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Bullet stopping gel

#5
fluffer said:
vvaannmmaann said:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/defence/4862103/Military-to-use-new-gel-that-stops-bullets.html
beeeen done!
Where?

I was thinking of something along these lines. I think it's called Newtonian motion? Where a liquid transforms to a solid when subject to shock. Something that can be pumped into vehicle armour and the like.
 
#7
If the bullet stops dead doesn't the object it hits then absorb the force so instead of being hit by a bullet it would be like being hit in the head with a sledgehammer?
 
#8
As the chap said, it's non-newtonian fluids (like honey) that exhibit this behaviour best. Fluids are classically incompressible, but solids distribute energy away from the site in a different way, and can exhibit deformation in the energy transfer. The Russians used to land their space capsules on land and take the bounce, as the initial hit was no where near as hard as the yanks splash down.
 
#9
apparentley this stuff is really good one time use obviosly, but if you knock it to hard it can harden enough for it not to work major down side there
 
#10
cam_up said:
apparentley this stuff is really good one time use obviosly, but if you knock it to hard it can harden enough for it not to work major down side there
Progressive layers of thickness then?

Thanks for the definition from the Geeks out there :D
 
#11
It's about distributing the impact over the largest possible area.

Imagine dropping a decent-sized book on your hand; no real dramas. Now imagine that the book is dropped on a pencil that is point down on your hand. That's going to hurt, as the pressure is much higher.

Ballistic cloth works in a similar way.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
If you stick a load of corn starch in water, and say, fill up a bath or swimming pool with it, you can run straight across the liquid without sinking, until you slow down or stand still, at which point you find yourself floating neck-deep in a fluid. You can have a person floating in the fluid and run right over them!
 
#13
Biped said:
If you stick a load of corn starch in water, and say, fill up a bath or swimming pool with it, you can run straight across the liquid without sinking, until you slow down or stand still, at which point you find yourself floating neck-deep in a fluid. You can have a person floating in the fluid and run right over them!
But that will really fcuk up the filtration system. :D
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
Saw the inventor demonstrating it on the news (don't know channel, don't know day... been a crap week). He had made knee pads out of the sutff and was dropping onto said knees on a concrete floor. Might be a minor application, but if say Osprey(mk.2?) was lined with this gel, then the percieved impact would be less, as would any injuries sustained. While not life threatening, a broken rib or even a deep muscle bruise can slow you down. And that MIGHT be life threatening.
 
#15
Biped said:
If you stick a load of corn starch in water, and say, fill up a bath or swimming pool with it, you can run straight across the liquid without sinking, until you slow down or stand still, at which point you find yourself floating neck-deep in a fluid. You can have a person floating in the fluid and run right over them!
I know a joke about that - involving a cross country runner, quicksand and blokes running past him :twisted:

Non-newtonian fluids of this type are dilatant and rely on a large surface area to absorb the shock. I wasn't aware the research had go this far as current personal systems are mainly blunt trauma types e.g knives.

Be interesting to see how it would react against teflon rounds, DU and HEAT ammunition.
 
#16
Trans-sane said:
Saw the inventor demonstrating it on the news (don't know channel, don't know day... been a crap week). He had made knee pads out of the sutff and was dropping onto said knees on a concrete floor. Might be a minor application, but if say Osprey(mk.2?) was lined with this gel, then the percieved impact would be less, as would any injuries sustained. While not life threatening, a broken rib or even a deep muscle bruise can slow you down. And that MIGHT be life threatening.
Is this him?
 
#17
Something like this in conjunction with soft body armour would reduce back-face trauma.

While HEAT and DU rounds have significant armour-defeating properties, teflon does not. It's a myth that has grown up based on hard armour-piercing rounds that are coated with teflon to prevent them damaging the barrel. The armour-defeat mechanism is a high hardness projectile core.
 
#18
incendiarycutlery said:
Something like this in conjunction with soft body armour would reduce back-face trauma.

While HEAT and DU rounds have significant armour-defeating properties, teflon does not. It's a myth that has grown up based on hard armour-piercing rounds that are coated with teflon to prevent them damaging the barrel. The armour-defeat mechanism is a high hardness projectile core.[/quote]

I agree but the original KTW round was brass. And I doubt that they were the very first as the Stasi were involved. Sorry I haven't got a link but the man who told me was Ernie (RIP) from the Pattern Rooms when they were at Enfield.

Back in the days when we made weapons :(
 
#19
Ah, I learn something new everyday. Against personal body armour like woven aramids, teflon does nothing, but your description of the round led me to a description which indicates that a teflon tip on a handgun bullet acts like an armour piercing cap found on dreadnought-era battleship shells and WW2 AP projectiles. This helps the round "bite" on hard, smooth surfaces like metal, especially at extreme angles.
 
#20
incendiarycutlery said:
Ah, I learn something new everyday. Against personal body armour like woven aramids, teflon does nothing, but your description of the round led me to a description which indicates that a teflon tip on a handgun bullet acts like an armour piercing cap found on dreadnought-era battleship shells and WW2 AP projectiles. This helps the round "bite" on hard, smooth surfaces like metal, especially at extreme angles.
Armour Piercing Capped.

Strangely enough (calm down Mods it was declassified 30 years ago) the 120mm APDS was held in Ammo Depots in internally secured, seperately fenced storage beacause of the penetrator "knuckle" on the top of the penetrator.
 

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