Britain's Biggest Warship - 3 Part TV Series

I've enjoyed the series so far. Distant memories of Sailing and the Ark and a lot better than the RN's last airing. Without getting jingoistic about it a certain feeling of pride as she sailed down the Forth for the open sea. Well done to those who built her and hope that she's a lucky ship for those who serve her.

Used to see her being built when visiting my parents and didn't really believe that we'd see her completed before the politicians stepped in and he'd her converted into something else or sold off to who knows who.

It will be a cracking ship once she receives her compliment of F-35s. I doubt many realise what the F-35 is truly capable of but I'l leave comment on that for the F-35 thread.
 
When the sailors were donning the fire fighting gear (dressed as proper firemen) the chef was there - would he also be a firefighter?

Also the chef served in Afghanistan - given his background and accent I wonder if he was doing any interpreter duties!
 
When the sailors were donning the fire fighting gear (dressed as proper firemen) the chef was there - would he also be a firefighter?
Anyone can be a firefighter - genuinely. We all do the same course, and have an equal expectation of being called upon to do it.
 
When the sailors were donning the fire fighting gear (dressed as proper firemen) the chef was there - would he also be a firefighter?

Also the chef served in Afghanistan - given his background and accent I wonder if he was doing any interpreter duties!
On-board a ship, assigned people will be firefighters. Does not matter what there background/day job is, so potentially, yes, a chef could be a firefighter. All crew are trained in basic firefighting however.

As for his trip to the sun, I am not sure why you would assume that because he is of dusky skin he must have been an interpreter...I am sure he will have been serving death on a plate in a ships mess....because that's what trained chefs do....and there where plenty of boats floating about supporting the troops on the ground.
 
I presume then that those nearest just sling BA on over their working rig and crack on whilst another group suits up in more robust fire fighting gear?
The very first people at the scene will be expected to extinguish the fire.

They will be relieved within two minutes by a pair of ship's company (pre-nominated) wearing BA and a bit more protection.

Those two will be relived within a further six minutes and thirty seconds by five members of the ship's company (also pre-determined). If the five man team (which can include women, obvs) can't extinguish the fire, or have to close the compartment down, the ship will go to emergency stations.

At that point everyone goes to their emergency station: the first five people who arrive at the repair posts (who could be any specialisation or rank, including Officers) will be nominated as the immediate relief party, get dressed in fire fighting equipment. They will then immediately head to the scene of the incident (if the door to the compartment remains open) and fight the fire, or will remain ready at a muster point until all the SOPs are complete before re-entering the compartment.

The guys who are pre-nominated are part of the Standing Sea Emergency Party; as the XO (2 i/c) I was effectively i/c recce for the SSEP C2 process. The most junior guy in the SSEP can have been on-board for as few as three weeks.
 
The very first people at the scene will be expected to extinguish the fire.

They will be relieved within two minutes by a pair of ship's company (pre-nominated) wearing BA and a bit more protection.

Those two will be relived within a further six minutes and thirty seconds by five members of the ship's company (also pre-determined). If the five man team (which can include women, obvs) can't extinguish the fire, or have to close the compartment down, the ship will go to emergency stations.

At that point everyone goes to their emergency station: the first five people who arrive at the repair posts (who could be any specialisation or rank, including Officers) will be nominated as the immediate relief party, get dressed in fire fighting equipment. They will then immediately head to the scene of the incident (if the door to the compartment remains open) and fight the fire, or will remain ready at a muster point until all the SOPs are complete before re-entering the compartment.

The guys who are pre-nominated are part of the Standing Sea Emergency Party; as the XO (2 i/c) I was effectively i/c recce for the SSEP C2 process. The most junior guy in the SSEP can have been on-board for as few as three weeks.
Fire is always my biggest worry when deployed...

;)

Regards,
MM
 
Fire is always my biggest worry when deployed...

;)

Regards,
MM

I take it you were not married then?..because my biggest fear was my missus running off

Anyway is this photo for people in the late stages of dementia, in case they forgot what a fire looks like?
 
When the sailors were donning the fire fighting gear (dressed as proper firemen) the chef was there - would he also be a firefighter?

Also the chef served in Afghanistan - given his background and accent I wonder if he was doing any interpreter duties!

No but when they get shore leave in Pompey, Glasgow or Luton his terping skills become extremely useful when ordering a Taxi.
 
You've never heard of press gangs then?

Do you read English? or did the bit were i mentioned the "Technical" service just pass you by? unless you think the age of sail falls under this moniker.

As most know the Navy once took people who were useful from the neck up as opposed from the neck down. (and to reiterate i'm talking about the internal combustion engine)
 
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Really?

"Persons convicted of felonies may request a waiver to permit their enlistment. The waiver procedure is not automatic, and approval is based on each individual case. One of the considerations in determining whether a waiver will be granted is the individual’s ability to adjust successfully to civilian life for a period of time following his or her release from judicial control."

Suggests different...in fact...suggests exactly the same as the UK military.

I believe it was 42 Convictions he had, for every conviction there is apparently least three to 5 crimes committed not recorded before capture/ justice.

Do you honestly think they would take a 32 YO with 42 convictions and jail? ..NO.
 
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Until they turn up outside the Russian embassy. As for Bulgers killer this is bullshit it would be a kin to a jew serving in the Waffen SS, He'd be living dangerously.

From Der Spiegel:

A German journalist presents the extraordinary and disturbing story of a Nazi SS Officer who lied, deceived and conned, yet also saved the lives of up to a thousand Latvian Jews. A new Oscar Schindler? Sort of. The story has an added twist: the man was Jewish.

His name was Eleke Scherwitz and although much about him remains unknown (like his date and place of birth or family tree) he was, indeed, both Jewish and a Nazi SS officer charged with overseeing a concentration camp in Riga, Latvia. His is the only such story in history and his life -- documented in a new book by German historian-journalist Anita Kugler -- offers a startling mirror on the human complexities of World War II, a fight often portrayed as black and white, good vs. evil.
 
I believe it was 42 Convictions he had, for every conviction there is apparently least three to 5 crimes committed not recorded before capture/ justice.

Do you honestly think they would take a 32 YO with 42 convictions and jail? ..NO.
You've really got the sand in your fanny about this haven't you.

Given the USN's current propensity for crashing into things whilst out and about on the ocean blue I'd hardly suggest they were a global standard setter. Taking a wider view, Manning and Snowden might suggest their vetting processes aren't all that could be desired.

I can see where you're lack of belief in people changing comes from though. I mean, you're still a penis.
 
From Der Spiegel:

A German journalist presents the extraordinary and disturbing story of a Nazi SS Officer who lied, deceived and conned, yet also saved the lives of up to a thousand Latvian Jews. A new Oscar Schindler? Sort of. The story has an added twist: the man was Jewish.

His name was Eleke Scherwitz and although much about him remains unknown (like his date and place of birth or family tree) he was, indeed, both Jewish and a Nazi SS officer charged with overseeing a concentration camp in Riga, Latvia. His is the only such story in history and his life -- documented in a new book by German historian-journalist Anita Kugler -- offers a startling mirror on the human complexities of World War II, a fight often portrayed as black and white, good vs. evil.

Another pointless comment, i knew about this man, i remember him saying that "they were good comrades, but if they'd ever found out i was a jew they would of hanged me from the nearest tree"
 
Fire is always my biggest worry when deployed...

;)

Regards,
MM
all that Exeter history (I used to con my parents into taking me for dinner there when I was at uni), lost through the lack of an attack party, a stoker with plenty of AFFF and the mighty waterwall nozzle.

And an acroprop and a bag of wooden wedges.

Invincible, we were....
 
Having done Brickwoods, you effectively train at lunchtime and after work, for about six weeks before hand.

As I understand Field Gun, there was a three month, full time, period of phys/early training, and then a further sustained period before the Royal Tournament. I think each crew had something like 75 to start with, reducing to 30 or so for the actual runs.
Were they allowed an extra sausage at brekkie?
 
I believe it was 42 Convictions he had, for every conviction there is apparently least three to 5 crimes committed not recorded before capture/ justice.

Do you honestly think they would take a 32 YO with 42 convictions and jail? ..NO.
Errrrm...yes...if he was of the right character and skill set. You do know you cannot discriminate against age..

There are two sides to every story. You appear to know his whilst the Navy obviously did not investigate, probably never even interviewed him about his past and just accepted that he "was sorry" and let him in. :roll:
 
Just to add about fire fighting.

On a bigger ship you have standing rates manning HQ1, this is both Junior Rates and Senior rates, the Junior Rates do this as part of their ships communal duties, this is 3 months doing work other than your normal role, the JRs only do this once per draft to what ever ship. The work can be pot mess ie cleaning the galley and dining room or Chiefs Messman, making sure the Chiefs Mess is clean, bunkspaces and working the chiefs bar sometimes. This is a full time role.

My first communal duty was HQ1 on Hermes, so firefighting, checking all fire fighting equipment, BAs, safety equipment and ploting damage control on a larger perspex board which had all compartments on the ship marked up. This was my role during the Falklands.

It seemed to see the QE had an HQ1 maned but with touch screens, would love to have seen a bit more detail.

I was also Chiefs men man on the Aurora a cushy number to say the least, I started the role a few days before we hit Aus, did it for 3 months finishing just after Subic Bay, perfect timing.
 

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