Britain's Biggest Warship - 3 Part TV Series

Met some ex RN lads after a Zeebrugge commemoration this morning. They universally enjoyed the programme, liked what they saw and are looking forward to the next (#3 of 3) episode.
 
Met some ex RN lads after a Zeebrugge commemoration this morning. They universally enjoyed the programme, liked what they saw and are looking forward to the next (#3 of 3) episode.
Agree - I think this is best RN show in years.
 
Any easy links to stream this abroad? BBC player is locked to the UK and all my proxies are outside the UK.

I had the unlucky task of trying to close the 'outstanding' issues on Protector, a Tenix Australia build for New Zealand.

On day one I opened the contract for the Sealift Ship and have never looked for another job faster.

They had a sailor die due to the position of the RHIBs cutouts (i thought they were called Davids??)

The contract linked to the draft drawings and these cutouts had moved several times but never been logged.

The crane was bought from the cheapest manufacturer and was, IIRC something bought from a vehicle manufacturer. It was so underrated it couldnt lift the landing craft so instead of buying a new one, they opted to lighten the landing craft.

Here came an Aluminum bow which when hooked up to the ship did not have the integrity to hold the craft in the swell and a craft was lost.

None of these changes were made to any of the contracts, it stunk of amateur.

Hopefully the QE class is a superior British built ship.
 
Whatever the process, does it use - unnecessarily - carbon-based fuels, for seemingly the bulk of the trash?!
The gash is its own fuel and once it gets going the process - thermal degradation - is self sustaining. A conventional burner is necessarily used to get started by heating the chamber to the process temperature, ‘Harry Redders’.
 
Great programme and big thumbs up to the RN.
A question for our Andrew colleagues please.
Interesting to see how many civilian contractors accompanied the ship on its sea trials, including construction workers still completing work on the ship.
Given everyone in the ships company has other duties when it comes to daily routine and in particular, in emergencies (fire fighting, first aid etc), what level of basic training is given to the contractors before they set sail and are they told to stay out of the way during emergency drills or are they expected to muck in/contribute?
Just curious.
 
Great programme and big thumbs up to the RN.
A question for our Andrew colleagues please.
Interesting to see how many civilian contractors accompanied the ship on its sea trials, including construction workers still completing work on the ship.
Given everyone in the ships company has other duties when it comes to daily routine and in particular, in emergencies (fire fighting, first aid etc), what level of basic training is given to the contractors before they set sail and are they told to stay out of the way during emergency drills or are they expected to muck in/contribute?
Just curious.
They’ll have a v basic awareness (I think they do the one day sea survival course), but in the main their responsibility is to raise the alarm and then get out of the way...
 
They’ll have a v basic awareness (I think they do the one day sea survival course), but in the main their responsibility is to raise the alarm and then get out of the way...
Thanks.
 
Are the contractors included in the mandatory dry bumming, or is that restricted to the sailors.
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
Great programme and big thumbs up to the RN.
A question for our Andrew colleagues please.
Interesting to see how many civilian contractors accompanied the ship on its sea trials, including construction workers still completing work on the ship.
Given everyone in the ships company has other duties when it comes to daily routine and in particular, in emergencies (fire fighting, first aid etc), what level of basic training is given to the contractors before they set sail and are they told to stay out of the way during emergency drills or are they expected to muck in/contribute?
Just curious.
My own experience as either civilian sea-rider or RNR encubrance: you muster with the "spare hands" (wardroom annex on the 45s I was on) and keep quiet and wait to be told what to do; which would be "sit it out and stay out of the way" unless things got really bad.

You'd usually only have done the two-day Embarked Forces sea survival course if anything at all (civilian tech teams from BAE Cowes, working on Radar 1045, hadn't even had the chance to do that), which is the very basics of "how to raise the alarm and at least start reacting to fire or flood before being pushed aside by the professionals, how to abandon ship with less chance of killing yourself or others": so your utility might possibly go as far as basic lifting and shifting, like "carry those AFFF drums and follow her until you're told to put them down, then grab the back of a stretcher and take it where you're told" but - frankly - if they're turning to me to help with DC&FF, things are probably getting pretty desperate...
 
I watched episode 2 last night. It's alright but in my opinion the political correctness of these types of programmes ruin it. These programmes seem to focus on a token BAME or they get a pretty girl out for footage of steering the ship or stood in the air traffic control tower.
Secondly these programmes seem heavily sensored. I bet the guys who speak their minds, say it as it is and have a backbone are kept well away from the camera. I don't know if PAYD contractors provide the catering supplies and dictate the menus on ships, but at my unit PAYD is utter dog shite and not fit for purpose because healthy food would cut into the profit margin of the civvy shareholders.
But it doesn't surprise me that inconvenient truths like PAYD, funding, the spiralling costs of F35, retention and manning levels are not talked about in front of the camera. Instead they film the ships "yes man" to paint a rosy picture
 
They’ll have a v basic awareness (I think they do the one day sea survival course), but in the main their responsibility is to raise the alarm and then get out of the way...
Some of the contractors were / are retired Chiefs, Warrant Officers and Officers. As you say, Contractors did an STCW Personal Survival Techniques Course ( some were still in date from ISSC) and an ENG1 medical. Some of them were gusting 70 and quicker on their feet than some of the so called ‘active service’ bloaters mentioned earlier.
 
Great programme and big thumbs up to the RN.
A question for our Andrew colleagues please.
Interesting to see how many civilian contractors accompanied the ship on its sea trials, including construction workers still completing work on the ship.
Given everyone in the ships company has other duties when it comes to daily routine and in particular, in emergencies (fire fighting, first aid etc), what level of basic training is given to the contractors before they set sail and are they told to stay out of the way during emergency drills or are they expected to muck in/contribute?
Just curious.
There were civilian workers on the old POW when She went into action against the Bismark. No elf and safety in those days though.;)
 
I watched episode 2 last night. I don't know if PAYD contractors provide the catering supplies and dictate the menus on ships, but at my unit PAYD is utter dog shite and not fit for purpose because healthy food would cut into the profit margin of the civvy shareholders.
But it doesn't surprise me that inconvenient truths like PAYD, funding, the spiralling costs of F35, retention and manning levels are not talked about in front of the camera. Instead they film the ships "yes man" to paint a rosy picture
NO PAYD at sea.
 
I watched the second episode on Tv, very impressed with he quick actions of perosnel, especially in the engineering/engne room section.

I remember watching a BBC documentary on Richard Baker, a BBC TV news presenter years ago. He served in World War Two as a Royal Naval Reservist Able Seaman, and later in the 1970s or 1980s was also a Naval Reserve officer. The BBC made a series of TV programmes on him when he went on his shipboard annual trianing. it was very ineresting. I hink he held he rank of lieutenant or similar rank. If still alive, he lives in retirment, aged around 92 or 93.
 
I watched episode 2 last night. It's alright but in my opinion the political correctness of these types of programmes ruin it. These programmes seem to focus on a token BAME or they get a pretty girl out for footage of steering the ship or stood in the air traffic control tower.
Secondly these programmes seem heavily sensored. I bet the guys who speak their minds, say it as it is and have a backbone are kept well away from the camera. I don't know if PAYD contractors provide the catering supplies and dictate the menus on ships, but at my unit PAYD is utter dog shite and not fit for purpose because healthy food would cut into the profit margin of the civvy shareholders.
But it doesn't surprise me that inconvenient truths like PAYD, funding, the spiralling costs of F35, retention and manning levels are not talked about in front of the camera. Instead they film the ships "yes man" to paint a rosy picture
Have to say some of the old sweats featured in the first two episodes didn't strike me as 'yes men', more like mature, experienced individuals who would have no qualms telling it like it is, if the occasion needed it.
The one slightly sour note for me, was the bigging up of the two helicopters landing on the deck, given the well known controversy of the carriers lack of fixed wing air power. When is the carrier expected to have fast jets delivered and then taking off?
 

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