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British Government trying to end the slave trade - in the fifties

Yokel

LE

The FCDO was heavily involved in efforts to end the slave trade, and offer assistance to escaped slaves, in the Middle East in the 1950s. Less than 70years ago, HMG was lobbying the Emir of Qatar to force him to free 3000 slaves.

I have suspiction the media will do their best to ignore this, because good news does not sell.
 
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The FCDO was heavily involved in efforts to end the slave trade, and offer assistance to escaped slaves, in the Middle East in the 1950s. Less than 70years ago, HMG was lobbying the Emir of Qatar to force him to free 3000 slaves.

I have suspiction the media will do their best to ignore this,
Wrong kind of slavery. No interest from the media or the usual suspects. Paints whitey in a good light too so doubly so.
 
I haven't read the attachments yet, but until the 1950s it was accepted that any slave who could reach the British Embassy (the old one next to Al Alam Palace) in Muscat, and clasp hands around the flagpole flying the Union Jack would be granted manumission.

Right up until the 1990s the newspapers in Oman contained a daily "Agony Imam" column during Ramadan, where pious Ibadhi Muslims could ask how to deal with the finer points of maintaining their religious duties. Quite often the answer would be to tack another voluntary day on to the end of the Ramadan period to make up for days when the proper strictures had not been followed. However, it was not in the least bit unusual for the remedy being, "Free one slave."
 
I haven't read the attachments yet, but until the 1950s it was accepted that any slave who could reach the British Embassy (the old one next to Al Alam Palace) in Muscat, and clasp hands around the flagpole flying the Union Jack would be granted manumission.

Right up until the 1990s the newspapers in Oman contained a daily "Agony Imam" column during Ramadan, where pious Ibadhi Muslims could ask how to deal with the finer points of maintaining their religious duties. Quite often the answer would be to tack another voluntary day on to the end of the Ramadan period to make up for days when the proper strictures had not been followed. However, it was not in the least bit unusual for the remedy being, "Free one slave."
While it is known that the old Sultan kept slaves but when he was overthrown in 1970 and his son Sultan Qaboos installed as leader, quoted direct from wikpedia:

In his first year in power, Qaboos also abolished slavery in Oman.
 
While it is known that the old Sultan kept slaves but when he was overthrown in 1970 and his son Sultan Qaboos installed as leader, quoted direct from wikpedia:

In his first year in power, Qaboos also abolished slavery in Oman.
Slavery continues in all but name throughout the Gulf states - the bonded labourers, the abused Filipina maids, the Bangladeshi shopworkers, the frequent construction site deaths which don't matter, and so on and so on . . . . . . . . .
 

Yokel

LE
Wrong kind of slavery. No interest from the media or the usual suspects. Paints whitey in a good light too so doubly so.

Surely the slaves were black people taken from Africa against the will and forced to do back breaking work? One of the SAS books talks of the old Sultan being attended by 'burly young men from Africa -known as slaves'.

As I suspected - no mainstream media interest.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I haven't read the attachments yet, but until the 1950s it was accepted that any slave who could reach the British Embassy (the old one next to Al Alam Palace) in Muscat, and clasp hands around the flagpole flying the Union Jack would be granted manumission.

Right up until the 1990s the newspapers in Oman contained a daily "Agony Imam" column during Ramadan, where pious Ibadhi Muslims could ask how to deal with the finer points of maintaining their religious duties. Quite often the answer would be to tack another voluntary day on to the end of the Ramadan period to make up for days when the proper strictures had not been followed. However, it was not in the least bit unusual for the remedy being, "Free one slave."
Example of the Manumission Document in this article here

Why was Britain freeing slaves in the 1960s? - Terra Nullius, by Ned Donovan (substack.com)
 

Yokel

LE
The British Government worked hard to eradicate slavery in its Gulf protectorates and allies. Kuwait declared the practice abolished in 1949, Qatar in 1952, while six of the seven Arab Emirates followed in 1956, Abu Dhabi doing the same in 1963. Saudi Arabia outlawed slavery in 1962, with the two countries that made up Yemen following shortly after.

@vvaannmmaann I must have missed the media reports approving of the good deeds of the past....
 

Yokel

LE
Still not a dicky bird from the mainstream media.. Perhaps any programmes about the improvement in how minorities have been treated should remember the role played by mainstream Western politicians and diplomats. The US Federal Government was involved in ending segregation in the United States, and Thatcher/Reagen were involved in bringing Apartheid in South Africa to an end.
 

Yokel

LE
I wonder if it would be worth sending an e-mail with a link to mainstream news outlets like the BBC and Sky? Perhaps they might be interested in this sort of thing?

Or the papers maybe? Something to think about. The early anti slavery campaigners were closely connected to classical liberal philosophy - which largely created 'The West'.
 
While it is known that the old Sultan kept slaves but when he was overthrown in 1970 and his son Sultan Qaboos installed as leader, quoted direct from wikpedia:

In his first year in power, Qaboos also abolished slavery in Oman.
By the time Mrs retread2's little boy arrived in Oman, in Nov '75, the former slaves and their descendants had become a sort of elite in Oman. They were quite visible being large, black and (usually) fat. Their tribal name (for want of a better expression) would be al-'Abd or 'the slave'. I saw them in Salalah, but not in my neck of the woods, Thamrait. They were, as far as I knew, entirely integrated into Omani society and I believe often had employment in the various palaces.
 
I haven't read the attachments yet, but until the 1950s it was accepted that any slave who could reach the British Embassy (the old one next to Al Alam Palace) in Muscat, and clasp hands around the flagpole flying the Union Jack would be granted manumission.

That sounds like a myth.
 

Yokel

LE
The flagpole in the courtyard – for a century before 1963 clasped by slaves seeking manumission – was found to be in a dangerous state when repainted by crewmen from HMS Andromeda in 1972, and was dismantled the following year: the Union Jack thereafter flew from a pole on the building.
 
No, it's true. Nearly said kosher . . .

Oman: Muscat Second sentence in 'Since 1971'.

I'm still not buying it, it sounds very much like the article is quoting a myth.

The evidence against.

Most embassies are enclosed by high walls, might not have been at the time, but generally you cant just walk around them.

If you were seeking sanctuary in an embassy, why is there some weird rule about clasping a flagpole in the British embassy? Was it a game like rugby where everyone tries to tackle you before you score?

How would the slaves know? Whacked over the head in Africa, brought to Oman to do the shit tasks and (pre internet and probably TV/newspapers for slaves) there is someone going around telling them that freedom is at the flagpole in the British Embassy?

What is going to happen to them after they have clasped the flagpole? I doubt in the late 1800s they got transport back to their country of origin, much more likely to be booted in the head by an irate security guard/cop and dragged back outside.

It just doesnt add up, it sounds like one of those "delightful" stories from the past, that arent true but are sound interesting.
 
I'm still not buying it, it sounds very much like the article is quoting a myth.

The evidence against.

Most embassies are enclosed by high walls, might not have been at the time, but generally you cant just walk around them.

If you were seeking sanctuary in an embassy, why is there some weird rule about clasping a flagpole in the British embassy? Was it a game like rugby where everyone tries to tackle you before you score?

How would the slaves know? Whacked over the head in Africa, brought to Oman to do the shit tasks and (pre internet and probably TV/newspapers for slaves) there is someone going around telling them that freedom is at the flagpole in the British Embassy?

What is going to happen to them after they have clasped the flagpole? I doubt in the late 1800s they got transport back to their country of origin, much more likely to be booted in the head by an irate security guard/cop and dragged back outside.

It just doesnt add up, it sounds like one of those "delightful" stories from the past, that arent true but are sound interesting.
Reference to it is made here:


and here:


and here:


and here:

 
Reference to it is made here:


and here:


and here:


and here:


Just repeating the same thing though arent they?

This bit (last sentence) seems relevant
1612443230959.png


Are there any stories from slaves who actually got their freedom from clasping a flag pole?
 

Yokel

LE
I looked on the BBC website and it appears that there is no way of suggesting a programme. @bigeye do you have any ideas?

I wonder about other media outlets? Or the newspapers even?

Is good news no news?
 
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