leak sprung from the White House.
 
#13
Rudolph_Hucker said:
I'm left wondering why has he decided to 'admit' it openly now?

What's going on? :?

I suspect there is more to this than just an 'admission'.

Well, as a matter of pure coincidence, :wink: the House and Senate are currently debating bills aimed at providing new measures to try suspected terrorists- after the Supreme Court ruled that the original system of military tribunals was ruled unconstitutional. Unfortunately for the Administration and Congressional Republicans, it would appear that military lawyers aren't very big fans of the new proposals either. Maj Gen Scott Black, the Army Judge Advocate General, has testified today that he opposes the plans, especially the prosection's right to withold evidence from the defence:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060907/ap_on_go_co/detainees_legislation_5
 
#14
Have I missed the part where the actual countries where these secret gaols are ?
 
#15
The whole idea of taking suspects out of the US was to remain within the law. It enabled the men in suits to do things legally in those countries that they couldn't do in the States. Despite squeals from liberals, the US acted legally. It's unpleasant certainly, but so was 9/11.

If the CIA were able to just extract informaton totally regardless of human rights, the suspects would be fish food off Miami right now, having lost much of their minds and most of their genitals.
 
#16
European states urged to come clean on CIA jails

By Darren Ennis

STRASBOURG, France (Reuters) - European lawmakers demanded on Thursday that their governments reveal the location of secret CIA prisons after U.S. President George Bush admitted Washington held terrorist suspects in jails abroad.

Bush said on Wednesday the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) had interrogated dozens of suspects at undisclosed overseas locations and the last 14 of those held had been sent to the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay. But top administration officials said the jail program would stay open.

EU member Poland and candidate country Romania, accused of hosting secret CIA detention centers by an investigator for Europe's chief human rights watchdog, the Council of Europe, issued fresh denials, but EU lawmakers were not satisfied.


"The location of these prison camps must be made public," said German lawmaker Wolfgang Kreissl-Doerfler, a member of a European Parliament committee investigating the allegations.

"We need to know if there has been any complicity in illegal acts," he added.

Warsaw said the Polish president Lech Kaczynski had no knowledge of detention centers in Poland at this stage.
.
http://today.reuters.com/news/artic...rc=090706_1623_TOPSTORY_trial_plan_challenged

Eh?
 
#18
Awol said:
The whole idea of taking suspects out of the US was to remain within the law. It enabled the men in suits to do things legally in those countries that they couldn't do in the States. Despite squeals from liberals, the US acted legally. It's unpleasant certainly, but so was 9/11.

If the CIA were able to just extract informaton totally regardless of human rights, the suspects would be fish food off Miami right now, having lost much of their minds and most of their genitals.
And what a sore loss to humanity that would be. :roll:
 
#19
The only thing that seperates us from the people we are fighting is that we are not prepared to lower ourselves to their level.

It would be all too easy to subdue the insurgency in Iraq by carrying out Saddam type atrocities, to carry out tit for tat murders - we'll see Your tube bombings and raise You a village in Syria, a soldier dies in Afghanistan and we take out 10 men, line them up against a wall and shoot them.

To take prisoners to a country where torture is allowed, because it isn't allowed in the country of ones birth is disgusting. When the american soldiers were kidnapped, tortured and killed, what made that act of torture wrong. Why were those acts inhuman and yet the handing over of Al Queda suspects humane. Just because the torture isn't as bad as the torture the other side uses does not make it acceptable.

I actually thought that the US was above that sort of thing, it fuck1ng stinks
 
#20
Sven said:
To take prisoners to a country where torture is allowed, because it isn't allowed in the country of ones birth is disgusting.
No, this is disgusting:



The rest is prevention.

And payback.

Payback is a motherfcuker, or hadn't you heard?

By the bye--just wait until someone *really* manages to tee us off. My, won't you be disapproving then.
 

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