Burqas Banned in france!

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
I was wondering if they had the nuts to do it - and they do. Good on them, and they've based it on unfair sex discrimination!!!!
 
#5
Not quite banned though is it?

"He backed a cross-party initiative by some 60 legislators for a parliamentary commission to find ways to stop the burqa's spread."
 
#6
whatnow? said:
FRENCH BAN BURQAS

This will ruffle some feathers :twisted:
Yes I agree 8O

A PM with a Backbone, i hope Mr Brown & Co pay attention to this but i doubt it

I see the cabinet are divided on the issue, and i also think it will take time to push through any proposed legislation that the French wants

I also see the critics are having a field day with this issue already

This will be interesting to see how this develops & I wonder if any other Country's will follow suit, but i doubt it
 
#7
Why should they be banned. If they're banned how long before beards are banned. Then lets go the whole hog and ban anyone from being different.

I think white trousers and a white t-shirt would be a good start for our future state where everyone is the same :roll:

People winge about extremists wanting to change our culture but then insist other people change theirs. Let them wear whatever they want. I couldn't care less.
 
#8
I hope that the u.k. takes the same approach The principle behind the BURQAS is that it is clothing that maintains personal modesty, But i personally think the BURQAS is a security risk and you cant see the person who is wearing it .
If a lady so wishes to wear a hi jab for"head cover and modest dress among Muslims for her faith then this is a much more acceptable .
 
#9
When the French banned Burqas from schools there was a bit of a fuss then on the first day of the new term they just removed the headwear before entering school and put it on again when they left.The leader of the muslim community told his followers that they should obey the laws of the land that they live in. Can't we get him to live in the UK,he talked a lot of sense.

The first few days after the London Bombings the French kicked out approx 15 'Preachers of Hate'. We have only kicked out one and one did a runner to the Lebanon.The French are much quicker off the mark than we are,when it comes to protecting their own.
 
#10
stumble said:
I hope that the u.k. takes the same approach The principle behind the BURQAS is that it is clothing that maintains personal modesty, But i personally think the BURQAS is a security risk and you cant see the person who is wearing it .
If a lady so wishes to wear a hi jab for"head cover and modest dress among Muslims for her faith then this is a much more acceptable .
Behave yourself.

Are we going to ban every other item of clothing that covers or partly covers the face.

We live in a country that has a knee jerk reaction when a bobby wants to search them under terrorism legislation but then is quite happy to suggest that someone adhering to their religious code is a "Security Risk."

I think we should ban any clothing which is not skin tight as someone could hide something underneath :roll:
 
#11
stumble said:
I hope that the u.k. takes the same approach The principle behind the BURQAS is that it is clothing that maintains personal modesty, But i personally think the BURQAS is a security risk and you cant see the person who is wearing it .
If a lady so wishes to wear a hi jab for"head cover and modest dress among Muslims for her faith then this is a much more acceptable .
I smell Chubb.
 
#12
Good, get it done here too. When the Arabic girlie mate remarks she's seen more Burkas per square foot in the Brumopolis than Damascus, we have a problem.

And it is a problem, it's being used as a symbol of resistance according to some established Muslims hereabouts, and there is certainly resentment within the community to the proliferation of this form of dress, which is seen as shoving women's rights backwards.

If it really was so desired by Muslim females, an argument oft-repeated, why are there so many burkas heading into the female toilets in the BullRing centre and so many hip and trendy western dressed Asian females emerging?
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
The Iranians, as a whole, manage to protect their modesty with head-scarves that do not cover their faces, yet they are still, as a whole very devout Shia Muslims.

The Bhurka is something that has been foisted upon women by men, using religion as an excuse. It's based around the idea that women are not supposed to be beautiful, or, once owned, they must hide that beauty away, except for their husbands and family at home. If this was a fair hypothesis and regime, the blokes would be doing it too, lest other women got 'lusty' at the sight of them.

We in Europe have secular societies that promote, quite rightly, equality of the sexes, and the Bhurka, and the religion, culture behind it is used as an excuse for continued oppression. We have evolved facial muscles over millions of years that enable us to communicate, not merely by voice, but to express emotion, and more importantly, intent to other people around us. The bhurka denies 50% of these communities that ability and right.

If you DO give women the choice, the vast majority will choose NOT to wear the bhurka, as demonstrated by hundreds of millions of muslim women around the world. It is only within the most backward and insecure communities and countries where this continues.

The French are right.
 
#14
PartTimePongo said:
Good, get it done here too. When the Arabic girlie mate remarks she's seen more Burkas per square foot in the Brumopolis than Damascus, we have a problem.

And it is a problem, it's being used as a symbol of resistance according to some established Muslims hereabouts, and there is certainly resentment within the community to the proliferation of this form of dress, which is seen as shoving women's rights backwards.

If it really was so desired by Muslim females, an argument oft-repeated, why are there so many burkas heading into the female toilets in the BullRing centre and so many hip and trendy western dressed Asian females emerging?
Fair enough - However what if you are just a quiet Muslim family happily paying your taxes and minding your own business happy in the knowledge that you are following your religious teachings. Should we take away that right as if we do I think we'd be better off living under a dictatorship.

Just because some are getting shut of the burqa doesn't mean they all are, nor do they all want to.

There maybe some learned arrsers posting on the subject but this kind of thing is just news to get the mouth breathers foaming from their cake holes and starting their next sentence with "I'm not racist but..."
 
#15
Closet_Jibber said:
Why should they be banned. If they're banned how long before beards are banned. Then lets go the whole hog and ban anyone from being different.
...
I'd have started with Beards.

Bint in a bag I can take though I still find Nuns distressing.

Feck!!!
 
#16
I think, (I'm sure Cloggie will put me right), but the Dutch have a similar tough view on this.

In a terror alert, they can invoke a law, that bans people in public places covering their face, ie Burquas, motorbike helmets, balaclava's etc, seems sensible?
 
#17
Burqas are NOT compulsory attire for Muslim women. When the UK had its major influx of Arabs in the 60s, nearly none of them wore burqas, as they wanted to integrate and its no more compulsory than a Christian wearing a crucifix. Their children and grandchildren wear them these days as they dislike the west, and are reluctant to intergrate (as a general rule, there are of course exceptions) so fair enough. Aside from thinking it funny how preventing someone from wearing something is good for their freedoms, I think the French have it right, if your in a country (even if it is France) respect their culture and don't do things to offend them (unless of course it France). This may be a positive step, especially as suicide bombers in Paris are a comfortable distance away. I wouldn't have thought that Brown will have any inclination (or authority) to follow suit though.
 
#18
Tubbyboy said:
stumble said:
I hope that the u.k. takes the same approach The principle behind the BURQAS is that it is clothing that maintains personal modesty, But i personally think the BURQAS is a security risk and you cant see the person who is wearing it .
If a lady so wishes to wear a hi jab for"head cover and modest dress among Muslims for her faith then this is a much more acceptable .
I smell Chubb.
Smell it - it's practically rancid.

Can see your point PTP re Brum, but the Imans are likely to have the most influence locally. Can't comment on Brum, but in my part of the world, communication between other faith groups and the local mosque are non existant - which truly is a pity, as the local Iman is moderate, balanced and does not fit the stereotype that is commonly put forward.

The use of Hijab / Burka has been adopted by many Muslims around the world as a statement of their commitment to Islam and its teachings. It should come as little surprise that in the early 21st Century, that some feel more compelled to adopt Burka and others are under more pressure to adopt, as a sign of their bond with Islam.

Whether we agree or not, and if so under what grounds, it is an form of religous dress that has existed for centuries - the difference being, that with an increase (in some areas very large increase) of the Muslim population in the UK, that we now witness more women adopting Burkha as a dress style.

Personally, I consider that the "security" aspects of Burkha are overstated. Just my opinion though, and whilst many are happy to start the bus up, I would guess that many of those who would post here, rely on the red top stories for their knowledge of Islam. Stumble's post is a good example.

Stumble have you spoken to many Muslim women to understand the issues around the adoption of Burkha, and why more feel compelled to adopt it in this country?

The adoption of Burkha (ban it - as an established form of religous dress)?

By all means, but don't be surprised when many Muslims feel even more detached from the society they live in. If the issue is security, possibly we could research what percentage of criminal activity is carried out by women who adopt Burkha, versus say, crime carried out by males and females adopting hoodie, baseball cap and sunglasses?

Of course, if this is just a matter that people feel uncomfortable when they can't see somebody's face, that's a whole different matter.
 
#19
ABrighter2006 said:
Tubbyboy said:
stumble said:
I hope that the u.k. takes the same approach The principle behind the BURQAS is that it is clothing that maintains personal modesty, But i personally think the BURQAS is a security risk and you cant see the person who is wearing it .
If a lady so wishes to wear a hi jab for"head cover and modest dress among Muslims for her faith then this is a much more acceptable .
I smell Chubb.
Smell it - it's practically rancid.

Can see your point PTP re Brum, but the Imans are likely to have the most influence locally. Can't comment on Brum, but in my part of the world, communication between other faith groups and the local mosque are non existant - which truly is a pity, as the local Iman is moderate, balanced and does not fit the stereotype that is commonly put forward.

The use of Hijab / Burka has been adopted by many Muslims around the world as a statement of their commitment to Islam and its teachings. It should come as little surprise that in the early 21st Century, that some feel more compelled to adopt Burka and others are under more pressure to adopt, as a sign of their bond with Islam.

Whether we agree or not, and if so under what grounds, it is an form of religous dress that has existed for centuries - the difference being, that with an increase (in some areas very large increase) of the Muslim population in the UK, that we now witness more women adopting Burkha as a dress style.

Personally, I consider that the "security" aspects of Burkha are overstated. Just my opinion though, and whilst many are happy to start the bus up, I would guess that many of those who would post here, rely on the red top stories for their knowledge of Islam. Stumble's post is a good example.

Stumble have you spoken to many Muslim women to understand the issues around the adoption of Burkha, and why more feel compelled to adopt it in this country?

The adoption of Burkha (ban it - as an established form of religous dress)?

By all means, but don't be surprised when many Muslims feel even more detached from the society they live in. If the issue is security, possibly we could research what percentage of criminal activity is carried out by women who adopt Burkha, versus say, crime carried out by males and females adopting hoodie, baseball cap and sunglasses?

Of course, if this is just a matter that people feel uncomfortable when they can't see somebody's face, that's a whole different matter.
But it's not just Brum, & i disagree with critics that the word "security" is overstated, you decide to live in the UK you accept the laws & cultures of the country you decide to reside in :roll:

I understand that a lot will jump on the band wagon & exploit issues, mainly because of the state of the country & the P.c. World culture thats gone barmy,

Prevention is better than cure, as it might be too late by then, but we've seen what past events have caused & a Government which acts too little too late yet again :evil:
 
#20
Why are we only thinking about this now. As people have been dressing like this for years but it only really became a problem in 2001 for most people.

Is it because propaganda press and knee jerk government reactions to dealing with certain countries have led some to believe that Islam is something to be linked with security issues and terrorism?

I'd say the religion is not something directly linked. I would however suggest that there are plenty of idiots out there willing to suggest that religion is a good enough excuse to commit acts of terrorism. These people are societies fcuk wits and its nice to know that they are being removed from the circle of life early.
 

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