Brits in Foreign Armies

foxs_marine

War Hero
Just read an article in the New Yorker about him... he was, as soldiers in Scottish regiments would say, "Some Man!" Thank God for such as he!
Any chance of a link Busterdog?
 

foxs_marine

War Hero
As well you should be.
Slightly off topic, my (Cornish) aunt married a USN SeaBee who was in Cornwall for D-Day. After D-Day he went to the Pacific & then my aunt & my cousin went to live in the US. At a reunion in Cornwall this summer I discovered that they are both buried in Arlington Cemetery - Petty Officer (CM1) Domenic Joseph Pulice USN, 1918 - 2000.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
There was a campaign after 9/11 to get him a posthumous decoration to recognise his bravery. I wrote to Andrew George, then the MP for Hayle, who was backing it. His reply to me was that it had been refused on the grounds that Rescorla had become a US citizen & that not enough of those saved were British to outweigh the citizenship issue.
We can be utter pricks sometimes
 
We can be utter pricks sometimes
There were some posthumous honors including:
Rescorla was honored with the White Cross of Cornwall/An Grows Wyn a Gernow award from his native Cornwall in 2003 by the Revived Cornish Stannary Parliament.
In 2009, Fort Benning, Georgia, unveiled a statue of Rescorla.

 

foxs_marine

War Hero
There were some posthumous honors including:
Rescorla was honored with the White Cross of Cornwall/An Grows Wyn a Gernow award from his native Cornwall in 2003 by the Revived Cornish Stannary Parliament.
In 2009, Fort Benning, Georgia, unveiled a statue of Rescorla.

Thanks JJH, looks like his adopted land did him proud.
 

foxs_marine

War Hero
South Africa changed the law in 1984 so that all young male immigrants who had permanent residence were automatically made SA citizens, thus eligible for two years of National Service, plus camps afterwards. Same as home-grown Saffers.
So a fair few lads donned the brown suit.

Edit: Passport states re Dual nationals that British nationals are not exempt from national service in the 'other' country they are nationals of.
Certainly, i got called up for the French Army whilst serving in the British one. Didn't have to go though the Colonel was having none of it.
Recieved a certificate of exemption from the French.
 
If you guys are talking about dual citizenship, a Turkish (and British) original got called up but did a reduced service after finishing his PhD in Cambridge.
 

Chef

LE
Point of order:

In general, Army "Hooah," Marines "Oorah."

A long time ago it was generally a reply amongst the Rangers of "HUA!" for Heard, Understood, and Acknowledged. But it's allyness spread and thus, was diluted.


'Nuff said :)
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
I thought it used to be compulsory for Jewish and Druze citizens. But Israeli Arabs and Christians could volunteer?
2 years for women and 3 for men (in 89)
I half heartly attempted to join in 89
Recruit center was in Jaffa, at the time
The contraint to join was excessive
Convert to Judiasim
Pay
Chaperon for any jewish girl freind
Had one, Smaty (sp)
She worked in security too
The pish poor wage, per month
Couple of hundred shiekles, at the time
Did the interviews and chit
Shot my crow and went back to the Legion

Polaks, before they joined the European Community, were not allowed to join a foreign army
Think, it was true for the Dutch too
They could loose their nationality)
E.C. accords etc put an end to that
Think, it was the Treaty of Nice. ..but i might be wrong
 
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2 years for women and 3 for men (in 89)
I half heartly attempted to join in 89
Recruit center was in Jaffa, at the time
The contraint to join was excessive
Convert to Judiasim
Pay
Chaperon for any jewish girl freind
Had one, Smaty (sp)
She worked in security too
The pish poor wage, per month
Couple of hundred shiekles, at the time

Did the interviews and chit
Shot my crow and went back to the Legion

Polaks, before they joined the European Community, were not allowed to join a foreign army
Think, it was true for the Dutch too
They could loose their nationality)
E.C. accords etc put an end to that
Think, it was the Treaty of Nice. ..but i might be wrong
The "pay" was so negligible it can hardly be described a pay or wages - pocket or cigarette money would be more accurate.
Basically IDF conscripts were subsidized by their families - one more "hidden" cost of the defense set up.
That changed fairly radically about 4 years ago.
As a "Spearhead warrior" in his third year of conscript service, my son began to be paid something over a hundred quid a week. His "Spearhead" ID card came charged with over 200 quid of dosh for purchasing things and allowed free travel including while in civilian clothing. With all clothing, meals and accommodation provided and precious little time for buying things anyway, he was fairly flush and didn't need us to subsidize him. They also get a nice lump sum after being discharged and first university degree study paid for.

As a non combatant soldier, his brother, who was drafted 3 years earlier and was in IT/signals only received about 25 quid a week "pocket money". however, in IT he received state of the art training, hands on training, experience, responsibility, leadership experience that money can't buy, not to speak of networking and contacts across the industry with top professionals doing their stints of reserve service with him. In his 4th year (compulsory due to the IT training but at full regular army pay and conditions), through such contacts he was already receiving tempting job offers virtually every week.
 
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Any chance of a link Busterdog?
FM... I googled his name... and several articles popped up the New Yorker one was the most interesting... he was a man of many talents... author, screen writer, lecturer, security/int consultant... one heck of a brave soldier... and a MAN well worth knowing by all accounts.
I'm rather old and technologically inept so posting a link is beyond me! Apologies.
Regards,
BD
 
I still have a letter signed by the Zimbabwean Military Attaché in London in 1981 stating that "Jim the Binbag, a Zimbabwean citizen by birth and a British Citizen by descent is not required, at this time, for service in the armed forces of Zimbabwe" If I were a coupla years older I may well have found myself summoned and required to join the Rhodesian Army. How did I come to be a Zimbo Brit? My Dad was a London lad who served in the RN as a HO rating from 1942 to 46 and was then discharged due to peace breaking out. London was a mess and one morning cycling past an undamaged building the Boy Scout in him was taken by the picture of a mounted military type complete with pith helmet and glossy boots so walked in and said "I'll join that lot, who are they?" Turns out it was a recruitment poster for the BSAP in Rhodesia House. He loved it. He was the senior Copper at Kariba on the Rhodesian / Zambian border at UDI and would talk about the weirdness of finding himself being watched across a hostile border by his mate from London in the Zambian Police who used to walk across at lunch time for a beer and a chat!
 

QRK2

LE
I was at a conference at HQ ARRC back when it was still in Germany and we got chatting to a German Army major. One of my colleagues complemented him on his accent-less English and asked if he had been to the UK often. The reply was only once, but it was for six years and he had been to school there. I'd been wondering why he looked familiar and it was at this point that I realised that the last time we had met was when he was a couple of years senior to me in the CCF. Apparently he'd had option on leaving school of joining either the Brit or German Armies and chose the latter (between you and me I suspect he failed RCB).
 
I was at a conference at HQ ARRC back when it was still in Germany and we got chatting to a German Army major. One of my colleagues complemented him on his accent-less English and asked if he had been to the UK often. The reply was only once, but it was for six years and he had been to school there. I'd been wondering why he looked familiar and it was at this point that I realised that the last time we had met was when he was a couple of years senior to me in the CCF. Apparently he'd had option on leaving school of joining either the Brit or German Armies and chose the latter (between you and me I suspect he failed RCB).
Not Values & Standards baseline testing?
 

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