BRNO Mod 2 .22lr

#1
A long shot here..

I recently picked up an old Mod 2 that has seen better days, the important bits are fine but the stock looks like it's been used for beating the bunnies to death and blunting barbed wire fencing. I can fix most things, but this would need filler and paint to make it presentable.

Does anyone have a decent walnut stock for one of these kicking about that could be exchanged for beer tokens?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#2
Keep a look out on the auction websites
 
#3
If you can't fid one try looking at some of this guy's stock refinishing idea's, some new approaches here!.

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ugly

LE
Moderator
#4
Easy enough to make one!
I have finished a couple from Boyds, they get better the more you do.
That said I am looking to restock a sporter SMLE into a one piece stock and rebarrel into something like 45-70 or 444 Marlin.
The story behind the 2 piece stock goes back to the butts ordered by Enfield for the .402 Enfield Martini.
We had ordered 100 000 to be made and when the Lee Enfield was adopted they decided on a 2 piece stock to use up the ones already made for the ME.
I wont be able to buy a suitable preformed stock from Boyds for the LE so I will bodge a donor mauser stock first to see if it can be done and then order one to fiinish properly!
 
#5
Thanks for the suggestions, I took an orbital sander to the stock yesterday in an act of desperation and the stock has come out considerably lighter but devoid of all the deep scratches.

Even better, it's walnut rather than the beech I thought it was so now starting to lay down the layers of oil and rubbing down with wire wool. Once the action has been blued it should be a tidy little rifle.
 
#6
Easy enough to make one!
I have finished a couple from Boyds, they get better the more you do.
That said I am looking to restock a sporter SMLE into a one piece stock and rebarrel into something like 45-70 or 444 Marlin.
The story behind the 2 piece stock goes back to the butts ordered by Enfield for the .402 Enfield Martini.
We had ordered 100 000 to be made and when the Lee Enfield was adopted they decided on a 2 piece stock to use up the ones already made for the ME.
I wont be able to buy a suitable preformed stock from Boyds for the LE so I will bodge a donor mauser stock first to see if it can be done and then order one to fiinish properly!
I've made a couple from scratch, the results weren't pretty! My skills are more metal orientated than wood work.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#7
Thanks for the suggestions, I took an orbital sander to the stock yesterday in an act of desperation and the stock has come out considerably lighter but devoid of all the deep scratches.

Even better, it's walnut rather than the beech I thought it was so now starting to lay down the layers of oil and rubbing down with wire wool. Once the action has been blued it should be a tidy little rifle.
Ouch sanding removes wood, in good wood dents can be lifted with a damp towel and a hot iron, last resort is to remove wood it affects stock fit!
 
#8
Ouch sanding removes wood, in good wood dents can be lifted with a damp towel and a hot iron, last resort is to remove wood it affects stock fit!
If it were just dents then I'd agree completely, unfortunately there were multiple deep scratches breaking the fibres all over the place. The options were either fill and paint it, take the sander to it, or fire wood.

The really good news is that I've just picked up a BSA CF2 that's wearing a lovely piece of walnut and I'm spending this evening steaming out a few small dinks, flatting and then starting again with the oil in between putting coats on the BRNO stock. Happy days!
 
#9
I used to have a tidy little Mod 2. I used it to kill things - I can't say I was that bothered about dings in the stock. Perhaps its my old rifle you've got?
 
#10
I've got a Brno mod 2 which I picked up for peanuts a few years ago due to the state of the stock. A fortnight's graft, lovingly stripping the old finish, steaming out dents and sanding until it was like gloss brought it back to it's former glory. I applied 5 or so layers of Tru Oil, leaving 24hrs curing between each coat, lightly sanding before applying the next and finished it with a conditioner. Still using it regularly and it still looks the bollocks.
 
#12
#13
I also have a mod 2, cracking little rifle. The stock's in good nick and I'll not be touching it. I've done a bit of re-finishing in the past and found that I started behaving like a homo trying to protect the finish I had lovingly achieved, rather than treating the weapon as I should, ie as a precision tool to be used for a purpose.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#19
I have seen what patience and a good deal of care can do to restore a rifle. A mate at Wednesbury had a BSA and Co Snider carbine he bought at a steal and it had sat at the bottom of a pile in Ma Parkers for so long it wasnt recognisable. lots of TLC later and it looked its age but it also looked like it hadnt been fired. In fact there was a tide mark around the stock and down the barrel where it had been submerged at some point.
lots of time steaming dents produced what looked like a rifle stored since 1860 and not a Ma Parker cellar special.
 
#20
The stock has come up well with a few layers of tru-oil and is now good to go.

The metalwork has taken some work but is now close to a mirror finish, there are a few dinks that would look odd if they were polished out completely. Next step is to have a go at doing a fume blue once I've made a rifle boiling pan.
 

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