British Submachine guns in WWII

ugly

LE
Moderator
Cheers but I don't use chrome!
 
Poor sod, maybe a French speaker, the 1944 Battle Jerkin I am sure was designed to replace field punishment in the British Army.
Not only is he wearing the Battle jerkin, but the P37 webbing basic pouches and a pair of utility pouches
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Indeed, that's why the 14th were known as the Forgotten Army buy Hollywood put the world straight with the seminal documentary "Destination Burma"
My god, the whining 72 years after 1 movie, still...
 

ugly

LE
Moderator

ugly

LE
Moderator

ugly

LE
Moderator
Other than the file name "19th-flotilla-mgb-643-vahti-bay-turkey-1943", I know nothing
Excellent, sounds like the raiding forces in the Aegean etc. I was curious regarding the 08 Maxims on the left!
 
Sterlings were all silver soldered together, no spot welds, most parts machined from solid, with solid pins not roll pins ( not including the stock ) basically the most backward manufacturing methods . They must have been expensive to manufacture.
 
Sterlings were all silver soldered together, no spot welds, most parts machined from solid, with solid pins not roll pins ( not including the stock ) basically the most backward manufacturing methods . They must have been expensive to manufacture.
If you've ever taken a Sterling apart they are very well made for a long service life. They used better techniques than Enfield with the SA-80.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
 

ugly

LE
Moderator

ugly

LE
Moderator
You started it fella.
Well actually we did, we declared war, the Johnny come lately's turned up in time for tea and medals!
 
If you've ever taken a Sterling apart they are very well made for a long service life. They used better techniques than Enfield with the SA-80.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
I have. Just commenting on how surprised I was to find they were made by long obsolete methods.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I have. Just commenting on how surprised I was to find they were made by long obsolete methods.
Those aren't really long obsolete methods, traditional perhaps, some companies still make things that way, value engineering didn't arrive until the 1970's which destroyed traditional methods using lost wax investment casting instead of milling lumps of billet or forgings.
If you had to remake the sterling it would require those methods again. Sterling were using a traditional pre war method. They weren't averse to stampings, a look at the AR18 shows this. They did however make things to last!
 
Sorta like you guys think Burma's was all British show and forget the Nationalist Chinese and US units
That's a bite! ;)

Saving Private Ryan was a US film for (mostly) US audiences and any non-US involvement was carefully avoided, other than a mention of how useless Montgomery was. Entertainment, not a documentary.
 
.50 Vickers Mk III on Mk IV Naval mount for small craft
Indeed. Clearly .50 Vickers.

Also interesting is the P14 rifle, but then it is the Navy :)
 

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