Bum deal for the National Guard

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Interesting.

I think from reading that, there appears to be a difference in how the septics do it in comparison to us Brits.

When a Brit reservist, TA member goes 'active', he joins his parent unit alongside his regular counterparts. He very quickly gets up to speed.

It sounds like the septics kep the reservists away from the experience that is on offer from the regs, which is unfortunate.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#3
Hardly breaking news this

Posted 12/13/2004 12:32 AM
Timeline of the article. Mayhaps there have been changes - any up to date info?
 
#4
The deployment of guard units to Iraq, on a scale never seen even in the Vietnam war, has driven the cost of the war deep into middle America. In 2005, guard forces were at one point more than half the combat forces in Iraq (a percentage never reached in the far greater guard mobilisations of both world wars). And while National Guard and reserve deaths were a quarter of all US fatalities since the war began, this year they increased: for August and September 2005 they were 56%.

http://www.opendemocracy.net/xml/xhtml/articles/2954.html
 
#5
#6
Biped said:
When a Brit reservist, TA member goes 'active', he joins his parent unit alongside his regular counterparts. He very quickly gets up to speed.
We don't have 'parent units' per se. Yes, some are round-out units, but more often than not, units are entirely independent: I'm currently in 81st Separate Brigade (Heavy), my old unit was in 40th Infantry Division. These are National Guard units, with National Guard generals in charge of NG division and brigade staffs and so on down the line. To keep the wheels ticking over, there are a number of full-time National Guard soldiers. As a result, in theory, when you deploy, you are deploying with a group of people you know, will care about you, and who are willing to be concerned about the 'real-world' problems that reservists who are mobilised have, a benefit which soldiers going as 'fillers' to other units do not.

The deployment of guard units to Iraq, on a scale never seen even in the Vietnam war, has driven the cost of the war deep into middle America. In 2005, guard forces were at one point more than half the combat forces in Iraq (a percentage never reached in the far greater guard mobilisations of both world wars).
I'm not sure about that. Four of the first five divisions sent to Europe in WWII were Guard, and I believe the first Army troops to see action (Philippines) were Guard as well. (40th ID again). Ultimately, of course, with the total mobilisation, the Guard numbers went down in proportion.

NTM
 
#7
I did think when I met the 2/127th that they had a big task, considering they were National Guard. Hats off to them they did a top job, and in 12 months only lost 3 guys!

Resepect guys, respect!!!!
 
#8
September 30th, 2005





NEW MILFORD, Pa. - Five Pennsylvania National Guard soldiers were killed in a roadside bombing west of Baghdad on Wednesday, pushing the state's death toll past 100, the military said Friday.

All five Guard members were residents of northeastern Pennsylvania and served in units of the 109th Infantry. Their deaths represent the largest loss of life from a single attack involving Pennsylvania soldiers in Iraq.





http://www.mfso.org/article.php?id=392
 
#10
Trip_Wire said:
As I recall, there were few if any Army National Guard or Reserve UNITS called up and sent to Vietnam. Many individual reservists volunteered for active duty and went to Vietnam. Reserve and Air National Guard units were called up and used.

http://www.ngb.army.mil/About/default.aspx

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3731/is_200210/ai_n9115109
"Few" actually I believe TW. I used to work with a guy whose "artillery" (actually 2.2" mortar) unit from I think the NJANG was mobilized. I've also heard of several loggie units and a 155mm artillery unit too.
 

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