British Infantry Battalion COs in WW1

#61
Firstly Powell wasn't the youngest brigadier in the British Army in WW2, he was 31 or 32 before he was promoted to that rank , while Mike Carver who commanded 4 Armoured Brigade from Normandy onwards was 29 when promoted . Secondly unlike Carver , Powell never commanded a brigade or any other unit or formation. I shouldn't have written brigadier earlier , I should have written brigade commander. What is true is that Enoch Powell And Fitzroy Maclean were the only men to go from private to brigadier in WW2.
My bold - that sort of comment is slightly disingenuous as they didn't pass through every rank in between.

Only Wullie managed Private to Brigadier via all the ranks and went on to Field Marshal I think.
 
#62
Here is one who went onto become a Lt General - Bernard Freyberg VC, DSO** took command of an Army brigade with the rank of Brigadier, at the age of 28. In September he was badly wounded again and did not return to duty until January 1918, subsequently being awarded two bars to his DSO, having been made a Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in 1917.
Great battalion commander, pretty good brigadier, not too bad a division commander, bad corps commander . Among the NZ senior officers Howard Kippenberger and Steve Weir were ( IMHO ) definitely better by 1943/44, but Kippenberger stepped on a mine at Cassino while acting div commander, and Weir was borrowed by the British Army to command 46 Division.

Weir, Stephen Cyril Ettrick – Dictionary of New Zealand Biography – Te Ara

Kippenberger, Howard Karl – Dictionary of New Zealand Biography – Te Ara
 
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#63
My bold - that sort of comment is slightly disingenuous as they didn't pass through every rank in between.

Only Wullie managed Private to Brigadier via all the ranks and went on to Field Marshal I think.
Indeed . It would have been impossible to do that joining up as a private soldier in 1939/40. As I wrote in my above post , both Maclean and Powell were clearly very atypical recruits- a diplomat and a classics professor- and their wartime service reflected that . Then again , Robertson ( IIRC ) never served with a line unit after the rank of captain, so also an atypical career for a regular.
 
#64
Great battalion commander, pretty good brigadier, not too bad a division commander, bad corps commander . Among the NZ senior officers Howard Kippenberger and Steve Weir were ( IMHO ) definitely better by 1943/44, but Kippenberger stepped on a mine at Cassino while acting div commander, and Weir was borrowed by the British Army to command 46 Division.
Didn't Kippenberger also loose his son in action shortly before he triped the mine?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#65
A few officers enjoyed both wars. I'm sure there is a post on a history thread and the poster asked his grand dad if he enjoyed the great war. The reply was "yeeee I f00king loved it."
I just remember that post for the apparent glee the grand dad had for it, some men love war and the chaos. Each to their own we all contribute in our own ways.
To be fair he was running QC for a field brothel.
 
#66
To be fair he was running QC for a field brothel.
Also to be fair, I personally did that myself many years later in Malacca.
Never ever did find one that failed my extremely discerning tests.
On one occasion though, I did have a heated discussion with the Red Caps on my testing methods.
 
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Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#68
Also to be fair, I personally did that myself many years later in Malacca.
Never ever did find one that failed my extremely discerning tests.
On one occasion though, I did have a heated discussion with the Red Caps on my testing methods.
Years ahead of the Black Mafia ?
 
#69
My bold - that sort of comment is slightly disingenuous as they didn't pass through every rank in between.

Only Wullie managed Private to Brigadier via all the ranks and went on to Field Marshal I think.
Troop Sgt Major never Regiment Sgt Major. Given at the time there was no WO1/2 separation we can over look every rank.
Tounge in cheek there.
If you look at the men he served with a very interesting story, one of his officers as a tom become his secretary. A true role reversal.
 
#71
You don’t have to cough sixty notes for the book.

Just hit the link in the OP and save the .pdf to iBooks, Kindle or Calibre. Job jobbed.

Isn’t it a good reflection on us as a civilised society that we can pay some gawky spod to write a thesis on Army sheds? You could argue that this is exactly what the various soldiers mentioned in this thread fought/died for.
 
#72
You don’t have to cough sixty notes for the book.

Just hit the link in the OP and save the .pdf to iBooks, Kindle or Calibre. Job jobbed.

Isn’t it a good reflection on us as a civilised society that we can pay some gawky spod to write a thesis on Army sheds? You could argue that this is exactly what the various soldiers mentioned in this thread fought/died for.
PDF on kindle can be a pain. Software out there that will convert it to the correct kindle file and to any text based file you can think of.
 
#73
You don’t have to cough sixty notes for the book.

Just hit the link in the OP and save the .pdf to iBooks, Kindle or Calibre. Job jobbed.

Isn’t it a good reflection on us as a civilised society that we can pay some gawky spod to write a thesis on Army sheds? You could argue that this is exactly what the various soldiers mentioned in this thread fought/died for.
Not a typical phd student ... a practicing psychologist in his 50s ( or thereabouts)

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#74
Troop Sgt Major never Regiment Sgt Major. Given at the time there was no WO1/2 separation we can over look every rank.
Tounge in cheek there.
If you look at the men he served with a very interesting story, one of his officers as a tom become his secretary. A true role reversal.
Not his 'secretary', Freddy Blair was Military Secretary Eastern Command - that's a bit different.
 
#75
PDF on kindle can be a pain. Software out there that will convert it to the correct kindle file and to any text based file you can think of.
Download it to Calibre on a PC and convert it to EPUB (which I presume is the preferred Kindle format). Or MOBI, wottevva.

Calibre has dozens of optional e-reader formats.
 
#76
As noted on here before, his demolition of John Mosier's appalling Myth of the Great War contains possibly the best ever opening line of any book review to appear in English Historical Review
I must have missed that thread. I bought, and enjoyed reading, Mosier's book. However, if there's a critique then I'd like to read that too. Is the EHR review online? And what where Bourne's main points?

Cheers,
Dan.
 
#78
I must have missed that thread. I bought, and enjoyed reading, Mosier's book. However, if there's a critique then I'd like to read that too. Is the EHR review online? And what where Bourne's main points?

Cheers,
Dan.
Here's Canadian historian Tim Cook, who has written some pretty good books about the Canadian experience of both wars, reviewing that yank mongs scribbling and Gary Sheffield's excellent Forgotten Victory

http://scholars.wlu.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1345&context=cmh
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#79
(As noted on here before, his demolition of John Mosier's appalling Myth of the Great War contains possibly the best ever opening line of any book review to appear in English Historical Review)
Would be a bonus if you'd quoted it.
 

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