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British Army calls in French troubleshooter

What a waste ! You lose half the bottle every time !

:-(

Not if you do it right...

There is a right way and wrong way.

The right way:


Sabrage...

Edited to add that you can do it with a glass as well. I once saw the Belgian version of the Duke of Westminster smash have a dozen crystal glasses trying to do this... *


* When I asked one of the Belgian officers if the cost of the breakages would be added to their mess bill he told me that the private secretary of the chap who broke the glasses would be along to the mess in the morning with a cheque book to pay for the damage. :)
 
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Noit if you do it right...

There is a right way and wrong way.

The right way:


Sabrage...

Edited to add that you can do it with a glass as well. I once saw the Belgian version of the Duke of Westminster smash have a dozen crystal glasses trying to do this... *


* When I asked one of the Belgian officers if the cost of the breakages would be added to their mess bill he told me that the private secretary of the chap who broke the glasses would be along to the mess in the morning with a cheque book to pay for the damage. :)

Granted but not many people do it right. I have seen more sabrage wounds than bullet wounds....
 
Granted but not many people do it right. I have seen more sabrage wounds than bullet wounds....

I was taught how to do it at a dinner night here:

Club Royal des Officiers du Régiment des Guides

Myself, another Yeomanry Snco and several Yeomanry officers were guests at a dinner night there about 20 years ago. The Loyal Toast was drunk in champagne - "Vive le Roi!"

The food and wine was superb and somewhere at home I have the cork from my champagne bottle with the glass neck still around it... :)
 
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I was taught how to do it at a dinner night here:

Club Royal des Officiers du Régiment des Guides

Myself, another Yeomanry Snco and several Yeomanry officers were guests at a dinner night there about 20 years ago. The Loyal Toast was drunk in champagne - "Vive le Roi!"

The food and wine was superb and somewhere at home I have the cork from my champagne bottle with the glass neck still around it... :)

Brussels has a number of such gems. There is also the house of former Belgian SOE Agents, the Fraternelle des Agents Parachutistes, with mementos on the walls and the possibility of a little tour of the house when booked in advance.
 
A British LTC serving with the FRA 3 Division located in Marseille has done his farewell to arms during a recent parade.

EdDkH7OWsAA7mTg.jpg
 
Meanwhile, in Lille (FRA Rapid Reaction Corps), Lt Col Séan Scullion RE received his French Commendation (from his Belgium DCOS Ops!) for his great work in Africa on Op BARKHANE last year.

Ecdj2axWoAAA0DK.jpg
 
Meanwhile, in Lille (FRA Rapid Reaction Corps), Lt Col Séan Scullion RE received his French Commendation (from his Belgium DCOS Ops!) for his great work in Africa on Op BARKHANE last year.

View attachment 490170
This underlines the statement from the CEMAT (French Army CGS) that the French Army should encourage allied nations to want to participate in its operations.
 
Interoperability being practised in HQ RRC-Fr this week as the COS, Major General Jerome Goisque, and his MA, Lt Col Campbell Close SCOTS deployed on Ready Soldier. The COS tried UK rations and experienced a ‘basher’ whilst the MA was trained on the French weapon system


The caption says MG Goisque but his beret shows the 2 stars of Général de Brigade (maybe the source of confusion ?)

Goisque.jpg
Basha.jpg
 

Oyibo

LE
My experience with Services language training at DSL (quite some time ago now) was that it was too generic and academic with insufficient time and resources allocated to one on one conversation targeted to the posting requirement of the individual concerned. A classic case was that on (even relatively late) TELIC rotations many "linguists" were deployed having been taught a mixture of "Fus-ha" (i.e classical) and MSA (i.e. Modern Standard Arabic) but were completely baffled by the local Iraqi dialects.

The other thing I noted was that prior language experience was often undervalued and misunderstood. Personally, after I had joined the British Army, as I was (and still am) fluent in both, I applied to take the French and Polish Diploma (NATO SLP 4444) exams in the same year. I was denied because "that would be impossible to do successfully". They did not want me to sit the exams at all without having attended a course either. However I was subsequently assessesed as fully capable by separate military linguists in both languages and that I did not need to be sent on any courses. I achieved distinctions in both in consequent years.

The best military language training that I have witnessed was conducted (again a long time ago) at RAF North Luffenham in a unit specially set up to prepare Serbo-Croat (and later Albanian) speakers for deployment to the Balkans. There, the emphasis was on specific to-task language training with bags of one-on-one conversation (with native speakers) and plenty of operational feedback from Theatre.

In a different way I ran into the Army catch-22 with language courses. I was brought in in Belgium when I was young, so spoke a fair bit of French. On my first NI tour I was in an Int cell with the Unit Education Officer as the OC. He was keen to get me on a French colloquial (perhaps linguist) course - something I heartily agreed with.

The problem was that one couldn't take the courses or exams unless there was an operational requirement - i.e. a posting to a Francophone country or unit. And I could not apply for such a posting because I did not have said quals.

I subsequently did 2 trips to 1ere RCP and one to 2eme REP as an unofficial (and poor) translator / LO. The 1ere RCP taught me how to take to top off a champagne bottle with a wine glass.
 
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Évacuation manuelle mon ami o_O
Are you implying that he is constipated due to the Brit ratpack and will need manual help to evacuate? :rolleyes:
 
In a different way I ran into the Army catch-22 with language courses. I was brought in in Belgium when I was young, so spoke a fair bit of French. On my first NI tour I was in an Int cell with the Unit Education Officer as the OC. He was keen to get me on a French colloquial (perhaps linguist) course - something I heartily agreed with.

The problem was that one couldn't take the courses or exams unless there was an operational requirement - i.e. a posting to a Francophone country or unit. And I could not apply for such a posting because I did not have said quals.

I subsequently did 2 trips to 1ere RCP and one to 2eme REP as an unofficial (and poor) translator / LO. The 1ere RCP taught me how to take to top off a champagne bottle with a wine glass.


I do like the catch 22's of service life.
 

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