Since arriving in this South Pacific post-colonial paradise, I've noticed that the language usage is a wee but different from the UK norm.

Especially the use of the word "Bugger"

In the UK, it's not really deemed an acceptable usage in everyday conversation, but down here it is.



It's easiest to define using examples:

Hit thumb with hammer; "Bugger!"

Ask a stranger to leave your premises; "Bugger off!"

Feeling a trifle tired (like after 80 minutes playing for the All Blacks (see sport or religion)); "I'm buggered"

Telling someone (normally a boss) that they lack the requisite knowledge; "You know bugger all!"

You've been hit with a force 9 earthquake, your stock have got foot& mouth, your wife's left you for a civil servant, your unmarried daughter's just told you she's pregnant(again) and your son has just arrived with the police, who are inquiring what all those funny plants are doing growing in the back paddock under the camouflage netting; "It's a bit of a bugger"

How do you use it?

Here's some everyday examples.

 
You'll get his hopes up.
 
Buggerlugs springs to mind.
 
Since arriving in this South Pacific post-colonial paradise, I've noticed that the language usage is a wee but different from the UK norm.

Especially the use of the word "Bugger"

In the UK, it's not really deemed an acceptable usage in everyday conversation, but down here it is.



It's easiest to define using examples:

Hit thumb with hammer; "Bugger!"

Ask a stranger to leave your premises; "Bugger off!"

Feeling a trifle tired (like after 80 minutes playing for the All Blacks (see sport or religion)); "I'm buggered"

Telling someone (normally a boss) that they lack the requisite knowledge; "You know bugger all!"

You've been hit with a force 9 earthquake, your stock have got foot& mouth, your wife's left you for a civil servant, your unmarried daughter's just told you she's pregnant(again) and your son has just arrived with the police, who are inquiring what all those funny plants are doing growing in the back paddock under the camouflage netting; "It's a bit of a bugger"

How do you use it?

Here's some everyday examples.



Bugger in the North isn't swearing. Saying someone is a daft bugger or telling someone to bugger off, or that you're buggered or they know bugger all, no one up here bats an eye.

When down sarf, I took great delight in using it as often as I could to see the horrified faces, even after being told it was rude: it's not rude where I'm from. However, I often heard people down sarf saying twat a lot; that is a big no-no and would get you into trouble pdq.

Your accent, dialectic idiom and respsonse may vary.
 
I use it when I have botty sex with the wife. I have an arrangement where I do jobs for her in return for sexual favour. For example; " PC supa will you take all that rubbish to the tip for me ? "

" of course but I shall want to bugger you later "

" No problem get rid of the rubbish first "

"Yes I am on my way, get lubed up."
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Bugger in the North isn't swearing. Saying someone is a daft bugger or telling someone to bugger off, or that you're buggered or they know bugger all, no one up here bats an eye.

When down sarf, I took great delight in using it as often as I could to see the horrified faces, even after being told it was rude: it's not rude where I'm from. However, I often heard people down sarf saying twat a lot; that is a big no-no and would get you into trouble pdq.

Your accent, dialectic idiom and respsonse may vary.
Queer fellah didn't use to mean a chap from Brighton, it just meant here in Sussex that the person was odd or different. Similar usage in parts of North Cornwall when I was growing up, something unusual could be a bit queer.
 
A thread entitled 'Bugger' surely belongs in the ArrseHole... surprised it isn't already there to be honest.
 
As I spent the majority of my childhood in foreign climes, I didn't become familiar with English slang/swear words until I went to boarding school at the age of 15. Of course most of my school friends threw the word "bugger" about like confetti and I had no idea it was considered rude until on a rare weekend home, playing cards with my mother and she won a hand. I called her a cheating bugger and I was taught very swiftly exactly how unacceptable that word was!
 
As I spent the majority of my childhood in foreign climes, I didn't become familiar with English slang/swear words until I went to boarding school at the age of 15. Of course most of my school friends threw the word "bugger" about like confetti and I had no idea it was considered rude until on a rare weekend home, playing cards with my mother and she won a hand. I called her a cheating bugger and I was taught very swiftly exactly how unacceptable that word was!
She proceeded to bugger you with a large cucumber?
 

pitcairn

Old-Salt
One of my favourite sayings when something goes wrong is 'buggeration'.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
As I spent the majority of my childhood in foreign climes, I didn't become familiar with English slang/swear words until I went to boarding school at the age of 15. Of course most of my school friends threw the word "bugger" about like confetti and I had no idea it was considered rude until on a rare weekend home, playing cards with my mother and she won a hand. I called her a cheating bugger and I was taught very swiftly exactly how unacceptable that word was!
There was a lovely quiet Kneipe, "zum Why Not?" behind "zum Braumeister" opposite Alanbrooke Barracks. The landlady was fit as fúck, nice and spoke passable English.

One evening there was her, me, the even fitter, English barmaid and a random Kraut. We all crowded round the Flipper. I thought there might be a lock in and a promise.

The landlady tilted, smacked the machine and muttered, "Fúcking machine." Three intakes of breath. Barmaid and I asked if she knew what she'd said.

"Yes, I know what it means. Squaddy keeps telling me, 'Get me another fúcking beer.'" We explained. She ran screaming to the cellar and didn't emerge.

There was no lock in.
 
Last edited:
As Grumpy said oop north not really swearing. Kids were often called "cheeky buggers" however calling someone a "cheeky get" in North Manchester was proper swearing and yes I mean get not git.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
One of my favourite sayings when something goes wrong is 'buggeration'.


That's just so common. The proper refined word is 'embuggeration'. It just needs a bit more in the way of a Latin/French prefix to make it posher, you see.
 
As I spent the majority of my childhood in foreign climes, I didn't become familiar with English slang/swear words until I went to boarding school at the age of 15. Of course most of my school friends threw the word "bugger" about like confetti and I had no idea it was considered rude until on a rare weekend home, playing cards with my mother and she won a hand. I called her a cheating bugger and I was taught very swiftly exactly how unacceptable that word was!

<CENSORED>
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top