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Brits in Foreign Armies

Mufulira

War Hero
Yes, I did. Peter McAleese, who was a Sgt. Major in 3 armies, finishing his time with ' The Philistines' in South Africa. Ron Cook (RIP ) killed in a contact with SWAPO had previously served with 1 Para, then with Hereford before departing to Rhodesia and subsequently onto to SA.
Many of the training Staff in the Federal Army of Rhodesia and Nyasaland were from British Army especially Sigs technical types and IIRC one who was RAF Regiment in a Bloodhound Battery, a sprinkling of RE types who managed to look very, very cool with leather Jerkins and sporting P38's instead of Browning HP's. Must have scored those whilst BAOR based. Epitome of warry elegance!
 

Tiger-Monkey2

War Hero
A very good mate of mine who died a couple of years ago served in the Rhodesian Military Police, Rhodesian Prison Service, The Royal Australian Regiment, and finally, the Royal New Zealand Military Police.

My father served in both the Royal Navy and Royal New Zealand Navy.
 

Norfolkred1

Clanker
I've told this before. Box Factory, Ayios Nicolaos, UNFICYP, late 76. Jock came in looking pale. He'd gone out and round the corner of the building to get something from his Ferret. A disembodied cockney voice from the Turkish lines asked him for a fag. Turned out he was half Turkish, went home on holiday, got conscripted, and had spent the last 18 months in this trench.

There are people who replied to this elsewhere have suggested he ended up driving someone senior.
Used to hear quite a lot of Cockerny in uniform when visiting the North when I was at Ay Nik 88-91. Used to be an in joke of where you from 'Bethnal Green mate'
 
Back in 1966 a young lad from Buxton, Derbyshire, slipped getting off the back of a truck in Vietnam. He died instantly.

He was buried at Terandak along with several other servicemen.

In 2016 the Malaysians made some changes to Terandak, and asked if they could repatriate the bodies.

Despite attempts, the NOK for this lad could not be located.

I was quite upset, as I thought he deserved a decent funeral after so long away. I am from Derbyshire myself.

I just googled him. He was given a fitting send off.

 
Back in 1966 a young lad from Buxton, Derbyshire, slipped getting off the back of a truck in Vietnam. He died instantly.

He was buried at Terandak along with several other servicemen.

In 2016 the Malaysians made some changes to Terandak, and asked if they could repatriate the bodies.

Despite attempts, the NOK for this lad could not be located.

I was quite upset, as I thought he deserved a decent funeral after so long away. I am from Derbyshire myself.

I just googled him. He was given a fitting send off.


Didn't realise the SASR wore a slouch hat.

 
Wasn't it brought back recently at one VSO's behest? And not necessarily to universal acclaim?

I can't remember when it was but a past Chief of Army decreed that everyone would wear the slouch hat when in Parade Dress. No exceptions. The reason given was OH & S, ie. long periods on parade in the sun. Which sort of missed the point that when worn on parade the left side of the brim is turned up, providing no sun protection. Cue grizzling from the obvious suspects. Gradually the beret sneaked back in and the last I saw (mid-last year) it was ops normal.
 
Back in 1966 a young lad from Buxton, Derbyshire, slipped getting off the back of a truck in Vietnam. He died instantly.

He was buried at Terandak along with several other servicemen.

In 2016 the Malaysians made some changes to Terandak, and asked if they could repatriate the bodies.

Despite attempts, the NOK for this lad could not be located.

I was quite upset, as I thought he deserved a decent funeral after so long away. I am from Derbyshire myself.

I just googled him. He was given a fitting send off.


Very good to see that he was appropriately interred and RIP the young bloke. Mind, I see that he served with the 'Royal Australian Air Force Paratroop regiment.' WTF?
 

Mufulira

War Hero
A very good mate of mine who died a couple of years ago served in the Rhodesian Military Police, Rhodesian Prison Service, The Royal Australian Regiment, and finally, the Royal New Zealand Military Police.

My father served in both the Royal Navy and Royal New Zealand Navy.
IIRC the Rhodie MP's were a tribe apart for sure and super at detectiving for sure. The Ndola WO's & Sgts mess has scored a whole side of primo quality beef for their annual/perennial BBQ in aid of homeless teen-age mums or something similar. An ambulance was detailed off to go to Bde HQ for the pickup of said beef instead of the usual RL ration truck and a single trooper i/c. The nifty little ambulance was quickly backed up to Q stores and a bloody side of beef was reverently lowered onto a stretcher and covered with a sheet, nonetheless a few blotches of blood seeped through which was gory to view. On the way back from the Bombay Boozer (1 Bde HQ) the MP LR waved the ambulance down and demanded travel warrant and authorization for said ambulance. Much shuffling of papers and Cpl Red Cap ripped open the doors and gagged at the sight of bloody mess on the stretcher and asked the driver Tpr W--- what happened "just a fatal road accident Cpl and need to head back to SAS Brks for examination". (Note: it was always easier to blame/include SAS for errant behaviour as they were always testing everybody else's alertness). The ambulance belonging to Selous Scouts who shared the Brks was waved on and the apparently unfunded cargo was delivered to WO's & Sgts Mess in fine style. Sgt Maj T----- and others from MP's were royally entertained at the Saturday Night BBQ (Braai) and commented on how fine the beef was. Widows and Orphans Fund had a banner night indeed.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
At the 'Meet the Marines' day at CTCRM in 1978, the Gunnery Sgt of the visiting USMC silent drill squad was a former Grenadier Guardsman ...... nice chap, very smart.......
 
In the early 1920s over 700 members of the RIC, many of them former British servicemen, were recruited en masse into the British Gendarmerie section of the Palestinian Police. It was the start of a long term relationship between Palestine and various branches of Irish police and the British army that lasted until the end of the mandate iin 1948.

My cousin was one of two NCOs who assisted the late Roy Farran in his escape to Damascas following his killing of a young Jewish suspected terrorist - Farran was found not guilty by court marshall, but papers subsequently released by the national archives indicate that he had admitted his guilt to his immediate superior Brigadier Bernard Fergusson and he had informed the Chief of Police -a former Royal Marine. Fergusson refused to testify and the CoP wasn't called as a witness. Fergusson went on to be Governer General New Zealand and Farran became a politician in Canada......nothing like a bit of service in a foreign military to spice up a career!
 
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I used to drink on tour with a USAF F-16 tech from Scotland. Parents moved over when he was early teens.
His own colleagues has as much difficulty understandinf him as we did.

Tall and good looking he ended up smashing the MILFy-looking RAF Clerk to the Comdr HQ British Forces
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
In the early 1920s over 700 members of the RIC, many of them former British servicemen, were recruited en masse into the British Gendarmerie section of the Palestinian Police. It was the start of a long term relationship between Palestine and various branches of Irish police and the British army that lasted until the end of the mandate iin 1948.

My cousin was one of two NCOs who assisted the late Roy Farran in his escape to Damascas following his killing of a young Jewish suspected terrorist - Farran was found not guilty by court marshall, but papers subsequently released by the national archives indicate that he had admitted his guilt to his immediate superior Brigadier Bernard Fergusson and he had informed the Chief of Police -a former Royal Marine. Fergusson refused to testify and the CoP wasn't called as a witness. Fergusson went on to be Governer General New Zealand and Farran became a politician in Canada......nothing like a bit of service in a foreign military to spice up a career!
Greetings Kinch: Many years ago did I perhaps read a book written about young Roy Farran,
 

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