Burma move their capital city for no apparent reason

#1
Burma's decision to shift its seat of government has left many analysts at a loss to explain the move.

After all, why go to the huge trouble and expense of relocating thousands of officials to a remote mountainous region, when there is a well-established political infrastructure in the port city of Rangoon?

Information Minister Kyaw Hsan said the site of the new capital, near the town of Pyinmana, was a more strategic location for Burma's military rulers.

"It is centrally located, and has quick access to all parts of the country," he told reporters on Monday.

But analysts outside the country were unconvinced.

They said the real reason was probably still a mystery, but it was possible the country's hard-line military rulers were worried about foreign invasion, or wanted more control over ethnic minorities in the border regions, or were even following the advice of fortune tellers.

"I'm Burmese, and sometimes even I don't understand what the government is thinking," said Aung Zaw, the editor of Irrawaddy, a publication run by Burmese journalists in exile.

Joseph Silverstein, a Burma specialist and Emeritus Professor of Rutgers University, described the plan as "totally irrational".

Fear of attack

The military junta's liking for secrecy, coupled with its suspicion of the outside world, has led many people to speculate that the move is due to some generals' fear of being attacked by the United States.

According to Aung Kin, a Burmese historian based in London, the country's army is much stronger than its navy.

It is "more comfortable defending a land perimeter" such as Pyinmana than a coastal city such as Rangoon, he said.

But according to Christian Lemiere, Asia editor of Jane's Country Risk, any potential enemy is much more likely to attack by air than by sea - and therefore moving location will make little difference.

In fact, if anything, a smaller centre of government will be easier to target from the air, Mr Lemiere said.

All this is of course assuming someone is actually planning to attack Burma in the first place - a move which analysts agree is extremely unlikely.

It is true that Burma's poor human rights record has done little to ingratiate its senior generals to the international community. But analysts say there has been no suggestion of a foreign attack.

"Rumours of an American invasion are just a joke - but the military is extremely paranoid," said Aung Zaw.

'Rat hole'

Diplomats have speculated that another possible reason for the move to Pyinmana is that its central location will make the government better able to monitor the lawless border regions of the ethnic Shan, Chin and Karen states.

Aung Zaw said that to a certain extent this may be true, but he doubted it would make much difference in terms of military control.

Saw Sarki, from the Karen National Union (KNU), agreed.

"The army is quite decentralised anyway, and it is spread throughout Burma already," he said.

Others say the move may simply be about the government's need to increase its own security.

"Pyinmana is much less populated, so it can build a fortress from scratch," said Saw Sarki.

Reports from inside Burma talk of a maze of underground tunnels being built, and Aung Zaw described the new location as the government's "rat hole".

The isolated new site will also provide the authorities with increased secrecy from the outside world.

Many ministries - including the foreign ministry - are in the process of moving to Pyinmana. But foreign and UN embassies have been told there are currently no plans for them to follow.

"If you need to communicate on urgent matters, you can send a fax to Pyinmana," the foreign ministry said in its statement on Monday.

A British diplomat told the BBC that she could not predict what impact the move would have on relations with embassies and the government.

But analysts say it will almost certainly make contact with the Burmese leadership - already one of the world's most secretive governments - even more difficult.

Joseph Silverstein believes the most likely explanation for the relocation is advice by traditional Burmese fortune-tellers.

"Everybody listens to fortune-tellers in Burma," he said.

General Ne Win, who came to power in 1962, was totally dependent on their advice, Mr Silverstein added.

"He is once said to have decided to change the direction of traffic overnight [as a result of a fortune teller]. It caused a huge number of accidents," he said.

BBC
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#2
George Orwell described the Burmese as <<The Irish of the Orient>>....er...thus pi77ing off both groups in one fell swoop... :)

A few years ago, when I had to do with Burma, the country's rulers arbitrarily changed the currency overnight - thus wiping out thousands of peasants life savings at a stroke.....the pro democracy movement headed by Aung San's daughter ( the one who's been under house arrest in Rangoon for twenty years) launched a major anti government campaign on the 8th of August 1988 - because the number '8' is thought to be lucky in Burma...perplexing people .....occupying a country the size of France, awash with mineral wealth and natural resources , beauty and culture that would make it a tourist Mecca - and run by a paranoid military junta....if ever there was country crying out for the Pax Americana it is Burma.....(whispers) they even have OIL..........
 
#3
My guess is that the head boys' wife is behind it. "No dear, I think it would look better over there just under the curtains, no along a bit more. Yes, right there."
 

SCoy

War Hero
#4
Apparently the new city's one big f*ck off fortress. Like it has only one entrance and is surrounded by AT stuff..
 
#5
SCoy said:
Apparently the new city's one big f*ck off fortress. Like it has only one entrance and is surrounded by AT stuff..

One entrance is the same a one way out.

A few questions

Will that AT stuff be much good against USAF fast air?

Is the fortress cruise missile proof?

If the oil rumour prove to be true and worth the effort can I start packing for Op Burma freedom 06?
 
#6
Quote
were even following the advice of fortune tellers.
Joseph Silverstein believes the most likely explanation for the relocation is advice by traditional Burmese fortune-tellers.

"Everybody listens to fortune-tellers in Burma," he said.

General Ne Win, who came to power in 1962, was totally dependent on their advice, Mr Silverstein added.

"He is once said to have decided to change the direction of traffic overnight [as a result of a fortune teller]. It caused a huge number of accidents," he said.
End of Quote

Not good to take selective lines out of a post but, local opionin is that so much of the above is how life is run in Burma. The government policy comes from the advice of witchdoctors.
China is their big buddy and yes OIL is the name of the game.
The Frog has Petrochemical investments and that so much of it was built by SLAVE LABOUR is convieantly swept aside.
Irrawadei Magazine is published just around the corrner from my watering hole.
john
 
#7
Goatman said:
George Orwell described the Burmese as <<The Irish of the Orient>>....er...thus pi77ing off both groups in one fell swoop... :)

A few years ago, when I had to do with Burma, the country's rulers arbitrarily changed the currency overnight - thus wiping out thousands of peasants life savings at a stroke.....the pro democracy movement headed by Aung San's daughter ( the one who's been under house arrest in Rangoon for twenty years) launched a major anti government campaign on the 8th of August 1988 - because the number '8' is thought to be lucky in Burma...perplexing people .....occupying a country the size of France, awash with mineral wealth and natural resources , beauty and culture that would make it a tourist Mecca - and run by a paranoid military junta....if ever there was country crying out for the Pax Americana it is Burma.....(whispers) they even have OIL..........
Oil? Oil, you say? Hold on a few, I have a few phone calls to make... :D
 
#8
Tuesday, January 31, 2006
Builders Under Pressure to Complete Pyinmana Parade Ground
By The Irrawaddy
January 30, 2006
Burmese government engineers and private contractors are reportedly under pressure to complete work on a military parade ground in Pyinmana, the country’s new administrative capital, before the next Armed Forces Day, in late March.
Local sources and engineers working on the project told The Irrawaddy that the parade ground will be the size of three or four football pitches. One unconfirmed report said the parade ground project will cost the equivalent of about US $9 million.
Armed Forces Day has traditionally been marked by a grand military parade in Rangoon. Last year, the 60th anniversary of Armed Forces Day, more than 7,000 military personnel took part in the parade, through Rangoon’s Resistance Park.
The parades are usually attended by Burma’s ruling military junta, including supremo Snr-Gen Than Shwe, who is rumored to be demanding that this year’s event, the 61st anniversary, be held in Pyinmana.
The order to move government ministries from Rangoon to Pyinmana, 320 km to the north, came last November, and since December hundreds of trucks and cement-mixers have arrived in Pyinmana to work on the parade ground.
The pressure is also on to finish work on Snr-Gen Than Shwe’s new home on a hilltop site in Pyinmana. The huge house, with a floor
space of about 4,000 sqm, is said to be almost complete.

john
 
#9
At least if its that isolated when we do the decent thing and lend lease the karen a tac nuke not too much colateral :lol: . And we get to negotiate a good deal on oil minerals etc :) .
It will piss of french asians etc and the spams (as we win once again in asia :) ) and we repay a debt long overdue.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
Greengrass said:
SCoy said:
Apparently the new city's one big f*ck off fortress. Like it has only one entrance and is surrounded by AT stuff..
If the oil rumour prove to be true and worth the effort can I start packing for Op Burma freedom 06?
Rumour?

Ever heard of Denis Thatcher ? Used to be married to one Margaret Thatcher, late spinster of Grantham ?

Our former PM's hubby was Chairman of a small concern called Burmah Oil - which later became BP.

When the Japanese invaded Burma in 1941 one of the key things that DIDN'T happen was the destruction of the oil refining capability - which is EXACTLY what the Nips were being starved of (in their view).

Little bit of history -

In 1901 William Knox D'Arcy obtained a concession to explore for oil in Iran. From 1905 this work was financed by The Burmah Oil Company Ltd and oil was discovered in 1908. The Anglo-Persian Oil Company Ltd was incorporated on 14 April 1909 and took over ownership of the concession, but was still a subsidiary of Burmah. This changed in 1914 following the British Government's decision to convert its Navy to fuel oil, as it lead to a large investment in the Company by the Government giving it a 66 per cent interest. The Government remained a major shareholder in the Company until it decided to sell most of its shares on the stock exchange in 1987.

In 1923 the Company discovered oil in Iraq, within the "Transferred Territories" which fell within the D'Arcy Concession. In 1914 it had become a shareholder in the Turkish Petroleum Company Ltd, later renamed the Iraq Petroleum Company Ltd, which struck oil in Iraq in 1927. In 1934 the Kuwait Oil Company Ltd was incorporated as a jointly-owned venture with Gulf Oil Corporation of Pennsylvania, which discovered oil in Kuwait in 1938. In 1932 the Company formed a joint UK marketing company with Shell called Shell-Mex and B.P. Ltd.

The Company was renamed the Anglo-Persian Oil Company Ltd in 1935. In 1951 the Iranian Oil industry was nationalised and the Company was expelled from Iran. It changed its name in 1954 to The British Petroleum Company Ltd. A consortium called The Iranian Oil Participants Ltd was then formed, in which the Company had the largest interest. The purpose of the Consortium was to work with the National Iranian Oil Company (formed in 1951) to develop the country's oil and gas interests. This lasted until the Islamic Revolution in 1979.

During the 1960s and 70s the Company pioneered oil and gas exploration and production in the North Sea and Alaska. This was followed in the 1970s and 80s by a programme of diversification which included the creation of BP Minerals, BP Coal, and BP Nutrition. However, most of these assets were sold between 1987 and 1994 in order to finance the purchases of The Standard Oil Company in May 1987 and Britoil in March 1988. The Company then underwent a process of concentration on the "core businesses" of exploration, marketing and refining, and petrochemicals. The one significant survivor from the years of diversification is BP Solar which continued to grow during the 1990s and is now one of the world's largest solar energy companies.

In 1982 the Company changed its name to The British Petroleum Co p.l.c. On 31 December 1998, the Company merged with the US oil company, Amoco Corporation, on a 60/40 basis and was renamed BP Amoco p.l.c. Two further takeovers occurred in 2000 - Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) and Burmah Castrol p.l.c. On 1 May 2001 the Company was renamed BP p.l.c.

Reference: BP Archive
and
Archive
The Burmah Oil Company Ltd was incorporated in 1886 to develop the Burmese Oilfields, which it left in 1963, when it undertook new exploration elsewhere. As a result of investing in exploration in Iran, it owned 23 per cent of British Petroleum until the 1970s. Rationalisation followed the oil crisis of 1974 and exploration was abandoned in 1986 to focus on lubricants. Castrol was established in 1899 as C C Wakefield & Company Ltd, selling lubricants to a variety of industries. It became a public limited company in 1943 and was renamed Castrol Ltd in 1960. It was acquired by Burmah Oil in 1966. In 2000 Burmah Castrol was acquired by BP Amoco.
Oh and since oil is so old hat these days - 'cos Natural gas is the big thing everybody wants a piece of it seems - then you should tell that nice Mister Rumsfeld that Burma has been exploring (partnered with a FRENCH state petrochemical company) the ENORMOUS gas reserves in its offshore Gulf of Martaban field since the early 90s......


If you work at Asprey's or Garrard's - a Burmese General is QUITE a find....... 8)


Le Chevre
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
woody said:
At least if its that isolated when we do the decent thing and lend lease the karen a tac nuke not too much colateral :lol: . And we get to negotiate a good deal on oil minerals etc :) .
It will urine of french asians etc and the spams (as we win once again in asia :) ) and we repay a debt long overdue.
Concur....the Karen were the ONLY locals to stand by British Forces during the Japanese invasion, the Long Retreat into India and the subsequent brutal occupation of Burma.

Karen troops fought loyally with retreating British forces and were a mainstay of resistance to the occupation. They also assisted Force 136 in country
(cf www.burmastar.org.uk/hayton.htmForce 136 )

Since 1962, the Karen (and Kachin, Shan and Mon peoples to a lesser extent) have fought the Burmese central government from a steadily shrinking enclave on the Thai border. The Thai government colluded with Burmese forces recently in an effort to eradicate the remaining Karen camps.

The Karen, unlike their Shan and Kachin colleagues, are largely Christians - the legacy of Baptist and Methodist missionaries.

The attached gives a bit more on the involvement of the French (state) petrochemical company...source is an anti -junta website so pinch of salt may be required:
http://www.burmacampaign.org.uk/total_briefing.html

TOTAL’s Destructive Engagement
TOTAL’s presence in Burma has consequences far beyond its 63-kilometre pipeline across Burmese territory. Its destructive influence goes to the heart of international policy towards one of the world’s most brutal regimes. For that reason, it is essential for all those who want change in Burma to deal with the problem of TOTAL Oil. Here are some of the destructive consequences of TOTAL’s ‘engagement’ in Burma:

French foreign policy:
One of the most significant consequences of TOTAL’s presence in Burma is its influence on French foreign policy. In order to protect TOTAL’s interests, the French government has become an obstacle to any serious strengthening of EU measures against Burma – particularly with regard to economic sanctions.

The government of France has pushed for the Burmese junta to be admitted into international associations (such as the Asia Europe Meeting or Asem); defended TOTAL’s investment in Burma; and ensured that EU policy is devoid of any serious sanction against Burma’s dictators. In October 2004 France made sure that proposed new sanctions against Burma would not affect the regime’s most lucrative sector – oil and gas. France, by protecting TOTAL’s interest in Burma, is protecting the dictatorship itself.

Financing dictatorship:

TOTAL’s project provides significant annual revenue to the regime. Some sources estimate as much as $450million. Natural gas is now Burma's largest single source of export revenue, accounting for around 30% of export earnings in 2002/03. TOTAL’s investment in Burma has helped the regime to build its military capacity, in particular the acquisition of Russian MIG fighter planes. Jane's Defence Weekly reported in July 2001. that Rangoon was buying 10 MiG-29 jet fighters from the Russian Aircraft-building Corporation for US$130 million and that the money was coming from Thai gas purchases. The down-payment for the MIGs (30 percent of the total) came in the same week that the state-owned Petroleum Authority of Thailand paid Burma US$100 million in royalties, for gas due to be piped ashore from fields in the Gulf of Martaban. Before the Thais made this payment under the terms of its 1995 contract, Burma had almost depleted its foreign exchange reserves. According to Robert Karniol, Asia editor of Jane's Defence Weekly, the Russians had been unwilling to sell aircraft to Burma until revenue began to flow from the Martaban gas field.
( Where's feckin' Max Hastings now then ? )

Le Chevre

<< En avant - a bas les financiers ! >>
 
#13
jonwilly said:
Tuesday, January 31, 2006
Builders Under Pressure to Complete Pyinmana Parade Ground
By The Irrawaddy
January 30, 2006
Burmese government engineers and private contractors are reportedly under pressure to complete work on a military parade ground in Pyinmana, the country’s new administrative capital, before the next Armed Forces Day, in late March.
Local sources and engineers working on the project told The Irrawaddy that the parade ground will be the size of three or four football pitches. One unconfirmed report said the parade ground project will cost the equivalent of about US $9 million.
Armed Forces Day has traditionally been marked by a grand military parade in Rangoon. Last year, the 60th anniversary of Armed Forces Day, more than 7,000 military personnel took part in the parade, through Rangoon’s Resistance Park.
The parades are usually attended by Burma’s ruling military junta, including supremo Snr-Gen Than Shwe, who is rumored to be demanding that this year’s event, the 61st anniversary, be held in Pyinmana.
The order to move government ministries from Rangoon to Pyinmana, 320 km to the north, came last November, and since December hundreds of trucks and cement-mixers have arrived in Pyinmana to work on the parade ground.
The pressure is also on to finish work on Snr-Gen Than Shwe’s new home on a hilltop site in Pyinmana. The huge house, with a floor
space of about 4,000 sqm, is said to be almost complete.

john
Can we use the same methods to get Wembly done on time? I just hope they aren't using the same roofing contractors that got blasted in yesterday's Times.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#14
g4orce said:
Can we use the same methods to get Wembly done on time? I just hope they aren't using the same roofing contractors that got blasted in yesterday's Times.
Umm...can you imagine the Bliar govt INVITING 7,000 members of the Armed Forces to London.......don't think so ! :lol:
 
#15
Maybe the Burmese used the same Witchdoktors that counselled the German Government to move from homely Bonn to Mega-expensive Berlin for Billions,built of course by cheap Polish labour. :lol:

P.S.Please don´t use their example of near-slavelabour to build your new home,you´ll go too jail. :cry:
 
#16
The Oil Fields.
I have sent e -mail to our 86 year old Major late RE who was in Burma at this time to ask the opinion of some one who was there-ish.
The only refereance book I have is Louis Allen's, Burma "The Longest War 1941-45".
According to Allen the Oilfields at YENANGYAUNG where totally destroyed.
There are still War Lords with their own Armies on the Thai- Burmese border and one was fetured the other day in Chiang Mai's local newspaper. I cannot remember if thy where Karen or one of the Drug Lords troops. Seemed well disciplind and armed from photos and where getting ready for this years combat against Burmese Government troops.
They tend to hold mountain top positions backing on to Thailand. The Burmese try to out flank by entring Thai territory and so Thai forces get involved. Usually the Boarder Patrol Police who despite their Police "ownership' are equiped as a Light Infantery Battalions and are considered Crack troops. They have the look of well trained and equiped men when you pass them near the border, the main road goes within a kilometer of border in places.
john
Reply to e mail 4 hours forward
"You are right and your correspondent is quite wrong. I have found three passages that you could quote from Official History and also books by Maj Gen Lyall Grant and James Lunt (who were both there!). I will add my own comments re Yenangyaung. Extensive demolitions were made of all oil installations. They even flew a Shell Co Ltd employee from Cairo to prepare the scheme and it was carried out by a combined civilian and military team numbering 26 in all.
 
#17
I have had a longer post from my 86 year old friend and have a request away to publish his in depth reply on Burma Oil Fields 1942.
The Private Army I mentioned is the SSUA, Shan States United Army claimed to be 10,000 strong. They state in this PC era, not to employ troops under 18 years old.
They where formed from the old Drug/Warlord's Army of Khun San, who a couple of Thai divisions chased out of Northern Thailand a few years ago, at DEA insistance.
john
 
#18
Reply to John Williams from Major Roy Hudson RE retired
John:
You are quite right, ALL the oil installations in Burma were extensively destroyed in the 1942 Retreat. There were complete plans made long beforehand for a team of civilians and sappers to carry out the plans, which started with installations in Rangoon and worked up to Yenangyaung and another oilfield further north. Here are passages you could quote, my own comments follow on afterwards.

Official History of the Indian Army Forces in the Second World War - Vol 1:
Rangoon: 'The demolition scheme (for Rangoon) had been drawn up long before and rehearsals were carried out. As for oil denials, as early as December 1941, a scheme was started for the complete destruction of the three refineries at Syriam, Seikkyi and Thilawa. It was later revised to a scheme of maximum denial in the time available. For this purpose, Mr W. L. Forster (Production Manager of Shell Mex Ltd) was flown to Burma from Cairo and he laid down the following policy: 'All tanks and stocks, pumps and plants which could not be evacuated would be destroyed. Personnel were also to be evacuated'. The preparation for demolitions were made by one section of the Burma Sappers and Miners. The actual demolitions were carried our by three European Engineers (RE? -RH) officers, eleven Royal Marines, fifteen sappers (Burma S&M) and three members of the Burma Oil Company's staff and one Burma Officer. Some denial work was started before 7 March. This included all oil storage tanks, machine shops, oxygen plants, electric plants, drum and tin plants. The pipe-line river crossing was effectively plugged with cement'. [The plan WAS carried out, plenty of accounts of witmesses are available. - RH]

Yenangyaung

'Orders for the destruction of the Yenangyaung oilfields were issued by Lt-General Alexander [delegated to Lt-Gen Slim - RH] on the night of 14 April. The necessary demolitions were extensive, requiring fortyeight hours for completion. They ended with the destruction of the power house, which was carried out when the Japanese were on the northern outskirts of Yenangyaung and when the 1st Burma Division was still several mules south of that place'. (Note: General Alexander's /Despatch/, para 32).

Extracts from: Burma 1942 The Japanese Invasion by Ian Lyall Grant and Kazuo Tamayama -
The Disaster at Temamgyaung; 'On his way he [General Slim] he visited the oilfields where the complex work for the demolitions had been completed. Mr Forster, the oil engineer who had organized the destruction of the refineries at Rangoon, was in charge, assisted again by Captain Scott RE. Slim, who had been authorised by General Alexander to use his discretion about the timing, now decided that the demolitions must start. The power station, however. the largest in Burma, was to be kept in operation for as long as possible as it also supplied electricity to the oilfield in Chauk, 20 miles further north'. [It was demolished 36 hours later. RH]

Extract from "Hell of a Licking - The Retreat from Burma 1941-42 - by James Lunt
[I knew Lunt. He was a Staff captain in 2nd Burma Brigade]
'He [Lt-General Slim] had already at 1300 hrs on 15 April, issued the order for demolition of the Yenangyaung oilfield complex, apart from the power station that was required for pumping water from the river [Irrawaddi]. The demolitions were in the capable hands of Mr W.L. Forster who had already sent the Syriam installations at Rangoon sky-high. All preparations had been completed as early as 9 April, the day General Sakurai sent his 33rd Division on their way to Allanmyo, and by 1400 hours on 15 April, their melancholy task was completed, Mr Forster and party were on their way up-river...leaving behind them a scene of devastation which 2nd Burma Brigade, from across the river, could only describe as 'awe-inspiring''.
'The entire eastern horizon was blanketed by an enormous pall of thick, black smoke, through which the flames burst through. hundreds and hundreds of metres high. It was as if the whole of Yenangyaung was on fire, added to which was the dull thud of explosions as building after building was dynamited . General Sakurai might take Yenangyaung - but without its oil'.

Comment by Lt Roy Hudson RE:
My section of the Malerkotla S&M Field Company was south of Yenangyaung, supporting the long column of trucks, mules and marching soldiers by supplying water points at the side of the road on their north. This water was being sent down in 40-gallon drums by HQ and other sections of the company. After the large power generator was demolished the only water easily available was the water in the swimming pool.
1 Burdiv spent the night just south of the outskirts of the town. I had one 'lift-and-force' pump and my men spent the night filling unit water vehicles. Next day, with Japanese already occupying the town, the division followed a service track that bypassed the town. But it did not manage to reach its object (the Pin Chaung stream) and it had to spend the night in a very small circular area.
Next day my unit found itself in the front line and could see the Japanese troops moving about and changing the position of mortar guns. There was no sign of smoke by then. But there was no water either. Soon after midday, with everyone in a very poor state, the order was given to march on a certain compass course. To cut a long story short, we had to abandon all our transpost, equipment and belongings. With luck we reached the Pin Chaung, many in a delirious state - and fell lengthwise into the water. When we had recovered sufficiently, we climbed the bank of the chaung and were re-united with the remainder of our unit.

I did not see any sign of demolitions. We were amongst oil derricks, none of them in action. The installations that had been demolished were elsewhere. RH

I forgot to say that in 1972, when I visited Burma, there was still severe rationing of petrol.

End of quote.
john
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#19
Jon

comprehensively rebutted....listen out for the rhythmic clashing of my forehead on the parquet and the low drone of "we are not worthy...we are not worthy"..... :lol:

Of the references cited ( let alone the crisp memories of someone who was actually there ! ) I have only read the James Lunt book - which I can heartily recommend to any British soldier who thinks air superiority is a given.

My memory was at fault.....doubtless the Major's actual words were - " Not destroyed? poppycock! "

Sir, if I ever get to Chiang Mai (or better still, Rangoon) I hope I will have the honour of setting up a CRATE of Singha for yourself and the Major!

( or do you favour the Singapore-brewed San Mig !!)

G'Man
 
#20
He's a luvverly Bloke, 86 running on 19. Always ready to defend the Oner of his old 'Regtiment' and will be a Sapper to the end.
He was heavily involved in the 'Matter' of the destruction of the Sittang Bridge, one of the major incedents of the early weeks of the jap invasion. His views on the bisness which he has given me a written copy of, are most illuminating. 2 Infantry Brigades from 17 Indian Div where on the fighting side when the Local commander detonated the bridge.
He will personally go over and meet any new commers in his local and will them welcome them, typical Gent of his era.
On one occasion a very well dressed Young Thai Lady entred sat down at bar and ordered a drink. The regulars, myself included where all passing Boys comments to each other, he was over formally introduced himself and chatted her up. Mind you he was a mear pup of 84 at the time. (Turned out she had Very High connections) VERY.
john
Luv ta see ya.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top