British files: Nazis ‘shipped arms to Palestinians’

#1
Nazis ‘shipped arms to Palestinians’

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3248081,00.html

British National Archives unveil presence of Nazi S.S. agents in Mandatory Palestine, working closely with Palestinian leaders
Yaakov Lappin

Historical documents in Britain’s National Archives in London show that Nazi Germany attempted to ship arms to Palestinian forces in the 1930s.

A British Foreign Office report from 1939 reports of “news of a consignment of arms from Germany, sent via Turkey and addressed to Ibn Saud (king of Saudi Arabia), but really intended for the Palestine insurgents.” Britain’s chief military officer in Mandatory Palestine also noted reports “regarding import of German arms at intervals for some years now.”

British documents from the same period, and German records photographed by an American spy and sent to the British government, said that a number of Nazi agents were sent to Mandatory Palestine, in order to forge alliances with Palestinian leaders, and urge them to reject a partition of the land between the Jewish and Arab populations.

One Nazi agent, Adam Vollhardt, arrived in Palestine in July 1938, and was reported to have gained strong influence with Arab leaders, meeting with Palestinian leaders throughout 1938. Vollhardt held several meetings with leading Arab politicians and told them “that the Palestine question would be settled to the satisfaction of the Arabs within a few weeks,” adding that “it would be fatal to their (Palestinians’) cause if at this juncture they showed any signs of weakness or exhaustion.”

“Germany was interested in the settlement of the (Palestine) question on the basis of the Arabs obtaining their full demands,” Vollhardt was reported to say to Palestinian leaders, according to a report by the British War Office. Vollhardt also assured Arab leaders that “the Germans could continue to support the Palestinian Arab cause by means of propaganda.”

German documents photographed and sent to Whitehall by an American spy revealed that in 1937, German officials had calculated that “Palestine under Arab rule would… become one of the few countries where we could count on a strong sympathy for the new Germany.”


‘Arabs admire our Fuhrer’

“The Palestinian Arabs show on all levels a great sympathy for the new Germany and its Fuhrer, a sympathy whose value is particularly
high as it is based on a purely ideological foundation,” a Nazi official in Palestine wrote in a letter to Berlin in 1937. He added: “Most important for the sympathies which Arabs now feel towards Germany is their admiration for our Fuhrer, especially during the unrests, I often had an opportunity to see how far these sympathies extend. When faced with a dangerous behaviour of an Arab mass, when one said that one was German, this was already generally a free pass.”

A second Nazi agent, Dr. Franz Reichart, was reported to be actively working with Palestinian Arabs by the British Criminal Investigation Division “to help coordinate Arab and German propaganda.” Reichart was also head of the German Telegraphic Agency in Jerusalem.

German records show that the Nazis viewed the establishment of a Jewish state with great concern. A 1937 report from German General Consulate in Palestine said: “The formation of a Jewish state… is not in Germany’s interest because a (Jewish) Palestinian state would create additional national power bases for international Jewry such as for example the Vatican State for political Catholicism or Moscow for the Communists. Therefore, there is a German interest in strengthening the Arabs as a counter weight against such possible power growth of the Jews.”


Jewish refugees abandoned

The records also show that the news of increased Nazi-Arab cooperation panicked the British government, and caused it to cancel a plan in 1938 to bring to Palestine 20,000 German Jewish refugees, half of them children, facing danger from the Nazis.

Documents show that after deciding that the move would upset Arab opinion, Britain decided to abandon the Jewish refugees to their fate.

“His Majesty’s Government asked His Majesty’s Representatives in Cairo, Baghdad and Jeddah whether so far as they could judge, feelings in Egypt, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia against the admission of, say 5,000 Jewish children for adoption… would be so strong as to lead to a refusal to send representatives to the London discussions. All three replies were strongly against the proposal, which was not proceeded with,” a Foreign Office report said.

“If war were to break out, no trouble that the Jews could occasion us, in Palestine or elsewhere, could weigh for a moment against the importance of winning Muslim opinion to our side,” Britain’s Minister for Coordination of Defence, Lord Chatfield, told the British cabinet in 1939, shortly before Britain reversed its decision to partition its mandate, promising instead all of the land to the Palestinian Arabs.
"At the Nuremberg Trials, Eichmann's deputy Dieter Wisliceny (subsequently executed as a war criminal) testified:

The [Grand Mufti (of Jerusalem) Haj Amin al-Husseini] was one of the initiators of the systematic extermination of European Jewry and had been a collaborator and adviser of Eichmann and Himmler in the execution of this plan. ... He was one of Eichmann's best friends and had constantly incited him to accelerate the extermination measures. I heard him say, accompanied by Eichmann, he had visited incognito the gas chamber of Auschwitz."


The Nazis were always looking for military alliances against Great Britain."
"Now that the German archives are open, we know that within weeks of Hitler’s coming to power in 1933, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem got in touch with the German consul general in Jerusalem, Doctor Heinrich Wolff, and offered his services. It is interesting that the common image of the Germans pursuing the Arabs is the reverse of what happened. The Arabs were pursuing the Germans, and the Germans were very reluctant to get involved. Dr. Wolff recommended, and his government agreed, that as long as there was any hope of making a deal with the British Empire and establishing a kind of Aryan-Nordic axis in the West, it would be pointless to antagonize the British by supporting the Arabs.

But then things gradually changed, particularly after the Munich Conference in 1938. That was the turning point, when the German government finally decided that there was no deal to be made with Britain, no Aryan axis. Then the Germans turned their attention more seriously to the Arabs, responding at last to their approaches, and from then on the relationship developed very swiftly.

In 1940 the French surrender gave the Nazis new opportunities for action in the Arab world. In Vichy-controlled Syria they were able for a while to establish an intelligence and propaganda base in the heart of the Arab East. From Syria they extended their activities to Iraq, where they helped to establish a pro-Nazi regime headed by Rashid Ali al-Gailani. This was overthrown by the British, and Rashid Ali went to join his friend the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem in Berlin, where he remained as Hitler’s guest until the end of the war. In the last days of Rashid Ali’s regime, on the first and second of June 1941, soldiers and civilians launched murderous attacks on the ancient Jewish community in Baghdad. This was followed by a series of such attacks in other Arab cities, both in the Middle East and in North Africa."

Bernard Lewis, The American Scholar - Volume 75 No. 1 Winter 2006 pp. 25-36

The Independent (London)

April 14, 2006 Friday

'Hitler's holocaust plan for Jews in Palestine stopped by Desert Rats'

By Allan Hall in Berlin

Adolf Hitler made plans to conduct a holocaust of Jews living in Palestine during the Second World War, according to German historians who have examined government archives for a new book that examines the extension of the extermination programme outside of Europe and Russia.

It was the victory of the famed Desert Rats of Britain's Eighth Army at El Alamein under the leadership of Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery that saved the Jews in Palestine from annihilation. The turning point in the desert war signalled a reprieve from a planned German invasion of what was then the British Mandate of Palestine.

If Arabs had joined Nazis in genocide, the map of the Middle East could be totally different to present day and the historians speculate whether the state of Israel would ever have been founded if such an unholy alliance had been achieved.

The Nazis stationed a unit of SS troops in Athens, tasked with following invading frontline troops in Palestine and then rounding up and murdering about 500,000 European Jews who had taken refuge there, according to historians at the University of Stuttgart.

But the unit, answerable to the Afrika Corps under Field Marshal Erwin "The Desert Fox" Rommel, never deployed.

It was designed to function like the Einsatzgruppen or "action squads" of the SS that followed the German army into Russia, shooting close to a million Jews and political enemies before the static killing centres such as Treblinka and Auschwitz were established in Poland.

Klaus-Michael Mallmann of the University's Ludwigsburg research team and his assistant Martin Cuppers said they had spent three years studying German wartime archives, including those at the foreign office in Berlin which had hitherto remained sealed.

"The Allied defeat of Rommel at the end of 1942 had prevented the extension of the Holocaust to Palestine," they said. If Rommel had beaten the Allies in the desert and invaded Egypt, a push into Palestine would have followed and the unit would have deployed there.

The researchers, whose findings appear in a new book entitled Germans, Jews, Genocide: The Holocaust as history and the present, said the Athens unit would follow the blueprint drawn by Nazi units that hunted for Jews in eastern Europe, massacring them on the spot or shipping them off to death camps. In Palestine, they say, it would have been more of the former than the latter due to the greater distances involved.

Mr Mallmann and Mr Cuppers said the Nazis had planned to exploit Arab friendship for their plans.

"The most important collaborator with the Nazis and an absolute Arab anti-Semite was Haj Amin al-Husseini, the mufti of Jerusalem," they say in the book. He was a prime example of how Arabs and Nazis became friends out of a hatred of Jews.

Al-Husseini had met Adolf Eichmann, Adolf Hitler's chief architect of the Holocaust, several times to settle details of the slaughter. In the academic work they draw on documents from the Reich Main Security Office showing "Einsatzgruppe Egypt" was standing by in Athens and was ready to disembark for Palestine in the summer of 1942.

The Middle East death squad was to be led by the SS Obersturmbannfuhrer Walther Rauff.

Rauff was involved in the development of "gassing vans": mobile gas chambers used to fatally poison Jews, persons with disabilities, and communists, who were considered by the SS as enemies of the German state.

After escaping from an American internment camp in Italy after capture, he hid in a number of Italian convents, apparently under the protection of Bishop Alois Hudel, the notorious German cleric at the Vatican credited with providing fake papers for high-ranking Nazis to escape to South America.

Franz Stangl, commandant of Treblinka, where a million people were murdered, was among his "clients." In 1948 he was recruited by Syrian intelligence and went to Damascus, only to fall out of favour after a coup there a year later. He settled in Chile, where he fought off extradition proceedings to stand trial in Germany and died peacefully in 1984. He hinted at plans to kill the Jews in Palestine in an interview in 1979, in which he was unrepentant about his wartime "service to my Fatherland".
Of all the Arabs convinced of Hitler's coming triumph, none was so eager as Haj Amin al-Husseini, the acknowledged leader of the Palestinian Arab cause and the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini, who had fled from Palestine to Iraq to exile in Berlin where he led the "Arab office," met with Hitler whom he called "the Protector of Islam," served the Germans in Bosnia where he was instrumental in raising Muslim volunteers among the Bosnians to work with the SS. At the end of the war, the Yugoslav government declared him a war criminal. Palestinian Arabs still regard him as a heroic leader. Lending active support to the Arab war effort were Falangist volunteers from Franco's Spain, Bosnian Muslims and Nazi renegades who had escaped the Allies in Europe.

July 18, 2002, 8:45 a.m.
Their Kampf
Hitler’s book in Arab hands.

By David Pryce-Jones

The Third Reich and the Arab East, by Lukasz Hirszowicz, a Polish-born scholar, was published almost 40 years ago but remains a definitive work. It examines in careful detail how Hitler's Germany sought to woo Arabs through anti-British and anti-Jewish policies. Nazi personalities like Josef Goebbels and Baldur von Schirach of the Hitler Youth carried out goodwill tours. Various German agents financed and armed clandestine Arab fascist groups. The first Arabic translation of Mein Kampf appeared in 1938, and Hitler himself tactfully proposed to omit from it his "racial ladder" theory.

Of all the Arabs convinced of Hitler's coming triumph, none was so eager as Haj Amin al-Husseini, the grand mufti of Jerusalem and leader of the Palestinian Arabs in the Hitler years. Vincent Sheean, the Thomas L. Friedman of the day, thought that Haj Amin had "great gifts." Along the lines that "my enemy's enemy is my friend," Haj Amin converted the Palestinian cause into a local branch of Hitler's worldwide anti-Jewish persecution. Fleeing from the British, he spent the war in Berlin. A friend and admirer of Himmler's, he raised a division of Bosnian Muslims for the SS. Hitler made grandiose promises to him, but was cautious enough to add that they could be met only after victory.
The Nazis were always looking for military alliances against Great Britain."

"Now that the German archives are open, we know that within weeks of Hitler’s coming to power in 1933, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem got in touch with the German consul general in Jerusalem, Doctor Heinrich Wolff, and offered his services. It is interesting that the common image of the Germans pursuing the Arabs is the reverse of what happened. The Arabs were pursuing the Germans, and the Germans were very reluctant to get involved. Dr. Wolff recommended, and his government agreed, that as long as there was any hope of making a deal with the British Empire and establishing a kind of Aryan-Nordic axis in the West, it would be pointless to antagonize the British by supporting the Arabs.

Bernard Lewis, The American Scholar - Volume 75 No. 1 Winter 2006 pp. 25-36


http://www.pmw.org.il/LatestBulletins.htm#b240506

Hamas newspaper boasts:
Hitler called Palestinians model revolutionaries
Overview:
The admiration of Hitler among Palestinians

By Itamar Marcus and Barbara Crook, May 24, 2006

The Hamas newspaper this week chronicled with pride the ways in which different foreign leaders singled out the Palestinians as examples of ideal revolutionaries. The first leader cited by the Hamas weekly, Al-Rissala, for praising the Palestinians was Adolf Hitler:

"Adolf Hitler, while exciting the Germans of the Sudetenland - the Sudetenland is a German province that the Allies had annexed to Czechoslovakia after the First World War - told them in his broadcasts: Look at what the Palestinian revolutionaries are doing to Great Britain!!"
[Al-Rissala (Hamas Weekly), May 18, 2006]

Overview: Admiration of Hitler in the Palestinian Authority:

It may be surprising to Western observers to see Palestinians taking pride in having been praised by Hitler. But it is important to understand that the utter revulsion of Hitler expected in the West is not true in Palestinian society. Palestinians can be found who are named "Hitler" as a first name: Hitler Salah [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Sept. 28, 2005], Hitler Abu-Alrab [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Jan. 27, 2005], Hitler Mahmud Abu-Libda [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Dec.18, 2000].

This phenomenon of Palestinians being named after Hitler was explained in an article in the official PA daily praising the rewriting of history and the doing of "justice" to Hitler:

"Even Adolf Hitler, who after the fall of Nazi Germany turned into a political horror for most of the writers and artists, during the last decades has started to return himself to his part of the picture. There are some in Britain who defended Hitler and tried to do justice for him. There are elderly people, among them Arabs, who still carry the name Hitler since their fathers, who were charmed by him, linked them [their children] with his name."
[Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, April 13, 2000]

One article explained the phenomenon of naming Palestinians after admired foreign leaders - such as Napoleon and the Nazi General Rommel:

"Sometimes parents name their children with foreign names, due to the father's admiration to a foreign personality. This is the source of the names: Rommel [famous Nazi General] and Napoleon."
[Al-Ayyam, November 15, 2001 "Woman's Voice" supplement].

The admiration for Hitler is consistent with the status of Mein Kampf, which a PA daily cited as a book on the best sellers' list.
[Al Hayat Al Jadida, Sept. 2, 1999].

The Third Reich and the Arab East

A slew of racists, radicals, and Islamists share a frame of mind that the West is selfishly conspiring against them, with the Jews once again secretly in charge. Catering to such people since the early '60s, editions of Mein Kampf have been put out in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia, and it is reported to be a bestseller in the Palestinian Authority area. It is available in London stores selling Arabic books.

But if really Hitler and his henchmen are role models to be imitated, then it is confused and confusing that Arab media regularly publish articles and cartoons caricaturing Israelis as Nazis, twisting the Star of David into a swastika, and so on. In today's Muslim and Arab world, Hitler and the Holocaust are labels bandied about without regard to historical truth, in order to promote hatred on the one hand, and self-pity on the other — twin signals of intellectual and moral failure.

The Third Reich and the Arab East, by Lukasz Hirszowicz, a Polish-born scholar, was published almost 40 years ago but remains a definitive work. It examines in careful detail how Hitler's Germany sought to woo Arabs through anti-British and anti-Jewish policies. Nazi personalities like Josef Goebbels and Baldur von Schirach of the Hitler Youth carried out goodwill tours. Various German agents financed and armed clandestine Arab fascist groups. The first Arabic translation of Mein Kampf appeared in 1938, and Hitler himself tactfully proposed to omit from it his "racial ladder" theory.

Of all the Arabs convinced of Hitler's coming triumph, none was so eager as Haj Amin al-Husseini, the grand mufti of Jerusalem and leader of the Palestinian Arabs in the Hitler years. Vincent Sheean, the Thomas L. Friedman of the day, thought that Haj Amin had "great gifts." Along the lines that "my enemy's enemy is my friend," Haj Amin converted the Palestinian cause into a local branch of Hitler's worldwide anti-Jewish persecution. Fleeing from the British, he spent the war in Berlin. A friend and admirer of Himmler's, he raised a division of Bosnian Muslims for the SS. Hitler made grandiose promises to him, but was cautious enough to add that they could be met only after victory.

Fanaticism had led Haj Amin into utter delusion. Hitler, the expected savior, had in reality the settled conviction that Arabs were Untermenschen and he had no intention of doing them any favors. On that racial ladder of his, Arabs occupied a servile place, held in much the same contempt as the Jews. All sorts of Arab leaders were to follow Haj Amin's example and fall into the racist trap Hitler set for them, including Gamal Abdul Nasser and Anwar Sadat, the Syrian and Iraqi Baathists, and King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia.


The Rescue of the Mufti

"We hate France—it is the enemy of Islam and religion because it is governed by atheists and Jews." Thus spoke one Arab nationalist propagandist among many on Mussolini's Radio Rome in 1938. Along similar lines, a tract distributed throughout North Africa contained the words: "The Jew feeds on you [Arabs] as vermin feed on sheep; France protects him; he is the agent of France, the tool of France. Germany is arresting and persecuting Jews and confiscating their possessions. If you weren't the slaves of France, you could do the same."

The collapse of France in 1940 and its subsequent occupation by Germany exhausted the country's moral and political authority as an imperial power. Although, as leader of the Free French, General de Gaulle would make a speech promising independence to French colonies and mandates in the Middle East, this was a promise he evidently had no intention of keeping any time soon. Nevertheless, Arab nationalists in North Africa and the Levant saw themselves as having been invited to rebel and seize power.

On May 8, 1945, the day marking Allied victory in Europe, Algerians rioted in the provincial town of Setif. Over 100 French people were killed, and as many injured. In the reprisals that followed, at least 6,000 Algerians died. At the same time, law and order broke down in Syria and Lebanon. Over 400 Syrians were killed, and the parliament in Damascus was destroyed. British forces temporarily stationed in Syria and Lebanon as a result of the war ordered the much weaker French units back to their barracks, in effect negating French rule and handing independence to both countries. In the National Assembly, the French foreign minister Georges Bidault warned the British with a Latin tag: "Hodie mihi, cras tibi"—today me, tomorrow you.

That same May, Haj Amin al-Husseini, the notorious mufti of Jerusalem, along with his staff of some sixteen aides and the officer assigned to him by the Nazi Gestapo, left what had been German-occupied Silesia and fled to Switzerland. Denied asylum there, he and his entourage found themselves in the hands of the French authorities.

Haj Amin had been responsible for rejecting any notion of partitioning Palestine between Arabs and Jews, and for precipitating the Arab revolt of 1936 in which many British personnel as well as Jews and Arabs had been killed. With French connivance, he had escaped in 1938 to Lebanon, going on to participate in the 1941 anti-British coup in Iraq before finally fleeing to Berlin. Wartime photographs show him in his clerical robes and turban in the company of Hitler, Goebbels, Himmler, and Eichmann, both privately and at public occasions, including a tour of Auschwitz. After the Allies invaded North Africa in November 1942 and the Germans took over Vichy France, Haj Amin urged Hitler to exploit the local populations of both places in order to break "the Judeo-Anglo-Saxon stranglehold." He also recruited a Bosnian Muslim division for the SS, an act for which the Americans, the British, and the Yugoslavs wanted him extradited as a war criminal.

On May 11, 1945, the ministry of the interior briefed the Quai d'Orsay that Haj Amin was considered "the brains of German espionage in all Muslim countries." The next day, the French embassy in Cairo confirmed what was to become policy. "The mufti has certainly betrayed the Allied cause," the telegram ran. "But he has above all betrayed Britain without affecting us directly. Seemingly, therefore, nothing obliges us to undertake any action in his regard that could harm us in the Arab countries." The main point was that Haj Amin held the future of Palestine in his hands at a time when "the problem of Palestine remains open."

On May 18, in a note marked "Urgent," Jean Chauvel, now secretary general of the Quai d'Orsay, confirmed to the minister of war that Haj Amin was "capable of imposing himself on the Muslim community." By May 23 Chauvel had informed the relevant embassies that "in spite of the very heavy accusations weighing against him, Haj Amin is to be treated with consideration." The reason given was his "religious prestige." An unsigned note of May 30, apparently in Chauvel's handwriting, asserts that "at the moment when [British] policy . . . is tending to throw us completely out of Syria, we must make use of the strong personality who has fallen into our hands and above all refuse to deliver him to our English friends."

Haj Amin was housed in a villa in the Paris suburbs. With him were two secretaries and a cook supplied by the Paris mosque. The Quai d'Orsay's go-between, Henri Ponsot, a former high commissioner and ambassador in Syria, was impressed by the mufti's "certain air of dignity and aristocratic grace," as well as by his intellect and his correct French. As for war crimes, Haj Amin claimed that he knew nothing about extermination camps and had never heard of "Karl Hichman" (Ponsot's garbled version of Adolf Eichmann). Approvingly, Ponsot passed on Haj Amin's view that, since Britain was unable "to break loose from the influence that the Jewish world exercised on its politics," France and the Arab states should come to an accord to settle the future of both Syria and Palestine. What Haj Amin offered, Ponsot reported on June 26, was either a "positive" collaboration, in return for which he promised to calm the general Arab agitation concerning Syria, or, almost as good, a "negative" collaboration, in which case he would provoke crises in Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, and Transjordan "to the benefit of our own policy." (These words of Ponsot's are lightly scratched out on the document.)

At the end of July, Haj Amin was moved into a comfortable country house where he could receive visitors, walk in the park under supervision, and visit Paris, where the couturier Lanvin cut him a civilian suit. The documents hint at financial and material help in an atmosphere of growing good will. Reporting on August 14 to the Quai d'Orsay on a visit to the mufti, Louis Massignon, France's most distinguished Orientalist scholar, could not resist confiding that they had spoken Arabic together and that he had addressed the mufti as "za'imnaa," our leader. Haj Amin, Massignon wrote, "is persuaded that he can launch a durable Franco-Arab cooperation," and had asked permission to meet Arab diplomats since "time was pressing, if the Zionists attack."

Already there was talk in the ministry of letting Haj Amin go free. Should the British insist on having him brought to trial, Chauvel commented in October, "we should probably be obliged to have the party slip directly into Switzerland." In April 1946, the French press published an officially inspired announcement that the government would not prevent Haj Amin's departure to an Arab country. Taking the hint, he left Orly airport on a TWA flight to Cairo. Under the name of a retainer who had been with him in Nazi Germany, and wearing his new Lanvin suit, he traveled on a false Syrian passport. Once in Cairo he held regular interviews with members of the French legation there, who praised his "quite particular interest in French cultural activity" while also expressing certain reservations about his trustworthiness.

On October 11, Haj Amin declared his official thanks to the French government for its hospitality and its tacit approval of his escape. In a secret annex, he reiterated a favorite theme: the British and American governments were in the hands of the Jews, just as had been the case in Germany, "where, thanks to the natural simplicity of the leaders, the Jews prior to Hitler had taken hold of all the commanding reins." Now, he told the French, there was a chance for "your civilization, your spirituality, and your liberalism" to bring about an accord with the Arabs.

From Cairo, Haj Amin went to Lebanon. Still in touch with French officials, he did his best to orchestrate his "negative" policy of violence against the emerging state of Israel, a policy that extended the ruin of the Palestinian Arabs and has bedeviled the Middle East ever since.


http://www.benadorassociates.com/article/15043
image
http://www.shalomjerusalem.com/mohammedism/1941December15_2.jpg

At the eve of the "final solution" to the "Jewish Problem",
the Mufti (Yasser Arafat's father's brother) and Adolf Hitler confer
in Berlin, November 21, 1941

http://www.eretzyisroel.org/~jkatz/nazis.html


In 1943, Amin Al Husseini heads the Hanzar Division of Nazi Muslims.
It was Hitler's largest SS Division and was responsible for the genocide
of Serbians, Gypsies and Jews. It lies at the root of today's unrest in Serbia/Bosnia-Hercegovina/Croatia.


Historical Background

Pre- and during WWII

Grand Mufti Haj Muhammed Amin al-Husseini with Hitler.

According to documentation from the Nuremberg and Eichmann's trials, the Nazi Germany SS helped finance al-Husseini's efforts in the 1936-1939 revolt in Palestine. Adolf Eichmann actually visited Palestine and met with al-Husseini at that time and subsequently maintained regular contact with him later in Berlin. In 1940, al-Husseini requested the Axis powers to acknowledge the Arab right "... to settle the question of Jewish elements in Palestine and other Arab countries in accordance with the national and racial interests of the Arabs and along the lines similar to those used to solve the Jewish question in Germany and Italy."

While in Baghdad, Syria, al-Husseini aided the pro-Nazi revolt of 1941. He then spent the rest of World War II as Hitler's special guest in Berlin, advocating the extermination of Jews in radio broadcasts back to the Middle East and recruiting Balkan Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina (the Handschar Division) and Albania (Skanderbeg Division) and smaller units from throughout the Muslim world from Chechnya to Uzbekistan as the German army SS units that tried to wipe out Jewish communities throughout the region. His Arab Legions later participated in the massacres of thousands of partisan Serbs, Jews and Gypsies. This was only taking the first step in Heinrich Himmler's planned grand alliance between Nazi Germany and the Islamic world. One of his closest aides, Obergruppenfhrer Gottlob Berger, boasted that "a link is created between Islam and National Socialism on an open, honest basis. It will be directed in terms of blood and race from the North, and in the ideological-spiritual sphere from the East." The Nazis provided Al Husseini with luxurious accommodations in Berlin and a monthly stipend in excess of $10,000. In return, he regularly appeared on German radio touting the Jews as the "most fierce enemies of Muslims," and implored an adoption of the Nazi "final solution" by Arabs. After the Nazi defeat at El Alamein in 1942, al-Husseini broadcast radio messages on Radio Berlin calling for continued Arabic resistance to Allied forces. In time, he came to be known as the "Fhrer's Mufti" and the "Arab Fhrer". In the annual protest against the Balfour Declaration held in 1943 at the Luftwaffe hall in Berlin, the Mufti praised the Germans because they "know how to get rid of the Jews, and that brings us close to the Germans and sets us in their camp is that, up to today." Echoing Muhammad after the battle of Badr, on March 1, 1944 the Mufti called in a broadcast from Berlin:

"Arabs! Rise as one and fight for your sacred rights. Kill the Jews wherever you find them. This pleases God, history and religion. This saves your honor."

At the Nuremberg Trials, Eichmann's deputy Dieter Wisliceny (subsequently executed as a war criminal) testified:

"The Mufti was one of the initiators of the systematic extermination of European Jewry and had been a collaborator and adviser of Eichmann and Himmler in the execution of this plan. ... He was one of Eichmann's best friends and had constantly incited him to accelerate the extermination measures. I heard him say, accompanied by Eichmann, he had visited incognito the gas chamber of Auschwitz." With the collapse of Nazi Germany in 1945, the Mufti moved to Egypt where he was received as a national hero. After the war al-Husseini was indicted by Yugoslavia for war crimes, but escaped prosecution. The Mufti was never tried because the Allies were afraid of the storm in the Arab world if the hero of Arab nationalism was treated as a war criminal.


Grand Mufti Haj Muhammed Amin al-Husseini with Hitler

Click Image to Play Video

Amin Al Husseini spent World War II in Berlin at Hitler's side. Husseini established a division of Muslim Nazis "the Hanzar" division and played a first-hand role in instigating the genocide of Europe's Jews, Serbs and Gypsies. After World War II, he actively recruited Nazi officers into the Arab governments of the Middle East. Yasser Arafat became the disciple of Amin Al Husseini at the age of 17.

In time, he came to be known as the "Fhrer's Mufti" and the "Arab Fhrer". In the annual protest against the Balfour Declaration held in 1943 at the Luftwaffe hall in Berlin, the Mufti praised the Germans because they "know how to get rid of the Jews, and that brings us close to the Germans and sets us in their camp is that, up to today." Echoing Muhammad after the battle of Badr, on March 1, 1944 the Mufti called in a broadcast from Berlin:


"Arabs! Rise as one and fight for your sacred rights. Kill the Jews wherever you find them. This pleases God, history and religion. This saves your honor."

http://img274.imageshack.us/my.php?image=yad6df.jpg

photograph signed "In remembering with the large H.Himmler Muftir "

According to documentation from the Nuremberg and Eichmann's trials, the Nazi Germany SS helped finance al-Husseini's efforts in the 1936-1939 revolt in Palestine. Adolf Eichmann actually visited Palestine and met with al-Husseini at that time and subsequently maintained regular contact with him later in Berlin. In 1940, al-Husseini requested the Axis powers to acknowledge the Arab right "... to settle the question of Jewish elements in Palestine and other Arab countries in accordance with the national and racial interests of the Arabs and along the lines similar to those used to solve the Jewish question in Germany and Italy."
 
#2
Interesting that the Germans formed alliances wirth anti British elements.

Does that mena that the jewish Irgun and Stern gangs were fighting for the sames side as Hitler? These chaps seem to have carried out more acts of terrorism durign the war than the palestinians. On your other pro Israel post you dismissed the Stern Gang as insignificanrt. Small but far from insignificant, but since they containded some of the founders of the Likud party including two Prime Ministers.
 
#3
Pteranadon said:
Interesting that the Germans formed alliances wirth anti British elements.

On your other pro Israel post you dismissed the Stern Gang as insignificanrt. Small but far from insignificant, but since they containded some of the founders of the Likud party including two Prime Ministers.
You mean they were members of IZ"L. The political right in Israel did not come to the fore of politics until the '70s and it took both men 30-40 years to ascend to the top.
 
#4
Let's look at Finland - a democratic country in 1941. Finns received German weapons too (and in big numbers). Finland hosted German troops, attacked Soviet Union (ally of the UK). The UK declared a state of war with Finland and what?

Some (maybe very few) Palestinian private persons 61-65 years ago received German weapons and what?
 
#5
Zionists who tried to establish contact with the Nazis did so with only one intention: to rescue Jewish lives from Nazi occupied Europe. Stern group was a tiny fringe organiation (500 members at most), which hoped it could make a deal with the Nazis to save Europe's Jews by getting them to Palestine. As the 'final solution' was not adopted by the Nazis until 1942, they were not behaving wholly irrationally.

Pteranadon, I've already replied it

here
http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/p=678032/highlight=Hakim.html#678032
 
#6
KGB_resident said:
Some (maybe very few) Palestinian private persons 61-65 years ago received German weapons and what?
There were very strong links between the nationalist arabs and the Nazis. The former saw the British as having betrayed them in their quest for independence post WWI and they also saw Jewish immigration into Palestine as a threat, therefore it was a natural alliance. The Nazis saw the arabs as a way of undermining the British position in the Middle East in WWII (e.g. the Iraqi uprising in 1941) aimed at deflecting British men & material away from the front in N. Africa.

As far as I was aware, the Germans were loathe to supply too much equipment to the arabs but provided training for nationalist arabs (including those from the Mandate).
 
#7
It's not exactly news. The activities of the Germans in the middle East are well known. Attempts to promote anti-British risings in Iraq and Afghanistan were good ideas on their part. Had they been successful they would have cause us serious problems.



KGB_resident said:
Let's look at Finland - a democratic country in 1941. Finns received German weapons too (and in big numbers). Finland hosted German troops, attacked Soviet Union (ally of the UK). The UK declared a state of war with Finland and what?

Some (maybe very few) Palestinian private persons 61-65 years ago received German weapons and what?

Finland, received lots of weapons and equipment from France and Britain to help them against the Soviets who'd invaded them in case you'd forgotten and when the Germans and Finns attacked the Soviet Union we weren't allies. In fact Brtiain only declared war on Finland almost 6 months after the start of the continuation war and the USA never did.
 
#8
cdo_gunner said:
In fact Brtiain only declared war on Finland almost 6 months after the start of the continuation war
...because Finland crossed pre-Winter-war border. Finland (democratic state btw) claimed to annex huge territories in Russia that never been part of Finland, where were no Finns (never in history).

So what was a difference between Stalin's Soviet Union and democratic Finland in 40's? Only a size of territory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuation_war

Finnish radio intelligence is said to have participated effectively in German actions against British convoys to Murmansk.
...
On July 31, 1941, British RAF made an air raid on the northern Finnish port of Petsamo
So first British military action took place long before formal declaration of war.
 
#9
KGB_resident said:
Finnish radio intelligence is said to have participated effectively in German actions against British convoys to Murmansk.
...
On July 31, 1941, British RAF made an air raid on the northern Finnish port of Petsamo
So first British military action took place long before formal declaration of war.

Ah, yes the raid of July 1941. If you'd actually care to learn a little about it you'd see that the Fleet Air Arm (not the RAF) attacked both Kirkenes (Norway) and Petsamo (Finland...now of course Pechenga and part of Russia). It wasn't aimed at Finnish troops or targets. In fact there were precious few Finns there at all...thanks to the activities of the Soviets during the winter war. The raid was aimed at destroying German controlled shipping and port installations, these two ports were important for keeping Gebirgs Korps Norwegen supplied in their attempt to reach Murmansk, which of course they never did. The raid itself was a complete disaster and many men and aircraft were lost. As it happens, some of those crews are buried in the small commonwealth war cemetery in the town where i live.


http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/RollofHonour/Battlehonour_crewlists/Petsamo_Kirkenes_1941.html


As were talking of air raids. Do you defend the Red Air Force's bombing of Helsinki?
 
#10
This time they are publicly admitting this.

http://www.pmw.org.il/LatestBulletins.htm#b240506

Hamas newspaper boasts:
Hitler called Palestinians model revolutionaries
Overview:
The admiration of Hitler among Palestinians

By Itamar Marcus and Barbara Crook, May 24, 2006

The Hamas newspaper this week chronicled with pride the ways in which different foreign leaders singled out the Palestinians as examples of ideal revolutionaries. The first leader cited by the Hamas weekly, Al-Rissala, for praising the Palestinians was Adolf Hitler:

"Adolf Hitler, while exciting the Germans of the Sudetenland - the Sudetenland is a German province that the Allies had annexed to Czechoslovakia after the First World War - told them in his broadcasts: Look at what the Palestinian revolutionaries are doing to Great Britain!!"
[Al-Rissala (Hamas Weekly), May 18, 2006]

Overview: Admiration of Hitler in the Palestinian Authority:

It may be surprising to Western observers to see Palestinians taking pride in having been praised by Hitler. But it is important to understand that the utter revulsion of Hitler expected in the West is not true in Palestinian society. Palestinians can be found who are named "Hitler" as a first name: Hitler Salah [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Sept. 28, 2005], Hitler Abu-Alrab [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Jan. 27, 2005], Hitler Mahmud Abu-Libda [Al Hayat Al Jadida, Dec.18, 2000].

This phenomenon of Palestinians being named after Hitler was explained in an article in the official PA daily praising the rewriting of history and the doing of "justice" to Hitler:

"Even Adolf Hitler, who after the fall of Nazi Germany turned into a political horror for most of the writers and artists, during the last decades has started to return himself to his part of the picture. There are some in Britain who defended Hitler and tried to do justice for him. There are elderly people, among them Arabs, who still carry the name Hitler since their fathers, who were charmed by him, linked them [their children] with his name."
[Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, April 13, 2000]

One article explained the phenomenon of naming Palestinians after admired foreign leaders - such as Napoleon and the Nazi General Rommel:

"Sometimes parents name their children with foreign names, due to the father's admiration to a foreign personality. This is the source of the names: Rommel [famous Nazi General] and Napoleon."
[Al-Ayyam, November 15, 2001 "Woman's Voice" supplement].

The admiration for Hitler is consistent with the status of Mein Kampf, which a PA daily cited as a book on the best sellers' list.
[Al Hayat Al Jadida, Sept. 2, 1999].


[Husseini inspects Nazi troops] [Hitler with Husseini]


A contributing factor to this admiration may be the history of the Hitler - Arab alliance during World War 2. The Arab leader in British Palestine, the Mufti Haj Amin al-Husseini, was actively allied with Hitler. The numerous meetings between the Mufti and Hitler are well documented.

Finally, the PA daily published an interview with an elderly Lebanese which described the man's professed friendship with Hitler, as well as his pride in fighting for Hitler: And whereas this is a personal account whose historical accuracy is not important, what is significant is the positive, even proud attitude about his friendship with Hitler, that is being expressed so routinely.

Interview with Sheikh Ali Hussain Abu-Ibrahim, a Palestinian resident of Lebanon who claims he is 116 years old:

"Question: What are the important events in your life that left the biggest impression?
Answer: The first was the Hitler event. I met him in Jerusalem in one of the Turkish Army camps, and the friendship between us was very tight. At the time I was a sergeant while Hitler was a simple private. The relationship between us tightened even more once Turkey entered the war together with Germany. The second event was when I participated [with the Nazi army] in entering France and conquering it. I was in charge of the cannon that shelled Paris, which had an active influence on the fall of the French capital and its conquest without any notable resistance. Hitler congratulated me on this shelling and its consequences… As an artillery officer I took part in many operations against the English and France, until the end of the Second World-War …"
[Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, May 12, 2003]

Clearly, the name Hitler does not have the stigma in PA society that it has in the West. Indeed, not only the Hamas daily, but the Fatah controlled PA dailies as well, have written in favorable tones about Hitler. Clearly, to some Palestinians the man and his name are sources of admiration.
 
#11
cdo_gunner said:
KGB_resident said:
Finnish radio intelligence is said to have participated effectively in German actions against British convoys to Murmansk.
...
On July 31, 1941, British RAF made an air raid on the northern Finnish port of Petsamo
So first British military action took place long before formal declaration of war.

Ah, yes the raid of July 1941. If you'd actually care to learn a little about it you'd see that the Fleet Air Arm (not the RAF) attacked both Kirkenes (Norway) and Petsamo (Finland...now of course Pechenga and part of Russia). It wasn't aimed at Finnish troops or targets. In fact there were precious few Finns there at all...thanks to the activities of the Soviets during the winter war. The raid was aimed at destroying German controlled shipping and port installations, these two ports were important for keeping Gebirgs Korps Norwegen supplied in their attempt to reach Murmansk, which of course they never did. The raid itself was a complete disaster and many men and aircraft were lost. As it happens, some of those crews are buried in the small commonwealth war cemetery in the town where i live.


http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/RollofHonour/Battlehonour_crewlists/Petsamo_Kirkenes_1941.html


As were talking of air raids. Do you defend the Red Air Force's bombing of Helsinki?
Frankly speaking I'm unaware about them. Anyway a war is a war. If you begin a war and tries to capture territories that are not yours then you should be prepared that your own capital could be bombed. Finland had a possiblity to capitulate after Stalingrad. The result of the war was predictable in 1943. In this case many lives would be saved.

Returning to the theme of the thread we even can't compare Finland with Palestinians.
 

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