Britain's Biggest Warship - 3 Part TV Series

#81
#85
The piddly little Brickwoods gun is easy, even I could do it - and did, when shanghaied by Dryad which formed its crew out of Sub Lts on course there (we didn't win).
Another 'out of hoop' talker. The Brickwoods Gun is exactly the same size and weight as the 'real' field gun, although there were a couple of extra bits welded on here and there to the 'real' field guns used at the Royal Tournament. As you know, being an expert, the run itself is totally different to the RT one. You MAY be getting confused with the very small field gun that many establishment sea cadet teams use to run their gun run.
 

Guns

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#88
You are talking out of your hoop again! At best you were a junior officer (maybe even in the in the Cadets?) at the time. The rank and file matelot, who I'll admit neither knew nor cared about the manning costs, greatly lamented the Field Gun competition.

So any celebrating was probably over a large pink gin or two.*


*Other Wardroom drinks are available!
Negate Sea Cat. It was well received by all those who had to backfill the job gapped by the gym bunnies who fucked off to run around for the Royal Tournament. Several field gun types became quite adept at avoiding deployments and BOSTs by running. And when they did return their stuck up attitude didn’t go down well with mess mates who had to cover for them.
 
#89
Free of charge! ;)

Regards,
MM
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Found/find My balls up :rolleyes::)
 
#91
Negate Sea Cat. It was well received by all those who had to backfill the job gapped by the gym bunnies who fucked off to run around for the Royal Tournament. Several field gun types became quite adept at avoiding deployments and BOSTs by running. And when they did return their stuck up attitude didn’t go down well with mess mates who had to cover for them.
Of course having served down a mess deck in the 90s you’ll know all about that......
 
#92
Of course having served down a mess deck in the 90s you’ll know all about that......
2 points -

Both he and I served in a mess deck in the 1990s - standard Naval Officer training.

You are, at most, about 50ft way from a mess deck in most pusser’s greys. Life onboard has very little secrets.
 

Guns

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#93
Of course having served down a mess deck in the 90s you’ll know all about that......
You have heard of Upper Yardman???? Not all officers join straight from school, its one of those things that adds to the rich tappersty of life. In fact I have served with a guy who joined as an Officer but didn't like it and left to join as a rating and is now a CPO.

And as a Middle watch OOW you have fours hours to hear all the drips of the ships company delivered via the QM and BM. Life onboard, as you may know if you have been to sea, is all about people dripping like ten men to any SR or Officer they can.

Any half good junior officer will have plenty of oppurtunies to listen - part of ship, Specials on the FX, watch keeping, just chatting around the ship and as OOD on the flight deck late at night the QM and BM will chat cos there isn't much else to do.
 
#94
I can't claim to be in touch with the modern Royal Navy but I do believe that lean manning has more to do with money and recruiting difficulties rather than modern technology and automation.
I believe it was made pretty clear that budgetary pressures were the driver behind lean manning. Considering that these decisions were probably made 10-15 years ago when the design was being firmed up I suspect that recruiting difficulties were not the major driver.
 
#95
I watched it on iPlayer last night. Good the see Cdr (Air) explaining that a carrier is not just a floating airfield, and it was good seeing the mighty Sea Harrier continuing to serve Navy and nation in retirement, training chockheads at Culdrose.
 
#96
Having done Brickwoods, you effectively train at lunchtime and after work, for about six weeks before hand.

As I understand Field Gun, there was a three month, full time, period of phys/early training, and then a further sustained period before the Royal Tournament. I think each crew had something like 75 to start with, reducing to 30 or so for the actual runs.
The original Field Gun consisted of 2 Crews A & B both had 18 men plus there were 4 spares in case someone got injured. I think we started in March and the first month was spent getting fit, weights, circuit training and a few other exercises invented by the PTIs. One for instance was running across the mudflats with a 56ilb bag of sand.
April was when the Gun was introduced into the mix, from then on it was training with the gun for approx 6-8 hrs a day then onto circuit training. All in all it was six months of continuous training from morning to night that's all we did we didn't do are normal jobs and everybody share the same messdeck and galley. Punishments were hard and severe, mostly physical.
Drinking was frowned upon and if the staff found out that you were drinking more you could accept their punishment or be booted out there and then. Worst of all were the White Rats who would report you to the staff for the slightest misdemeanors hands in pockets, smoking and the worst of all walking. We had to double everywhere because it was a full time Gunnery School the place was crawling with GIs.
Imagine if you will a Camp that trained RSMs there were fecking dozens of them, they hid behind trees, hedges and doorways and cars waiting to pounce on some poor unsuspecting soul.
The Field Gun itself was a lethal bit of kit when it was being dismantled and slung about the wheels weighed 120lbs each, limber 363lbs , gun barrel and gun carriage 1,250 ibls and it fecking hurt when it hit you.
 
#98
Can't help thinking that when they chopped the Field Gun runs, the Andrew lost a valuable recruiting tool.

Meh.
Really? Did running up and down in a White Front pulling/assembling/etc an old Victorian gun really appeal to potential recruits?

I believe it was made pretty clear that budgetary pressures were the driver behind lean manning. Considering that these decisions were probably made 10-15 years ago when the design was being firmed up I suspect that recruiting difficulties were not the major driver.
Surely lean manning has been the norm from the time the Type 23 was being designed? Even if we could recruit x thousand extra people, would the politicians and bean counters let us?

I look forward to the second and third episodes which will be at sea on trials.
 
#99
Really? Did running up and down in a White Front pulling/assembling/etc an old Victorian gun really appeal to potential recruits?.
I dunno but might being given a pillion behind a White Helmet, doing in excess of 70mph around a field at Otterburn, on ex Dragon's Teeth, as a space cadet have had summat to do with my enlistment 3 years later into the Royal Corps. S'funny how a teenager's brain works init?

edit messed up quote function
 
Really? Did running up and down in a White Front pulling/assembling/etc an old Victorian gun really appeal to potential recruits?

Yes, I think it does / did. Like the Red Arrows, or HCR at Horse Guards parade. It's stuff like that which turns heads, and gets your 16yr old spotty yoof interested - a 'hook' if you like. Kind of separates us from Tesco's!!

The average spotty yoof entering an AFCO knows damn fine that he has a 1-in-5bn chance of ever becoming Red 1, and if he joins the RLC he'll never sit aside a steed at Horse Guards, but that's not the point. The most effective recruiting tools are often those that aren't specifically designed to be so in the first place. I've mentioned on another thread that when I was in the cadets I got the chance to go flying in a Shackleton. From then on in, I was sold.

And, specifically with the RN Field Gun, a direct link to heritage and tradition, which whilst not being my 'bag', I can understand why the Navy are proud of theirs.
 

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