British transport police are they all ******* useless?

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Mersey Tunnel police are normally just cone technicians but when they did 'pest control' they were taken to task for it. Put an artic across the road as two juvenille car thieves ' well known to Merseyside police custody officers' enetered the Wirral entrance and they did this at the Liverpool end. Killed them outright but according to their mothers they were good lads who loved their granny.

'The Police service was heavily criticised by the Merseyside coroner for its handling of a pursuit in which two 14-year-old boys were killed in 2003 after crashing a stolen car into a roadblock set up by Mersey Tunnels officers. The coroner went so far as to recommend that either the policing of the tunnel should be altogether transferred to Merseyside Police, or tunnel officers should be trained to national policing standards.[' from wiki.

Merseyside probably didn't want it as one of the things that MTP carry in their vehicles is BA set ala fire service and all police officers are BA qualified.
 
Yes, why not? A civvies catch crim, civilians take law into their own hands thread.
I see you are new here.
Every thread ever started on Arrse has stayed on topic....
 
In SA railway police were known as a stasie blompot - station plant pot. Generally a bunch of fat idle useless buggers employed to occupy space, until they were disbanded.

At one of the skydiving nationals in Vryheid in the '80s, a pissed up local jumper wound up one of the fat fookers and got shot for his trouble. Probably too fat and lazy to engage in a foot chase.
If a Japie Railway Inspector hadn't slung off a certain Mr Ghandi from a train for being in the wrong compartment we might still have a British Empire. F*cking boneheads.
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
Oooh....Old discussion but I have just noticed it.

Having served for a couple of years in the BTP and having now left, I can freely chuck in a few sixpence worth on this subject.

My station in the SE was a busy old area. A very busy area with a traditional BTP approach to manning levels. ....I.E. The size of the teams were dictated by some out of date formula that made no account of the huge geographical footprint, crime levels and other common sense factors to actually have teams of a strength to cover the job, and the teams were always understrength at the best of the times.

Our area had over 80 stations alone and on a worse case scenario ( that happened most bloody days ) you could be attending a call at DORKING and then get an emergency response requirement at DORCHESTER.....that is 130 odd miles or so. Even on a BLUE LIGHT run, you are looking about 1 and 1/2 hours response.........however, not every team actually has blue light drivers or even officers with a drivers licence.

Some days you will turn up for a shift and find jobs still progressing from the night before ( I recall it being a regular thing that MH jobs are often running past the 24 hour legal limit for example ) and you have lost officers before you even start.....you now might have 1 or if you are lucky 2 officers to effectively cover all of Hampshire,most of Surrey,Wiltshire and Berkshire and often required to assist other beleaguered teams in Dorset and occasionally into London.

Let that sink in. 1 officer, sometimes 2 officers to cover 4 to 6 counties as well as carry out their investigations, with most officers holding 30 or more jobs that need to be progressed and updated/interviews/CPS files......and some officers cannot drive.

I used to be in the MET and cursed the BTP due to them never being around.
 

Cromarty

War Hero
Don't feel too bad. Back in the day in Perth (Western Australia) it wasn't uncommon to put in a call for urgent assistance only to be told by comms there was no one to send. And that meant NO ONE from ANYWHERE. But hey, shit happens.
 
Don't feel too bad. Back in the day in Perth (Western Australia) it wasn't uncommon to put in a call for urgent assistance only to be told by comms there was no one to send. And that meant NO ONE from ANYWHERE. But hey, shit happens.
Nearest assistance in Queensland? You have some big old areas to police in Oz.
 
I once dealt with a heart attack victim on the motorway, no police, fire or ambulance available, too dark and foggy for air ambulance. We ended up taking the driver to hospital in his own vehicle. I drove the patrol car, my colleague followed me in his car with the patient in the passenger seat. We got there with minutes to spare, the doctor said he would have died if it wasn't for our prompt action.
 

IrishGuard

Old-Salt
Nearest assistance in Queensland? You have some big old areas to police in Oz.
Too right mate,

One of Australia's most remotely stationed police officers is set to retire after almost a decade posted in an isolated town in far south-west Queensland.

The Birdsville post has one of the harshest climates in the country and a jurisdiction roughly the size of the United Kingdom, which includes the Simpson Desert.

 
Too right mate,

One of Australia's most remotely stationed police officers is set to retire after almost a decade posted in an isolated town in far south-west Queensland.

The Birdsville post has one of the harshest climates in the country and a jurisdiction roughly the size of the United Kingdom, which includes the Simpson Desert.

I would much rather be stationed at the police post at Bondi beach thank you very much.
 
Too right mate,

One of Australia's most remotely stationed police officers is set to retire after almost a decade posted in an isolated town in far south-west Queensland.

The Birdsville post has one of the harshest climates in the country and a jurisdiction roughly the size of the United Kingdom, which includes the Simpson Desert.

He must have seriously pissed someone off in manning to draw that duty!
 
They're 45 mins away.
They always are.
But in all fairness their method for getting the attention seeking 'I'm going to kill myself' types off the bridges is far better and more effective than our pointless shutdown the road/railway and get the on call negotiator to bore them for several long hours to get in the nice warm van.
Slight thread drift.
A persistent attention seeking 'jumper' threatening to leap off the Craigavon Bridge in Derry in the 70s may, or may not, have been deterred from using that venue again after eventually giving a rather surprised shout and ending up in the water.
The RM RIB at Fort George fished them out and I heard they only chose dry land and street level venues from then on.

The bass broom kept the Vengeful machine Sanger was unavailable for interview at the time of posting.
 
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Oooh....Old discussion but I have just noticed it.

Having served for a couple of years in the BTP and having now left, I can freely chuck in a few sixpence worth on this subject.

My station in the SE was a busy old area. A very busy area with a traditional BTP approach to manning levels. ....I.E. The size of the teams were dictated by some out of date formula that made no account of the huge geographical footprint, crime levels and other common sense factors to actually have teams of a strength to cover the job, and the teams were always understrength at the best of the times.

Our area had over 80 stations alone and on a worse case scenario ( that happened most bloody days ) you could be attending a call at DORKING and then get an emergency response requirement at DORCHESTER.....that is 130 odd miles or so. Even on a BLUE LIGHT run, you are looking about 1 and 1/2 hours response.........however, not every team actually has blue light drivers or even officers with a drivers licence.

Some days you will turn up for a shift and find jobs still progressing from the night before ( I recall it being a regular thing that MH jobs are often running past the 24 hour legal limit for example ) and you have lost officers before you even start.....you now might have 1 or if you are lucky 2 officers to effectively cover all of Hampshire,most of Surrey,Wiltshire and Berkshire and often required to assist other beleaguered teams in Dorset and occasionally into London.

Let that sink in. 1 officer, sometimes 2 officers to cover 4 to 6 counties as well as carry out their investigations, with most officers holding 30 or more jobs that need to be progressed and updated/interviews/CPS files......and some officers cannot drive.

I used to be in the MET and cursed the BTP due to them never being around.
Same down our way. I have always found BTP to be professional, friendly and helpful. But...they are very few and far between and unless they are by luck in the area will take some tie to arrive. That said a few months ago my oppo and I were struggling to restrain a scrote outside a nightclub when up pulls a police vehicle that wasn't one of ours and out hop 2 BTP. Very welcome hands (and feet).
 
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So here I'm sitting in the house next to the railway station and can hear a crowd of folk shouting and probs pissed/stoned for the past 30mins plus who are messing about on the platform no soical distancing etc full view of the CCTV and where are the plod nowhere to be seen despite their offices at the staion 30mtrs away

Just before Christmas someone went missing in the area the night before reports might be on or around the railway line, Found dead curled up in a platform shelter 70mtrs from the office if that, Then ask if members of the public have seen anything regarding the missing person and to report it into them rather than them walking about and checking the platform /station area perhpas they might have found the person in time to safe their life?


My uncle stays opposite and regularly gets shit from the platform thrown over into his garden (needles/bottles/platform maintance rubbish by contractors etc despite raising it and asking for the CCTV footage to be checked to ID whos throwing the building rubbish in to the garden he's chinned off told that they wouldnt entertain it at the control office to shift through a number of days of footage he'd need the approx time(despit telling them what night it happend) He was told though if he threw it back onto the platform he'd get done for it under reckless endangerment but if they caught who was throwning the bottles over they would just send them round to pick it up with no further action by the duty Sgt when he complained to them and the station manager.

Reported what they thought was a stolen suitcase thrown into a neighbours gardern and never came for it think it's still there a few years later

He's phoned them up direct at the station before to report an incident and been told they wont investigate the aggro on the platform unless they get the nod from their control office in Inverness to intervene.

I've tried to chap them at the station up to report an incident and couldnt even be arsed to answer the door despite the vans being there outside it, Left me wondering how do I engage with them.

Even the Police Scotland copper who was looking in the empty yard next to the station didnt seem to impressed by them one day when he was searching for something thrown off the platform and I asked why wasnt BTP doing it.


Not saying all BT coppers are idle but these ones here seem to be well workshy and can't be out dealing with line jumpers etc and pissed up fights on trains from Glasgow for most of the year.


What do they actually do or have we just been unlucky and got a real life version of Cheif Wiggum and his deputies?

Moan over
So here I'm sitting in the house next to the railway station and can hear a crowd of folk shouting and probs pissed/stoned for the past 30mins plus who are messing about on the platform no soical distancing etc full view of the CCTV and where are the plod nowhere to be seen despite their offices at the staion 30mtrs away

Just before Christmas someone went missing in the area the night before reports might be on or around the railway line, Found dead curled up in a platform shelter 70mtrs from the office if that, Then ask if members of the public have seen anything regarding the missing person and to report it into them rather than them walking about and checking the platform /station area perhpas they might have found the person in time to safe their life?


My uncle stays opposite and regularly gets shit from the platform thrown over into his garden (needles/bottles/platform maintance rubbish by contractors etc despite raising it and asking for the CCTV footage to be checked to ID whos throwing the building rubbish in to the garden he's chinned off told that they wouldnt entertain it at the control office to shift through a number of days of footage he'd need the approx time(despit telling them what night it happend) He was told though if he threw it back onto the platform he'd get done for it under reckless endangerment but if they caught who was throwning the bottles over they would just send them round to pick it up with no further action by the duty Sgt when he complained to them and the station manager.

Reported what they thought was a stolen suitcase thrown into a neighbours gardern and never came for it think it's still there a few years later

He's phoned them up direct at the station before to report an incident and been told they wont investigate the aggro on the platform unless they get the nod from their control office in Inverness to intervene.

I've tried to chap them at the station up to report an incident and couldnt even be arsed to answer the door despite the vans being there outside it, Left me wondering how do I engage with them.

Even the Police Scotland copper who was looking in the empty yard next to the station didnt seem to impressed by them one day when he was searching for something thrown off the platform and I asked why wasnt BTP doing it.


Not saying all BT coppers are idle but these ones here seem to be well workshy and can't be out dealing with line jumpers etc and pissed up fights on trains from Glasgow for most of the year.


What do they actually do or have we just been unlucky and got a real life version of Cheif Wiggum and his deputies?

Moan over
As a former railway signaller with Network Rail Ive had experience of dealing with BTP operationally.
Individually there are some good officers but operationally, as an organisation they can come across as incompetent. From my own experience it was better to call the civilian police first when there was a need for police involvement in incidents.
A numbers of years ago, when dealing with a potential suicide, I first dealt with the civilian police in managing the incident; later on the BT police turned up, called myself and told me to disregard whatever info was relayed to me from the civvy police as they had no authority regards railway incidents. And that I was to let the trains run normally.
I had to then remind the BTP officer that only the signaller has final authority to determine if its safe for trains to run and how they should run based on the information they have. The episode then descended into a total farce with counter information coming into my self and our operational control centre from both police forces. Fortunately, in the end the person was found and no harm came to them, which was more due to our own control centre than the police.

On another occasion, when contacting BTP control centre in Birmingham. They had difficulty in finding the location of an incident on their computer even though they were given a six figure grid reference, street names and road numbers from a railway map. Unbelievable !

The money given for funding the BTP would be better spent on funding the civvy police to do the same role.
 
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