Brits in Foreign Armies

I'm not convinced V&S had been invented back then. ;)
True, one could only say one was just obeying orders....
:rofl:
 

foxs_marine

War Hero
Or Alistair MacK NZ Army (Vietnam), UK, SA, back to UK.
I read his book, a really good story though it seemed to me that every time he'd had enough of somewhere he was able to pack it in, move elsewhere & start again quickly and easily.
 
Or Alistair MacK NZ Army (Vietnam), UK, SA, back to UK.
Very well remembered sir ! I did serve alongside him for a while as well to my embarrassment.
 

QRK2

LE
Very well remembered sir ! I did serve alongside him for a while as well to my embarrassment.
I went to Vietnam with him (on his second, less eventful, visit).

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(before anyone gets up themselves about PERSEC, his pics are in his book)
 
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I believe you already - i was referring only to the Spanish legion, whose parade videos posted on Arrse threads must have led to tumescence in many a closet Arrser.

Re IDF, not quite any but all citizens and persons with permanent reident status are liable to be called up for military service. That would not include visitors from other countries working as volunteers on a kibbutz. There are all kinds of exemptions for various reasons. Your age when you arrived in Israel has much bearing on the length of service or whether you have to serve at all.
One of my lifes greatest regrets is not having served in the IDF.
 
Just for clarification, to serve in the ADF you must be an Australian citizen. This dates back to Vietnam where there were accusations of British (non-dual national) serving in the Australian Army being labeled as mercenaries by the left-wing press. Due to this, you must be an Australian to serve (though can retain dual nationality with no drama, particularly for Commonwealth nations). I don't know whether still the practice, but had some Canucks working for me in Canberra who received their Australian citizenship at the High Commission in Ottawa as part of their joining package just before they flew out to Oz. I know of a number of ex-British Forces serving in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Not trying to be pedantic (it comes naturally) but when I jumped through the hoops in Brisbane in 1983 I was required to have applied for citizenship before I could be attested. The reason being there could be a wait of some weeks before a citizenship ceremony was scheduled and I was in the country on a work visa which required me to work (or at least be employed, apparently there's a subtle difference).
 
South Africa changed the law in 1984 so that all young male immigrants who had permanent residence were automatically made SA citizens, thus eligible for two years of National Service, plus camps afterwards. Same as home-grown Saffers.
So a fair few lads donned the brown suit.

Edit: Passport states re Dual nationals that British nationals are not exempt from national service in the 'other' country they are nationals of.
44 Para Pathfinder before that. The Philistines. Plenty of Brits.
 
When I hear a herd/gaggle/squad of Marines Hoohah'ing I always get this image in my mind of someone with chipped beef on toast stuck in their throat and trying to clear it before choking. ;)
I always get the image of a silverback male gorilla (gunny) grunting and pounding the ground while his coterie of lesser males follow his lead and do the same.

Takes a shitload of willpower not to throw bananas at them.
 
Legend seems almost too vague. He served in the British Parachute regiment in Cyprus, became a Policeman in Rhodesia, joined the Met Police in London and of course, commanded a 7th Cav Company at Ia Drang - virtually saving the battalion by his leadership on the flank. He had predicted an aircraft attack on the twin towers and tried to get his firm (Morgan Stanley) to relocate their c. 2700 staff - most of whom survived 9/11 because of the rigerous evacuation drills he had made them practice. He died when after getting almost all of them out, he went back in to check. Utter hero if ever their was one.View attachment 415411View attachment 415412View attachment 415412
Wonder if the folks he worked with in the tower felt that way before the attacks, particularly the Rhodie bit? Terrorism always seems to be acceptable to certain more enlightened sectors of society until it lands on your doorstep.

Solid bloke, no question.
 
The "pay" was so negligible it can hardly be described a pay or wages - pocket or cigarette money would be more accurate.
Basically IDF conscripts were subsidized by their families - one more "hidden" cost of the defense set up.
That changed fairly radically about 4 years ago.
As a "Spearhead warrior" in his third year of conscript service, my son began to be paid something over a hundred quid a week. His "Spearhead" ID card came charged with over 200 quid of dosh for purchasing things and allowed free travel including while in civilian clothing. With all clothing, meals and accommodation provided and precious little time for buying things anyway, he was fairly flush and didn't need us to subsidize him. They also get a nice lump sum after being discharged and first university degree study paid for.

As a non combatant soldier, his brother, who was drafted 3 years earlier and was in IT/signals only received about 25 quid a week "pocket money". however, in IT he received state of the art training, hands on training, experience, responsibility, leadership experience that money can't buy, not to speak of networking and contacts across the industry with top professionals doing their stints of reserve service with him. In his 4th year (compulsory due to the IT training but at full regular army pay and conditions), through such contacts he was already receiving tempting job offers virtually every week.
SADF NS back in the day, the basic pay was around 4 quid a month at today's rates with danger pay and bush pay doubling that.

Can of beer in the canteen was around 1.5p though, so not too crap (except we were only allowed two a night).
 
One of my lifes greatest regrets is not having served in the IDF.
Was speaking to the local embassy about that around the time the opportunity came up to spend a year in the Antarctic. Always wondered what might have been but sometimes you just have to grab the chance as it arises.
 
SADF NS back in the day, the basic pay was around 4 quid a month at today's rates with danger pay and bush pay doubling that.

Can of beer in the canteen was around 1.5p though, so not too crap (except we were only allowed two a night).
Saffers told me about Louis, the train that takes you home, and the rythm of its wheels on the rails.....
 

Auldsod

Old-Salt
There are British born officers in the Irish Defence Forces. I am aware or have encountered them in all three services. Kind of blend in a bit after a while unsurprisingly.
 
SADF NS back in the day, the basic pay was around 4 quid a month at today's rates with danger pay and bush pay doubling that.

Can of beer in the canteen was around 1.5p though, so not too crap (except we were only allowed two a night).
When I joined up the pay was a fiver a week..........which prompted my son to exclaim recently......"You got paid weekly.....what was it, the Boer war?"
 
Wonder if the folks he worked with in the tower felt that way before the attacks, particularly the Rhodie bit? Terrorism always seems to be acceptable to certain more enlightened sectors of society until it lands on your doorstep.

Solid bloke, no question.
He was in constant conflict with the upper tiers of management at Morgan Stanley because of his insistence that everyone would practice his evacuation drills every three months. I would hope that the survivors learned major lessons about devolved leadership and listening.
 
I was at a conference at HQ ARRC back when it was still in Germany and we got chatting to a German Army major. One of my colleagues complemented him on his accent-less English and asked if he had been to the UK often. The reply was only once, but it was for six years and he had been to school there. I'd been wondering why he looked familiar and it was at this point that I realised that the last time we had met was when he was a couple of years senior to me in the CCF. Apparently he'd had option on leaving school of joining either the Brit or German Armies and chose the latter (between you and me I suspect he failed RCB).
Maybe the DS didn't like his final solution.
 

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