Britain's Coast at War: Invasion Threat, Coastal Forces, Bombardment and Training for D-Day

ARRSE Rating
4.00 star(s)
Neil R Storey has had several books published by Pen & Sword. He can also be seen in several documentaries on television.

This book is a broad sweep of coastal history just before and throughout the Second World War. It is arranged both chronologically and thematically. This means that the book can be read cover to cover or focused on a theme or period. It is lavishly illustrated with black and white images and it is good to see some unfamiliar pictures.

The author covers this topic in eleven chapters. He sets the scene in the first chapter, describing the major activities of work and leisure along Britain's coastline in the last summer of peace in 1939. I liked this as it helped set the context for some of the later chapters. He then covers the threat of invasion and coastal defences, coastal air raids, evacuation and restricted areas, naval activities and preparation, and spying. It is, by the author's own admission, not a comprehensive account, but it uses key events to highlight what was happening around Britain's coastline. It does not concentrate on any particular area until the D-Day build up later in the book. I enjoyed that the stories are from around Britain's coast.

It is an easy read. The author uses everday language and structure throughout. The illustrations are appropriate and help to highlight particular sections of the text. At 263 pages, plus notes and index, it is a useful compilation of Second World War history on the home front.

51uFRo51cmL._SX335_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Buy from Amazon
 
Neil R Storey has had several books published by Pen & Sword. He can also be seen in several documentaries on television.

This book is a broad sweep of coastal history just before and throughout the Second World War. It is arranged both chronologically and thematically. This means that the book can be read cover to cover or focused on a theme or period. It is lavishly illustrated with black and white images and it is good to see some unfamiliar pictures.

The author covers this topic in eleven chapters. He sets the scene in the first chapter, describing the major activities of work and leisure along Britain's coastline in the last summer of peace in 1939. I liked this as it helped set the context for some of the later chapters. He then covers the threat of invasion and coastal defences, coastal air raids, evacuation and restricted areas, naval activities and preparation, and spying. It is, by the author's own admission, not a comprehensive account, but it uses key events to highlight what was happening around Britain's coastline. It does not concentrate on any particular area until the D-Day build up later in the book. I enjoyed that the stories are from around Britain's coast.

It is an easy read. The author uses everday language and structure throughout. The illustrations are appropriate and help to highlight particular sections of the text. At 263 pages, plus notes and index, it is a useful compilation of Second World War history on the home front.

51uFRo51cmL._SX335_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Buy from Amazon
That must be Rowan Atkinson’s Grandad on the cover!
 
Anyone interested in this sort of thing would do well to take a little drive around West Wales, still miles of tank traps and pillboxes and other leftovers from these days
 

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