British Army to Cerakote Entire Infantry Weapon Fleet

#81
'Service weapons'? Its a gun, a badly made, badly designed and very flawed gun - such a 'brilliant' design, no one else has bought it.
Painting it brown merely colours the turd they correct colour after over 30 years of fiddling with it.
"Gun", really you never served throbber?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#82
A number of years ago an entire Bn worth of link ammo was written off as they thought it would look good if it was all unpacked, laid out, oiled up nice and shinny ready for the ammo inspection!
And the person responsible for the order was severely disciplined, receiving both a fine and promotion block.

Or it was quietly ignored as no-one of a sufficiently low rank could be blamed.
 
#83
Managed to get my hands on a Black Chromed L85 today before they are issued to Public Duties troops.

It actually looks (and feels) decent, particularly with the shiny PD Bayonet and Magazine attached.

Whether it's a good use of taxpayers money is another question, however this is what happens when you have loads of rifles and hardly any service personnel to use them, much better than just scrapping them in my opinion.
 
#84
I once got bollocked for not painting a brick wall pattern on one side of the hessian skirt of my ESV. Because you wouldn't notice a camouflage box body, cab, and 20KVA if they were sitting on top of a brick wall.
Reminds me of a visit to RAF Lossiemouth when I asked the Station Commander why he had guys painting the main hangers in a camo pattern. He turned to me with a look of mild disgust on his face...shortly followed by a rather embarrassed silence and a groan of realisation. I see they are now painted plain green.

You would never guess its an airfield from above...ever... camo hangers would make a huge difference lol Google Maps


You can see 3 typhoons sat outside the cluster of smaller hangers bottom centre. Perhaps they should be painted in a tarmac camo? (These are the interceptor chaps that wave to the Russians regularly).
 
#85
Managed to get my hands on a Black Chromed L85 today before they are issued to Public Duties troops.

It actually looks (and feels) decent, particularly with the shiny PD Bayonet and Magazine attached.

Whether it's a good use of taxpayers money is another question, however this is what happens when you have loads of rifles and hardly any service personnel to use them, much better than just scrapping them in my opinion.
In these chemical times, I'm not even sure if that is for real or a wah.
 
#88
With some of the stuff the army is coming up with I'm yet to be convinced certain HQs are not having their drinking water spiked with LSD. Maybe I'm just noticing the insanity more unless, of course, it's me who's losing the plot...
I'm not sure I follow. If you're going to have soldiers on PD, and issue them uniform for this high-profile task, then why not have their weapons as smart as they are - it's a fairly low cost in the grand scheme of things. They can still be used as a weapon if required, it's not like the surface finish inhibits the primary function of the weapon.

We already do it with Kings Troops guns.
 
#89
I'm not sure I follow. If you're going to have soldiers on PD, and issue them uniform for this high-profile task, then why not have their weapons as smart as they are - it's a fairly low cost in the grand scheme of things. They can still be used as a weapon if required, it's not like the surface finish inhibits the primary function of the weapon.

We already do it with Kings Troops guns.
It's precisely because it makes perfect sense that I though, nah, gotta be a wind up!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#90
Reminds me of a visit to RAF Lossiemouth when I asked the Station Commander why he had guys painting the main hangers in a camo pattern. He turned to me with a look of mild disgust on his face...shortly followed by a rather embarrassed silence and a groan of realisation. I see they are now painted plain green.

You would never guess its an airfield from above...ever... camo hangers would make a huge difference lol Google Maps


You can see 3 typhoons sat outside the cluster of smaller hangers bottom centre. Perhaps they should be painted in a tarmac camo? (These are the interceptor chaps that wave to the Russians regularly).
Yet before WW2 the Air ministry managed to get urban cammo applied to various airfields and plants but its the whole airfield that needs doing!
 
#91
Yet before WW2 the Air ministry managed to get urban cammo applied to various airfields and plants but its the whole airfield that needs doing!

There are still War Office building dotted around the country with camoflage paint schemes. A lot of factories were painted in a similar fashion.

Apparently quite effective from the air, often done a bit like dazzle paint on ships, intented to make the shape of the building difficult to identify

With airfields, apparently nightime decoy fields were quite effective too
 
#92
If you can shoot .25moa with any service .303 rifle I`ll give you wheelbarrow full of tenners.
What would be the point? If the deciding factor in service weapons competition is your ability to point, aim, and fire from a rapidly adopted position - the absolute accuracy of the rifle is less important. The bulk of it is snap shooting, not deliberate fire. We're not American, after all... ;)

The service weapons competitions I took part in, had targetry that was 6MOA wide (or more) and didn't much care where you hit it [1]; and required you to cope with target exposures of between three and five seconds, often when you were in the standing alert position, or had just completed a run down..

The average group size for most firers in those conditions, using a 2MOA service weapon, is... a bit more than 6MOA. Developing firers miss as often as they hit; in other words, you could spend extra to get a 0.25MOA AR-15 straight pull [2] instead of a 2MOA No.4, but it won't improve your scores that much.


[1] Stand fast the FIBUA and Moving Target matches.
[2] And while it might be possible, I'll bet you it costs an absolute shedload and relies on handloads - 0.25 MOA is suspiciously good.
 
#93
There are still War Office building dotted around the country with camoflage paint schemes. A lot of factories were painted in a similar fashion.

Apparently quite effective from the air, often done a bit like dazzle paint on ships, intented to make the shape of the building difficult to identify

With airfields, apparently nightime decoy fields were quite effective too
You could waste a whole evening on this stuff :)

Fields of Deception: Britain's Bombing Decoys of World War II (Monuments of War) - Paperback; Dobinson 2013. Methuen Publishing Ltd; Revised ed. edition.

Decoys

The Art of Deception - Think Defence

Decoy airfields and decoy sites constructed by tradesmen, and various illusions, did their work day and night, helped by a thriving and very convenient film industry.

We had something like 200 dummy airfields plus 400 dummy urban and industrial sites, like 'Starfish'. TV and film studios (e.g. Shepperton and Pinewood) had been at the deception malarkey for decades.

The role of the film industry in WWII
 
#94
You could waste a whole evening on this stuff :)

Fields of Deception: Britain's Bombing Decoys of World War II (Monuments of War) - Paperback; Dobinson 2013. Methuen Publishing Ltd; Revised ed. edition.

Decoys

The Art of Deception - Think Defence

Decoy airfields and decoy sites constructed by tradesmen, and various illusions, did their work day and night, helped by a thriving and very convenient film industry.

We had something like 200 dummy airfields plus 400 dummy urban and industrial sites, like 'Starfish'. TV and film studios (e.g. Shepperton and Pinewood) had been at the deception malarkey for decades.

The role of the film industry in WWII
As a kid I used to muck about Fobbing Marshes on the Thames Estuary. Its not that far from what was the Shell Haven and Coryton Refineries...now The London Gateway Logistics Park

There was a large area that was set up as a fake refinery just on the other side of the creek from the actual refinery. It consisted of concrete bases that would have rubbish and wood piles onto them, with an ignition and fuel feed system attached.

As soon as bombers were heard, the fuel was ignited and from the air the bombers could see the "burning tanks".

I also remember shallow craters to the North of the refinery, filled with water. We were always told these were bomb craters.

Fake refinery: Google Maps

Some of the craters...the area looks like if has really changed though... Google Maps
Google Maps
 

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