Brussels sprouts - bitter as hell?

#1
Does anyone have a good recipe which stops these evil mini-cabbages tasting as bitter as hell?

msr
 
#2
jarrod248 said:
msr said:
Does anyone have a good recipe which stops these evil mini-cabbages tasting as bitter as hell?

msr
Yes boil in salted water with bicarbonate of soda for about three hours, that should sort them.
And put crosses in their bottoms.

Heheheeee, I said bottoms :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
#3
When you say bitter do you actually mean bitter or just a horrible taste?
If its bitter it means a bad crop and nothing will make them taste nicer.
If its horrible to taste add chestnuts (doesn't make them any nicer just looks better) or a cheese sauce. I used to sprinkle vinegar over brussels sprouts and green cabbage to make them more enticing. But to be honest you either like them or not whatever you do.
 
#4
You are buying them too early for a start. Like Sloes, Brussels should not be used until after the first frost; it helps break the cell structure down.

Cook until just past al-dente, drain off the water and leave in the warm pan for 10-15 minutes with a large nob of butter and some olive oil (and possibly some ground Nutmeg).

There are also several recipes on-line for cooking them with Lardons and Marrons, which as a classic dish works well.
 
#5
Jarrod, do not start. Do not say fat and ugly, or you will get in trouble. :wink:

Don't say fat. Don't say fat.
 
L

Lechies

Guest
#6
I think it was an episode on Bottom where they made Sprouts Mexicane, I can't get on youtube on works PC but I'm sure you'll find it for yourself, enjoy.

On a more serious note, I boil mine and then honey roast them, they still taste firking awful though.
 
#7
jarrod248 said:
Gremlin said:
You are buying them too early for a start. Like Sloes, Brussels should not be used until after the first frost; it helps break the cell structure down.

Cook until just past al-dente, drain off the water and leave in the warm pan for 10-15 minutes with a large nob of butter and some olive oil (and possibly some ground Nutmeg).

There are also several recipes on-line for cooking them with Lardons and Marrons, which as a classic dish works well.
Agree they need a frost but i'm afraid t'other half won't eat them unless like mush.
He's ginger, what does he know?
 
#8
Gremlin said:
You are buying them too early for a start. Like Sloes, Brussels should not be used until after the first frost; it helps break the cell structure down.

Cook until just past al-dente, drain off the water and leave in the warm pan for 10-15 minutes with a large nob of butter and some olive oil (and possibly some ground Nutmeg).
I agree Grem frost is important, some years ago I remember throwing all mine away on Christmas day because the taste was abysmal - no frost that year.

Will try your simple recipe though at Christmas. Cheers.
 
#9
A really simple recipe that makes them pretty damn tasty.

If your lazy you can get ready to eat/reheat ones straight from the tin.

Fying pan with a generous knob of unsalted butter on a high heat.

Add any particular spices you desire...I dont bother.

Slice the sprouts in half and drop in the pan.

Sear them until crispy.

enjoy.
 
#10
I have a great recipe for Brussels, but the last time I offered a comment Jarrod yelled at me so I ain't posting it. :oops:
 
#11
For Christmas dinner, wait until roast potatoes are almost cooked, then throw prepared sprouts into the roasting tin for last ten minutes - delicious!
Crisp and sweet.
 
#12
I find boiling them for a very very long time makes your house smell of the evil buggers. Much better to buy a bag of frozen prepped Brussels and just leave them in the bottom of the freezer. Have some spinach instead-bit of butter, some black pepper. Carrots are nice too
 
#14
msr said:
Does anyone have a good recipe which stops these evil mini-cabbages tasting as bitter as hell?

msr
MSR - The tips given above may well help. A not insignificant percentage of people fall into the category of being "Super Tasters" with a heightened sense of taste in certain areas:

Background info::
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertaster

Take the test:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/interactives/supertaster/


Edited to add:
-Perceive all tastes as more intense than other taster types, particularly bitter tastes
-Tend to be fussy about their food and have strong food likes and dislikes
-Usually don't like coffee, grapefruit, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and spinach
-Have lots of papillae, the tiny bumps on the tongue that contain taste buds
Around 25% of people are said to be supertasters

Which Kind of Taster Are You?
The Saccharin Test: Mix one pack of saccharin (Sweet'N Low) into two-thirds of a cup of water. Now taste the water. You'll probably taste a mix of both bitter and sweet, but focus on which taste is stronger.

If the sweet taste is dominant, it means you're probably an undertaster. If bitter is the dominant taste, it means you're probably a supertaster. If it's a tie, you are in the half of the population of regular tasters, so don't sweat it. Surely, you may have to do the test more than once to tease out differences.

The Blue-Tongue Test: Wipe a swab of blue food dye on your tongue and inspect the small circles of pink-colored tissue that polka dot the newly painted blue tongue. Those are called papillae. Then, put a piece of paper -- with a 4 mm hole, or the size of a hole punch in three-ring paper -- over your tongue.

Use a magnifying glass to count the little pink dots you see in the hole. If you count fewer then five dots, it means you're an undertaster, while more than 30 indicates you're probably a supertaster.
 
#15
Cut some smoked dry cured bacon into 1 inch pieces. Fry in oil until done. Grate your sprouts and stir fry in the bacon oil over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes. Add to the bacon. You won't believe you're eating sprouts.
 
#16
Mr_Bridger said:
msr said:
Does anyone have a good recipe which stops these evil mini-cabbages tasting as bitter as hell?

msr
MSR - The tips given above may well help. A not insignificant percentage of people fall into the category of being "Super Tasters" with a heightened sense of taste in certain areas:

Background info::
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertaster

Take the test:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/interactives/supertaster/
We found this out last Christmas at a big dinner when the sprout debate broke out, I happened to be sat next to someone who knew why who pointed me to this:

Why do they taste bitter?

Known as glucosinolates (which include sinigrin, progoitrin and glucobrassicin), these bitter-tasting plant chemicals are designed to put off peckish predators because while you may not want to eat sprouts, sprouts do not want to be eaten either, hence they have developed these weapons of self-defence.

But some people adore sprouts

The reason why some people love sprouts is probably on account of genetic variations in our taste perceptions, researchers say. Scientists are able to test these by getting people to taste a little piece of paper impregnated with tiny amounts of a chemical with a similar structure to those found in sprouts.

It's all in your taste buds

The scientists say that we can be divided into non-tasters, medium-tasters and super-tasters, and that the latter appear to have a higher density of taste buds than the other two groups. It is the super-tasters among us who steadfastly protest their dislike of sprouts, and quite often do not enjoy green tea, coffee, grapefruit juice and other cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and broccoli, all of which share bitter-tasting undertones. The medium-tasters are those who do not like sprouts much, but manage to tolerate them on their one and only annual exposure at Christmas lunch. Non-tasters tuck in with gay abandon.

Spare a thought for women

It appears that the majority of super- tasters are women. This makes evolutionary sense given that women were the “gatherers” and foraged for berries and so on. Bitterness was a warning of toxicity in a food, which put women off trotting back to the cave with poisonous fare. With this in mind, it has made sense for industry to use “debittering” processes to make them more acceptable. This is where health experts and food companies differ. The former want more glucosinolates because they appear to have cancer-fighting powers, while the latter want fewer to make them more palatable. Given that you also get vitamin C, carotenes and folate from sprouts, the food industry may have a point.

Be kind to sprout-haters

However, no matter how engineered, super-tasters will detect bitter notes in this little vegetable. So this year, when promising to spread a little goodwill, start with the poor relative who gags at the sight of your sprouts. Pile his or her plate with extra carrots instead and save the sprouts for those who love them.

Amanda Ursell is the Times nutritionist
From here: The Times


It seems that no matter what you do to the little beggars some people will never like them, even sugar coated.....mmmmmmmm!
 

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