British Gas in 10% gas price cut

#1
British Gas has announced it will reduce its standard tariff gas prices by 10% from 19 February.

It said the move would benefit more than 7.5 million homes and cut £84 from the average annual gas bill.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7843999.stm

Big ******* deal. You raised them by 35% initially. How about reducing them by 25%?
 
#2
Im with EON, they are shit. £1400 last year for a 2 bed flat does not sound right to me. I can only have ONE tariff and cant move till the bil is paid. If anyone can afford it get yourself some solar panels.
 
#4
PartTimePongo said:
British Gas has announced it will reduce its standard tariff gas prices by 10% from 19 February.

It said the move would benefit more than 7.5 million homes and cut £84 from the average annual gas bill.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7843999.stm

Big ******* deal. You raised them by 35% initially. How about reducing them by 25%?
At least you've got gas. Mine got cut off for 2 weeks by the Russians!!!!
 
#5
Did you hear the British Gas CEO on Radio 4? "Well the good news is that this cut means in real terms that the average bill will be reduced by £100 a year"

Tosser. Then went into mealy mouthed "two year average" for pricing and its not our fault chat. Kind of surprises me that the average can go up by 35 % and then down by 10% all in the space of 6mths if they use that pricing model. Drown then with statistics seemed to be his discussion technique.
 
#6
in_the_cheapseats said:
Did you hear the British Gas CEO on Radio 4? "Well the good news is that this cut means in real terms that the average bill will be reduced by £100 a year"

Tosser. Then went into mealy mouthed "two year average" for pricing and its not our fault chat. Kind of surprises me that the average can go up by 35 % and then down by 10% all in the space of 6mths if they use that pricing model. Drown then with statistics seemed to be his discussion technique.
Petrol goes up tomorrow by 10% at the pumps where I am. All to do with the dinar sliding against the $ and the Euro.
 
#7
in_the_cheapseats said:
Tosser. Then went into mealy mouthed "two year average" for pricing and its not our fault chat. Kind of surprises me that the average can go up by 35 % and then down by 10% all in the space of 6mths if they use that pricing model. Drown then with statistics seemed to be his discussion technique.
See Scott Adams and Confusopolies:

Encyclopedia > Confusopoly

Scott Adams introduced the word confusopoly in his book The Dilbert Future. The word is a combination of confusion and monopoly (or rather oligopoly) and Adams defines it as "a group of companies with similar products who intentionally confuse customers instead of competing on price".

Examples of industries in which confusopolies exist (according to Adams) include telephone service, insurance, mortgage loans, banking, and financial services.

The aim is to make things so complicated customers can't tell whether they are getting a good deal or not - seems to sum up the power companies in the UK.

Rodney2q
 
#9
Rodney2q said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
Tosser. Then went into mealy mouthed "two year average" for pricing and its not our fault chat. Kind of surprises me that the average can go up by 35 % and then down by 10% all in the space of 6mths if they use that pricing model. Drown then with statistics seemed to be his discussion technique.
See Scott Adams and Confusopolies:

Encyclopedia > Confusopoly

Scott Adams introduced the word confusopoly in his book The Dilbert Future. The word is a combination of confusion and monopoly (or rather oligopoly) and Adams defines it as "a group of companies with similar products who intentionally confuse customers instead of competing on price".

Examples of industries in which confusopolies exist (according to Adams) include telephone service, insurance, mortgage loans, banking, and financial services.

The aim is to make things so complicated customers can't tell whether they are getting a good deal or not - seems to sum up the power companies in the UK.

Rodney2q
Rodney,

Thanks. A good word to remember.

ITC
 
#10
Just watched Phil Bentley in action on BBC24. Confusology was in full effect.

What exactly are the benefits Mr. Bentley? From what I can see, fixed price tariff customers will be subsidising this 'discount'

It's all about maintaining profit levels while appearing to actually do something isnt it Mr. Bentley? Why not just call yourselves Centrica Bank?
 
#11
I believe that gas prices will go lower and lower. Now Ukraine significantly bounded internal consumption that is about 75% of UK level. So Gazprom has additional opportunity to pump more gas to the EU countries. It looks like Gazprom affiliated firms could propose very attractive prices on British market.
 
#12
KGB_resident said:
I believe that gas prices will go lower and lower. Now Ukraine significantly bounded internal consumption that is about 75% of UK level. So Gazprom has additional opportunity to pump more gas to the EU countries. It looks like Gazprom affiliated firms could propose very attractive prices on British market.
There is a matter of trust, Sergey. With you switching the supply on and off and UK's minimal storage facilities, I suspect the UK will be going to a more trustworthy supplier for as much of its supply as it can get.

Norway springs to mind.....

No-one likes being held hostage and Russia has pulled this trick twice now. This last little fiasco proves that you are willing to do it again and bugger the consequences. That to me is in unacceptable behaviour by a nation state. I think you should remain a supplier of last resort, even if you is prepared to drop its prices in desperation, at the very least until we have the ability to hold adequate stock. That, for the UK, is years away.
 
#13
in_the_cheapseats said:
KGB_resident said:
I believe that gas prices will go lower and lower. Now Ukraine significantly bounded internal consumption that is about 75% of UK level. So Gazprom has additional opportunity to pump more gas to the EU countries. It looks like Gazprom affiliated firms could propose very attractive prices on British market.
There is a matter of trust, Sergey. With you switching the supply on and off and UK's minimal storage facilities, I suspect the UK will be going to a more trustworthy supplier for as much of its supply as it can get.

Norway springs to mind.....

No-one likes being held hostage and Russia has pulled this trick twice now. This last little fiasco proves that you are willing to do it again and bugger the consequences. That to me is in unacceptable behaviour by a nation state. I think you should remain a supplier of last resort, even if you is prepared to drop its prices in desperation, at the very least until we have the ability to hold adequate stock. That, for the UK, is years away.
Of course, if you would not pay on time agreed price then gas taps would be closed. But if Russia would stop to pump gas then it would not get money. Fair play.

As for Norway then it hasn't enough gas for whole Europe. Now many European countries would prefer to contract as much Norwegian gas as possible. So I fear the UK would not get additional gas from Norway.

Moreover, Norway could change the formula for gas price. It could add 'ecological' component - something like 10-20% (gas is more ecologically friendly than oil). Likely Russia would follow this example.
 
#14
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
KGB_resident said:
I believe that gas prices will go lower and lower. Now Ukraine significantly bounded internal consumption that is about 75% of UK level. So Gazprom has additional opportunity to pump more gas to the EU countries. It looks like Gazprom affiliated firms could propose very attractive prices on British market.
There is a matter of trust, Sergey. With you switching the supply on and off and UK's minimal storage facilities, I suspect the UK will be going to a more trustworthy supplier for as much of its supply as it can get.

Norway springs to mind.....

No-one likes being held hostage and Russia has pulled this trick twice now. This last little fiasco proves that you are willing to do it again and bugger the consequences. That to me is in unacceptable behaviour by a nation state. I think you should remain a supplier of last resort, even if you is prepared to drop its prices in desperation, at the very least until we have the ability to hold adequate stock. That, for the UK, is years away.
Of course, if you would not pay on time agreed price then gas taps would be closed. But if Russia would stop to pump gas then it would not get money. Fair play.

As for Norway then it hasn't enough gas for whole Europe. Now many European countries would prefer to contract as much Norwegian gas as possible. So I fear the UK would not get additional gas from Norway.

Moreover, Norway could change the formula for gas price. It could add 'ecological' component - something like 10-20% (gas is more ecologically friendly than oil). Likely Russia would follow this example.
To your points.

No other nation other than Ukraine was behind in payment but everyone suffered? Russia cares about its customers then? I think not. The brute stick approach is /was an ignorant one.

I agree that Norway doesn't have supply enough for all but I coached my words carefully. We will get as much as we possibly can before coming to you and we are a lot closer to Norway than you for export purposes.

As to your ecological comment - so what? As you say, if one does it all will therefore it is a null point
 
#15
carlbcfc said:
Im with EON, they are s***. £1400 last year for a 2 bed flat does not sound right to me. I can only have ONE tariff and cant move till the bil is paid. If anyone can afford it get yourself some solar panels.
I'm with EON as well and I'm in full agreement. They've just informed me that my Direct Debit is going up by 50% to £48 p/m for a new build one bed apartment that I'm only ever in at weekends-how the fcuk can my bill be that much?
 
#16
in_the_cheapseats said:
To your points.

No other nation other than Ukraine was behind in payment but everyone suffered?
I believe that Russia sisncerely regrets that it happened. Innocent civilians were killed in Yugoslavia, in Iraq, in Afghanistan. I believe that Washington and London sincerely regret that it has happened as well.

Sometimes it is impossible to avoid side effects.

in_the_cheapseats said:
Russia cares about its customers then? I think not.
...and I agree. Russia cares about own interests. Would you say that the EU cares about Russia's interests? No, I suppose.

in_the_cheapseats said:
The brute stick approach is /was an ignorant one.
I like this quote very much

http://www.moscowtimes.ru/article/1016/42/373749.htm

When a country is able to get anything it wants from its partners because they are weak, I wouldn't call it hooliganism. It is a rational business and political strategy.
in_the_cheapseats said:
I agree that Norway doesn't have supply enough for all but I coached my words carefully. We will get as much as we possibly can before coming to you and we are a lot closer to Norway than you for export purposes.
More players on the gas market - lower the price.
 
#17
the_matelot said:
carlbcfc said:
Im with EON, they are s***. £1400 last year for a 2 bed flat does not sound right to me. I can only have ONE tariff and cant move till the bil is paid. If anyone can afford it get yourself some solar panels.
I'm with EON as well and I'm in full agreement. They've just informed me that my Direct Debit is going up by 50% to £48 p/m for a new build one bed apartment that I'm only ever in at weekends-how the fcuk can my bill be that much?
Estimated bills? They really crank on the money if they don't have to read a meter.
 
#18
No doubt I'll get the excess back but that's not the point. I want the surplus earning money in MY account, not theirs.

[/Rant over]
 
#19
PartTimePongo said:
the_matelot said:
carlbcfc said:
Im with EON, they are s***. £1400 last year for a 2 bed flat does not sound right to me. I can only have ONE tariff and cant move till the bil is paid. If anyone can afford it get yourself some solar panels.
I'm with EON as well and I'm in full agreement. They've just informed me that my Direct Debit is going up by 50% to £48 p/m for a new build one bed apartment that I'm only ever in at weekends-how the fcuk can my bill be that much?
Estimated bills? They really crank on the money if they don't have to read a meter.
If you are with British Gas, then you can submit your actual meter readings. This can even be done afrer you have received a bill and a corrected bill is then sent out.

https://www.britishgas.co.uk/MeterRead/Anonymous_Account_Details/Entry/?WT.seg_3=i100126

As there is very rarely anyone home during the day when meter readers call, I go one further and submit my meter readings at the 13-week point (i.e. 52/4).

You can do it with EON too:

https://www.eonenergy.com/At-Home/ExistingCustomers/Meter-Readings/

NPower too:

https://www.npower.com/At_home/Forms2/CustomerService/MeterRead.aspx?workflow=MeterRead
 
#20
PartTimePongo said:
the_matelot said:
carlbcfc said:
Im with EON, they are s***. £1400 last year for a 2 bed flat does not sound right to me. I can only have ONE tariff and cant move till the bil is paid. If anyone can afford it get yourself some solar panels.
I'm with EON as well and I'm in full agreement. They've just informed me that my Direct Debit is going up by 50% to £48 p/m for a new build one bed apartment that I'm only ever in at weekends-how the fcuk can my bill be that much?
Estimated bills? They really crank on the money if they don't have to read a meter.
Always found it was a nightmare trying to get overpaid money back from them usual excuse oh we will just dectuct the amount your owed from your next bill. You had to fight them tooth and nail for the money back always it's not company policy to send cheques got it back in the end but low and behold next bill would be more than you expected....surprised I wasn't
 

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