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"British Intelligence and the IRA; the Secret War in NI, 69-88"

#3
..or alternatively, you could read Urban, Dillon and Holland & Phoenix in the original, as they provided the bulk of the good Lt Comdr's source material. Nothing new and a couple of pretty major misunderstandings in his work. That's an hour of my life I'll never get back.
 
#8
I'll keep you.

Even though you touch men xxx
I only touch men with bullets.

Wimmin, however, I give personal touches to for meaningful and in depth discourse, intercourse and sympathy of course. But that's only if you can stay the course.

By the way, you left your panties in my car. Do you always wear them for weeks at a time? Never mind, no need to answer that. Suffice it to say that the aroma of fermented soused herring will remain with me as a fond memory of you for years.
 
#10
Interesting, especially when viewed from the perspective of one who worked alongside some of the organisations concerned.
I took something away from it: the self proclaimed Tyrone Brigade were able, using newly arrived Soviet weaponry and equipment, to require the dispatch of 2 Bns from BAOR... has that really been written about much on Arrse?

What would have happened if they could have continued to receive bucketloads of weaponry and not suffered the losses they did at Loughgall?
 
#11
I took something away from it: the self proclaimed Tyrone Brigade were able, using newly arrived Soviet weaponry and equipment, to require the dispatch of 2 Bns from BAOR... has that really been written about much on Arrse?

What would have happened if they could have continued to receive bucketloads of weaponry and not suffered the losses they did at Loughgall?
It's bobbins. Ignore it.
 
#12
..or alternatively, you could read Urban, Dillon and Holland & Phoenix in the original, as they provided the bulk of the good Lt Comdr's source material. Nothing new and a couple of pretty major misunderstandings in his work. That's an hour of my life I'll never get back.

You old cynic you. It took me more than an hour to weave through his dissertation.

As a constructive comment, I feel that Lt. Cmdr. Bowlin USN could have discussed his Service who were associated with some alleged unsavoury activities at US Naval base in Clooney circa '69 > 75.
As I recall, there were allegations of assistance on their part to the nascant PIRA. The 1st. battalion of The Grens had reason to visit and did so in a very assertive manner- 74/75? The base closed in '77? with developing technology given as a reason, thus making the place redundant.

The Republican government of Gerald Ford in the USA at odds with Harold Wilson's Labour in UK were assumed to be the reason for the alleged support of PIRA.
 
#13
Cynic, moi?

I there was any USN support to the 'Ra in those days, I'd be tempted to look at local liaisons - smart young USN officers with Derry and Donegal Dorises, somehow they never seemed to click with their more dour equivalents in the Fountain or Coleraine - for an explanation. Don't think it (assuming it ever happened, which it didn't) was sanctioned or even known about at any level higher than, ooh, around full Commander USN level. Allegedly.
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#14
Ah well, if you liked that bit from September of 1999, then you might take a look at the earlier June offering, "PROTESTANT PARAMILITARIES IN NORTHERN IRELAND, 1969-1992" by LCDR Robert E. Rose. http://edocs.nps.edu/npspubs/scholarly/theses/1999/Jun/99Jun_Rose.pdf There are others. It would appear that 1999 was a good year for a hash of NI.

These are MA theses after all and designed to demonstrate some minimal level of competence and advancement potential for the officers who wrote them. So liberal doses of salt are in order.

Unsurprisingly, the thesis advisers are more interesting than the authors. Rasmussen did some interesting work in South America.
 
#15
Can sooo relate to the 14 int stuff, fond memories. eeeh the things we used to get upto. I sould write a book. Forget all your fridge throwing antics and hear some real situsations. If only I had the time.....
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#16
I don't doubt that there are quite a number of members who could write a book about their particular bit during that time. Probably even a good idea to do so, within reason. As previously mentioned in other posts there has been a fair number of oral history interviews and archive requests. And, depending upon who is conducting the work these can be sealed (or in some instances be required to be sealed) for various lengths of time.

In my fairly meaningless opinion, it might be useful to have an accurate account available rather than the usual skewed, sanitised and massaged official one.
 
#17
Wasn't there an attempted raid by PIRA on the US Navy's Communications site on 20 March 1974

From my own archives I have found the following two accounts of the same incident :

20 March 1974

Attempted Arms Raid Londonderry, Northern Ireland

Two members of the Provisional IRA attempted to raid the armoury of the US Navy’s Communications Clooney Station near Londonderry but panicked when they were challenged by an armed sentry and subsequently ran off. No shots were discharged by either side.

20 March 1974: In Northern Ireland, four masked guerrillas drove a hijacked truck into a U.S. Navy NATO communications centre outside Londonderry and opened fire on guards in an attempt to steal weapons. The raiders tied up three Americans and took another American hostage, but he escaped. The masked men fled on foot. No injuries were reported.
 
#18
a U.S. Navy NATO communications centre outside Londonderry
Well, was it US Navy or NATO? As far as I know, NATO installations are normally manned by personnel from the host nation, though often 'multi-nationalised' by bringing in some people from other member nations. More likely this was a USN station on the UK, Iceland Greenland SOSUS chain. After all, they owned it, and all the technology.
 
#19
Well, was it US Navy or NATO? As far as I know, NATO installations are normally manned by personnel from the host nation, though often 'multi-nationalised' by bringing in some people from other member nations. More likely this was a USN station on the UK, Iceland Greenland SOSUS chain. After all, they owned it, and all the technology.
It was a US Naval Communications Station (USNCOMMSTA Northern Ireland) and was originally built during the Second World War and manned by US Navy personnel and local civilians. It finally closed in 1977.

By the way, IIRC, the NATO Tracking Station at Cape Greco in Cyprus wasn't manned by the host nation but was visited occasionally by Turkish Naval officers.
 
#20
Cynic, moi?

I there was any USN support to the 'Ra in those days, I'd be tempted to look at local liaisons - smart young USN officers with Derry and Donegal Dorises, somehow they never seemed to click with their more dour equivalents in the Fountain or Coleraine - for an explanation. Don't think it (assuming it ever happened, which it didn't) was sanctioned or even known about at any level higher than, ooh, around full Commander USN level. Allegedly.
On a few occasions in 76 the ATO bar did exchange visits with theirs. I remember some pretty good nights, but we were aware that they were also very welcome at the Bog Inn. About ten years later I met one of them in Berlin and we recreated the "WB falling off his barstool" operetta.
 

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